Thursday, December 16, 2010

G21: 1901548 Belers

1901548. John Belers

~1381, John born in England, s/o 3803096. Sir James Bellers & 3803097. Margaret Bernak.

1403, Letters of Attorney: John Belers, esq., made Wm. Compton, esq., Thos. Belers, parson of the church of Howeton & Hugh Wymbyssh his attorneys … (S) UKNA.

3/1406, … executors of John Talbot … James Belers, knight, … James’ son John, came with a body of armed men, dragged him, a sick man of eighty, away half-naked, and took him to John Belers’ manor of Sysonby, …

Family notes:
• 1453 record of son John: Leicestershire … James Bellers and Margaret his wife had issue John Bellers and died. The services descended to the said John Bellers as son and heir of James and Margaret, which the said John has issue John, who now defends, and died. The abbot states the land was held of Hamon Bellers, ancestor of John Bellers, whose heir John is, from which Hamon the said John descends, namely, as son of John, son of James, son of Ralph, son of Ralph, son of Hamon. (S) De Banco Roll.

Child of John and ?:

i. John Bellers (950774), born ~1405 in Leicestershire, England.

Monday, December 13, 2010

G21: 1901508

1901508. Philip Malpas

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10/11/1418, Philip Malpas, draper, through Nicholas Martin of Lucca, alien broker, loaned John Middleton of Calais £80.

7/12/1419, Philip found guilty of ursury and ordered committed to prison until he restored to John Middleton £35. (S) Calendar of Plea and Memoranda Rolls, Jones, 1961.

8/6/1421, Philip granted the guardianship and patrimony of Dionisia, daughter of John Beaumond.

8/31/1422, Henry VI became king of England when his father died.

1428, Philip a juror and auditor of London.

3/1432, Philip M.P. for London.

1433-36, Philip an elector for London.

1439, Philip acquired a tenement and nine shops on Leadenhall street called The Green Gate. (S) The Beauties of England and Wales, V10, Pt3, P247.

9/21/1439, Philip Sheriff of London. (S) Calendar of Letter Books for the City of London.

2/6/1440, Philip Malpas and Robert Marshall, sheriffs, heard an inquisition at the Guildhall in the ward of Chepe on petition of Robert Enfeld with respect to felonies. (S) CPRs.

9/1/1440, Philip, Sheriff of London, a leader of the conflict between the city of London and the Dean of St. Martins over the matter of sanctuary at St. Martins-le-Grand. (S) UKNA. [Philip and the other sheriff, Richard Marchall, argued that the church of St Martin and its precinct were within the jurisdiction of the city of London.]

9/10/1440, The sheriffs, Philip and Robert Marchall, were ordered to restore the men to sanctuary. (S) UKNA.

1440, Philip, sheriff and draper of London, died. [Philip gave 125£ to relieve poor prisoners in London, …] (S) A Survey of London, Stow, 1842, P42.

Child of Philip and ?:

i. Philip Malpas (950754), born ~1405 in England.

Monday, December 6, 2010

G20: 950712

950712. Lord Richard Fiennes & 950713. Joan Dacre

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~1425, Richard “Fenys” born in England, s/o 1901424. Sir Roger Fiennes & 1901425. Elizabeth Holand.

1433, Joan born in England, coheir & d/o 1901426. Thomas Dacre & 1901427. Elizabeth Bowet.

6/1446, Richard married Joan.

1448, … to Thomas Dacre and Elizabeth for life, then (a) the advowsons, the manors in Norfolk and Northales, Cove and Bewflory to remain to Richard Fenys, esquire, and Joan his wife, one of their daughters, and heirs of body of Joan, … (S) Feet of Fines for the County of Sussex: V3: 1916.

7/25/1450, John Brykenden of Ashburnham husbandman, James Tysehurst of Ashburnham Yeoman and Thomas Colyn of ashburnham labourer, entered Richard’s close and buildings at Ewhurst, consumed £40worth of crops and threatened his tenants.

2/9/1452, Commission … the king’s adversary of France is about to come in person with a great army … to find out who will contribute to the execution of the king’s purpose at his own costs … to John, earl of Arundel, John, earl of Worcester, … Richard Fenys, Thomas Hoo, … in Surrey and Sussex. (S) CPRs.

10/20/1452, “… Surrey … Endorsement: Richard Fiennes {Fenys}, Sheriff, …”. (S) UKNA.

Aft. 11/8/1452, Richard knighted.

Bef. 1458, Joan heir to her sister Philippe, wife of Sir Robert Fiennes.

1/15/1458, the death of Thomas, 6th Lord Dacre, Richard heir. Humphrey, a younger son of Thomas contested the award.

11/7/1458, Richard declared a baron in right of his wife by patent of King Henry VI. Joan inherited about 60 manors.

1459-1482, Richard summoned to parliament.

1459, Joan age 26.

1460, “… John Neville, of Middleham, knight; …; Margaret of Anjou, Queen of England; …; Richard Fenys of Herstmonceux, knight; …” (S) UKNA.

1460-65, “Richard Fenys, knt., Lord Dacre, and Joan his wife, daughter of Thomas Dacre, knt., and Elizabeth his wife. v. John Heydon …”. (S) UKNA.

7/10/1460, Richard fought at the battle of Northampton, a Yorkist victory, for the earls of Warwick and March. Yorkist forces numbering over 20,000 faced a smaller royal army with their backs against the river Nene. The battle lasted less than an hour. 300 Lancastrians were killed. King Henry VI was captured.

2/17/1461. Richard, a Yorkist, fought at the 2nd battle of St. Albans. In a snow storm, half the Yorkist forces were killed. King Henry VI was left sitting under a tree for the Lancastrian forces. Warwick and the Duke of Norfolk escaped.

3/14/1461, Edward [earl of March] proclaimed himself King Edward IV as the rightful heir.

3/29/1461, Richard a commander of Yorkist forces, with a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage, began the battle of Towton, Yorkshire. In 6 hours thousands fell to the sword, lance, and spear. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil. As many as 28,000 died at the battle. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P279.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

7/30/1462, Commission to … Richard Fenys of Dacre, knight, … to levy sums of money … and to find able watchmen … (S) CPRs.

Aft. 9/1464, Richard, Chamberlain to Queen Elizabeth, wife of Edward IV; and Sheriff of Sussex.

10/13/1470, Henry VI restored to the throne.

10/27/1470, Commission to the king’s kinsmen George, duke of Clarnece, and Richard, Earl of Warwick and Salisbury, Hugh Courtenay, knight, John Arundel, knight, … to enquire into felonies, … Cornwall … Richard Fenys of Dacre, knight, John Fenys, knight, …” (S) UKNA.

4/11/1471, Edward IV entered London and took King Henry prisoner.

4/14/1471, Richard fought at the battle of Barnet fighting for Edward IV. A heavy fog limited visibility. A combined total of 1000 knights died. Both handguns [relatively new] and cannon were used during the fight.

5/4/1471, Richard fought at the battle of Tewkesbury, a Yorkist victory. The battle was at the confluence of the Avon and Severn rivers. The Lancanstrians arrived 1st after a 40 mile march and established a strong defensive position. Seeing an opening, Somerset attacked Edward IV at the Yorkist center. He was flanked and the Lancastrians were routed.

1473, Richard awarded the title Baron Dacre by King Edward.

2/8/1473, “Humphrey Dacre, who was convicted and of high treason in the parliament … later pardoned, … asks that the acts attainting them might be considered null and void … Thomas, Lord Dacre, father of petitioner; …; Ralph, Earl of Westmorland, father of Philippa Dacre; Richard Fenys, Lord Dacre, knight; Joan, wife of Richard Fenys; …” (S) UKNA.

1473, Joan’s uncle Sir Randolph Dacre had his attainder reversed, giving Joan additional lands.

4/8/1475, “… the said Richard Fenys, Knight, in right of the said Johane his wife, and the heires of her bodie lawfullie begotten, be repute, had, named and called the Lord Dacre, … keepe, have, and use the same seat and place in everie of Our Parliaments, as the said Thomas Dacre, Knight, late Lord Dacre, had used and kept.” [The Thomas Dacre being referred to is the grandfather.] (S) Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, V5, P320.

1475, Richard, Privy Councillor to the Queen.

1477-1483, Richard Fenys of Dacre, knight, on commissions for peace in Sussex. (S) Calendar of Patent Rolls.

10/24/1478, “Letter of attorney … By James Hawte, … to Sir Thomas Grey, knight, Marquis of Dorset; Sir Anthony Wydvyle, knight, Lord Rivers; Sir William Hastings, knight, Lord Hastings; Sir Richard Fynys [Fiennes] knight, Lord Dacre; Sir Walter Devereux, knight, Lord Ferrers; …”. (S) UKNA.

1482, Richard, Baron Dacre, summoned to parliament.

11/25/1483, Richard died, leaving his grandson Thomas as heir.

3/8/1485, Joan died, leaving her grandson Thomas as heir.

(S) UKNA. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P731.

Children of Richard and Joan: [5 sons, 1 daughter]

i. John Fiennes (475356), born 1447 in England.

ii. Sir Thomas Fiennes, born ? in England.
Thomas marrie Anned Urswick, widow of John Doreward.
1480, Thomas sheriff of Sussex. (S) UKNA.
1485, Sir Thomas, Lord Dacre, fought at the battle of Bosworth for the Yorkists.
2/8/1525, Thomas died.

iii. Elizabeth Fiennes, born ? in England.
Elizabeth married John, 6th Lord Clinton.

Sunday, December 5, 2010

G20: 950708

950708. Lord William Lovel & 950709. Alesia Deincourt

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1399, William born in England, s/o 3802794. John Lovel & 3802795. Eleanor la Zouche.

1405, Alice born in England, d/o 1901418. Lord John Deincourt & 1901419. Joan Gray.

5/11/1406, Alesia’s father died.

5/1/1407, Licence, for 20 marks paid in the hanaper by Joan Deyncourt, daughter and heiress of Robert Grey of Rotherfeld, ‘chivaler,’, deceased, for her to enfeoff Alesia late the wife of William de Eyncourt, ‘chivaler,’, … of the manor of Duston, co. Northampton, held in chief, … with successive remainder to William Deyncourt her son … Alesia and Margaret his sisters … (S) CPRs.

9/10/1408, John's father died.

12/6/1408, Alesia’s mother died, her brother William the heir.

1414, William heir to his brother John.

1415, William one of the “lances” at the battle of Agincourt with the Duke of Gloucester.

1417, William retained to serve the King Henry V with 6 men at arms, and archers in the wars in France; and before the end of the year to serve at sea with 2 men at arms and 4 archers.

Alice 1st married Ralf Boteler, Lord Sudley.

1422, William served again in the wars in France.

8/31/1422, Henry V died in France at the siege of Meaux.

1422-3, “Divers Counties: D'Eyncourt lands: Extent of the possessions of Alice and Margaret, co-heiresses of William, Lord D'Eyncourt.” [William their brother.]

1423, William, age 24, took livery of his lands after doing homage to Henry VI [age 1]; inherited by descent of John, Lord Lovel his father, and Maud, heir & d/o Robert de Holland, his grandmother.

2/14/1424, William on a commission of oyer and terminer with Warwick, Stafford, and knights William Ferrers of Groby, Ralph Cromwell, … county of Warwick. (S) CPRs.

1424, William, 7th Lord Lovel, married Alice.

1426-1456, William summoned to parliament.

11/6/1429, Henry VI crowned king of England.

1429, William retained to serve the King Henry VI with 29 men at arms, and 80 archers in France.

9/24/1432, Lands of Alice late the wife of William Deyncourt, knight, the elder, who held in dower and otherwise for life after the death of the said William of the inheritance of Alice wife of William Lovell knight and Margaret wife of Ralph Cromwell, knight, the sisters and heirs of William Deyncourt knight the son and heir of John Deyncourt knight the brother and heir of Ralph Deyncourt the son and heir of the said William Deyncourt knight the elder. (S) CFRs.

2/26/1434, William de Lovell, knight, William le Zouche, knight … Commission … to treat with the important persons in the county for a considerable loan to the king … Northampton. (S) CPRs.

3/28/1436, “Joan Gage … to William [Lovel] Lord of Lovell and Holand, …”. (S) UKNA.

1437-38, “William, Lord Lovell of Holand to William West: Grant, …”. (S) UKNA.

10/14/1440, John Thorp of Elyngton, … for not appearing before … late justicies of the Bench, to answer William Lovell, knight, touching a plea of trespass against him … Northampton. (S) CPRs.

3/15/1442, Licence for William, bishop of Lincoln, … to grant to Ralph Cromwell, knight, and Margaret his wife, William Lovell, knight, and Alesia his wife a messuage, garden, … to hold to them and the heirs of Margaret and Alesia by the services due … (S) CPRs.

6/25/1442, William and wife Alice, Ralph and wife Margaret [sister of Alice], and 4 others found a chantry for the souls of “Alice [Alice’s grandmother] late the wife of William Deyncourt, knight, John Deyncourt, knight, and Joan his wife [Alice’s parents] …” (S) CPRs.

11/1442, Alice and her sister Margaret coheirs of their cousin Robert Deincourt.

1447, In consideration of his services “in foreign parts”, and by reason of infirmity, William given a special exemption from attending parliament.

12/12/1447, Licence, for 10£. Paid … for John, archbishop of Canterbury, William, bishop of Lincoln, Hunphrey, duke of Buckingham, William, marquis and earl of Suffolk, William Lovell, knight, Ralph Cromwell, knight, … to found a gild in the parish church of Thame of themselves and others; … (S) CPRs.

1451, William made Constable of the castle of Wallingford on the death of the Duke of Suffolk.

4/16/1452, Commission de kidellis to … William Lovell, knight, lord of Lovell, … (S) CPRs.

6/25/1452, “Letter of attorney by John Talbot, Viscount de Lisle, William, lord of Lovell, …”. (S) UKNA.

Alice Deincourt coheir to her brother William, Lord Deincourt.

6/13/1456, William died.

1456, Alice heir to her sister Margaret, wife of Ralph, Lord Cromwell.

1456, “Alice, widow of William, Lord Lovell v Robert Echard, clerk: Entitlement to certain estates in Nottinghamshire …”. (S) UKNA.

7/28/1459, King Henry VI to Alice Lovell, late the wife of William Lovell, knt., Lady Deyncourt, daughter and heir of John Deyncourt, knt. and her heirs and assigns, grant of a fair at Woodburn, Buckinghamshire. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516.

3/1460, Alice, Lady Lovel, dismissed as governess of Prince Edward of Lancaster as he was “committed to the rule and teaching of men.” (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P238.

Bef. 1/8/1463, Alice married Ralph Boteller, Lord Sudeley, s/o 1901514. Thomas le Boteler & 1901515. Alice Beauchamp.

2/10/1473, Alice died.

(S) Perrage of England, Collins, 1812, P342. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P525, P795. (S) Calendar of Patent Rolls.

Family notes:
• ~1440, William started construction on Minster Lovell manor.

Children of William and Alice: [4 sons]

i. John Lovel (475354), born ~1435 in England.

ii. William, Lord Lovel de Morley, born ? in England.
William married Eleanor Morley, heir & d/o Robert, Lord Morley.

Saturday, December 4, 2010

G18: 184644 Paston-Berry

184644. Sir William Paston & 184645. Agnes Berry


1378, William born in Paston, England, heir & s/o 369288. Clement Paston & 369289. Beatrice de Somerton, d/o §John de Somerton. [Paston is on the coast in Norfolk.]

~1400, Agnes born in England, coheir & d/o 369290. Sir Edmund Berry & 369291. Alice Gerbridge.

1414, William called with others to mediate a dispute over the election process for mayors of Norwich.

4/1/1418, William, a feoffee of Robert Mautby esquire, given specific instructions in Robert’s will.

1419, William a witness to the will of Sir Thomas Hengrave of Suffolk, of whom William was one of Thomas’ feoffees.

3/24/1420, William married Agnes; receiving the manors of Oxned and Marlingford in Norfolk, and Horwellbury in Herts. [Date of marriage contract.]

1421, William a witness to the will of Joan, wife of Sir Thomas Hengrave of Suffolk.

12/29/1421, on her deathbed, Joan, wife of Sir Thomas Hengrave, request William and others to reduce the amount of money designated for her 2nd husband.

7/16/1422, “Grant by Thomas de Kerdeston, to … Edmund Berry, knights, William Paston, …, of the manors of Bulcamp and Henham, …: Suff.” (S) UKNA.

Aft. 1422, William, Serjeant of King Henry VI.

~1426, William was threatened with death. He declared his enemies to be Bishop of Bromholm, Aslak of Sprouston, and widow Julian Herberd of Thormham.

7/1426, William and Thomas Poye granted a market fair and free-warren of the manor of Shipden.

1429, William a Judge of the Court of Common Pleas with a salary of 110 marks [£73, 6s, 8d.], with 2 robes more than the ordinary allowance.

8/24/1432, “Grant by John Aslak, of Crosthweyt, … called 'Stalham Halle', …, which the grantors had of the feoffment of Edmund Berry, knight, William Paston, of Paston, …” (S) UKNA.

9/30/1433, William named supervisor in his father-in-law’s will.

2/16/1434, “1. John Tyrell, kt. 2. Brian Stapilton, kt. John Cottesmore. William Paston. (1) to (2), custody of land (10a.) in Aldeburgh formerly of John Mauteby, esq., deceased.” (S) UKNA.

8/7/1437, “Memorandum, … a grant of Letters of Patents made by Henry the Sixth, … that William Paston … was Sergeant to Hen. the Fourth & Hen. the Fifth, and was one of the Judges of Hen. the Sixth the same year. … That he should not be sent beyond the seas, Nor should be returned of any Jury of attaint ; and besides this there is sett downe that he was of the said King’s Councell for the Duchy of Lancaster.”

1440, Agnes wrote a letter to William about the gentlewoman, an acquaintance of her son John.

1442, Eleanor, widow of Robert Mauteby, wrote to William from Wilby, Northamptonshire.

1/1444, William wrote his will.

8/14/1444, William died, buried in the chapel of Our Lady of Norwich Cathredal. He had possession of East Beckham, Oxnead, Shipden and Ropers in Cromerk, Gresham, Woodhall in Great Palgrave, and Sporle and Sheethall in Cressingham.

Aft. 9/15/1444, A letter of Sir Roger Chamberleyn informs Agnes of the conditions associated with Sir William selling the manor of Walsham.

2/4/1445, Agnes wrote a letter to her son Edmond in law school. Agnes mentions their property in Trunch. (S) The Paston Letters, Davis, 1999, P8. [Edmond died 3/21/1449 in London.]

By 1466, Agnes had created the manor Paston from the lands of Clement Paston, Bromholm Priory, and Hugh atte Fenn.

By 1449, Agnes wrote a letter to her son John. (S) The Paston Letters, Davis, 1999, P22.

1454, Agnes made an indenture with her son John for her daughter Elizabeth to marry John Clopton, paying 400 marks.

Aft. 1469, Agnes moved from Paston to live with her son William in London.

Agnes wrote her will: “A note taken out of the last Will & Testamt of Agnes Berrye, wife to Justice Paston, proving her descent from Gerbredge and Berrye, viz., Also I bequesth to the whight fryers of ye said City of Norwich, for I am there a suster, to helpe to pay hir debts xxli, wch I will be gathered of the arrerage of my lyvelode. Also I bequeath to the Auter of Gracion of the said House, wheras mine husband and I have a ppetuall masse, a vestment which they have for a Prist to judge in of rede satern. Also to the mendinge of ye chappell of our Ladie within the said place, wheras Sr Thomas Gerbredge, my grandfather, & Dame Elizabeth his wife, & Sr Edmond Berrye, my father, & Dame Alice his wife, be buried, and Clement Paston, my sonn.”

8/1479, Agnes died; buried beside William. [The chapel was demolished between 1573–1589.]

(S) A Gen. and Heraldic Hist. … Burke, 1888, P401. (S) The Paston Letters, A.D. 1422-1509, Gairdner, 1904. (S) De Laudibus Legum Angliae:, Fortescue, 1999, Pxiii. (S) DNB, Stephen, 1895. (S) Norfolk Archaeology, V4, 1855. (S) Agnes’ Pedigree. (S) The Paston Family in the Fifteenth Century, Richmond, 2000.

Family notes:
• William’s names appears in court records every year between 1429 and his death.

Children of William and Agnes: [5 sons, 2 daughters]

i. Sir John Paston, born 10/10/1421 in England.
1441, John, age 19, married Margaret Mawtby, heir & d/o John, age 18.
1459, John made an agreement with John Fastolf to build a college at Caister for a fee of 4000 marks.
9/20/1465, John wrote his last letter to his wife from Fleet prison.
2/1466, John released from prison.
5/22/1466, John died.
11/4/1484, Margaret died.

vi. William Paston (92322), born 5/28/1434 in England.

G17: 92322

92322. William Paston & 92323. Lady Anne Beaufort

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5/28/1434, William “Paxton” born in Paston, England, 4th s/o 184644. William Paston & 184645. Agnes Berry.

3/24/1443, Anne born at Baynard castle in London, 3rd d/o 184678. Earl Edmund Beaufort & 184679. Lady Eleanor Beauchamp.

8/14/1444, William’s father died.

4/1449, William at Cambridge, age 15.

1452-53, William wrote his brother John mentioning other family members as well as Richard, Duke of York, Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, and Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset.

1/29/1459, William wrote his brother John mentioning the capture of Lord Rivers.

5/2/1460, William told his brother John in aletter that James Arblaster, also in service of the earl of Oxford, ‘can labor well a-monge lordys’.

9/6/1454 from London, William wrote his brother John mentioning the “pestilence” as being in London, and of being in the King’s chamber when Thomas Bouchier [of the see of Canterbury] “received his cross” and did homage.

William councillor to the 12th Earl of Oxford, John de Vere.

2/23/1462, John de Vere, earl of oxford, tried by John Tiptoft, earl of Worcester, and convicted of treason. After the earl’s execution, William continued in service to the Countess.

5/12/1462, Friar John Mowth wrote John Paston a letter discussing his brother William, living in London, and a knight, Sir Thomas Todenham, that had been put to death.

1/28/1464, William mentioned in a letter of Henry Berry, a relative of his mother, written to his cousin, John Paston, Esq.

1465-71, William JOP for Norfolk.

7/16/1468, William “a devoted adherent to the Lancastrian cause”, had a pardon for all treasons.

~1468, William married Anne.

4/10/1469, William named in a letter of Lord Scales to J. Paston.

Aft. 1469, William’s mother Agnes moved from Paston to live with William in London.

1/1473, William, a feoffee of Elizabeth, dowager Countess of Oxford, refused to give up his lands to Richard, Duke of Gloucester [later Richard III, who had put Elizabeth under duress] even when told it would “cost hym that he loved best.” [William was eventually forced by the Chancery to give up the lands.]

1473-74, William JOP for Norfolk.

5/4/1471, Anne became co-heir of her brother Edmund, Duke of Somerset, killed after the Battle of Tewkesbury.

1472, William M.P. for Newcastle-under-Lyme.

1475, William councillor to the Duke of Buckingham.

1477, William M.P. for Gt Bedwin.

8/1478, William reported that the Duke of Buckingham was making a pilgrimage to Walsingham where he would visit his sister Lady Knyvet at Bokenham.

8/1479, Agnes, William’s mother, died.

11/28/1479, William and his keeper at Marlingford, named James, identifed in a letter of William Lomnor to John Paston.

2/24/1480, William wrote a letter from London to his tenant, John King, at Harwelbury [inherited from his mother.]

7/6/1483, Richard III crowned King of England.

10/1483, The Duke of Buckingham led an insurrection against Richard III.

11/2/1483, The Duke of Buckingham executed.

1478, 1491, William M.P. for Bedwin, Wiltshire.

9/17/1496, William, living at Warwick Inn in London, wrote his will requesting burial at the Blackfriars Priory in London next to his wife Anne.

11/3/1495, William was one of 6 individuals giving depostitions before the Chancellor about the inheritance of the 13th Earl of Oxford. [See 1/1473.]

Bef. 11/28/1496, William died. (S) Will proved.

(S) A Gen. and Heraldic Hist. … Burke, 1888, P401. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P706. (S) Norfolk Archaeology, V4, 1855. (S) Paston Letters: Original Letters, Vs 1-2, Fenn, 1840.

Family notes:
• A letter from the Lady Margaret, Mother to King Henry VII: “By the king’s moder.–Trusty and right webeloved, we greet you well. … there was a full agreement made & concluded, & also put in writinge, between or trusty and right welbeloved Sr John Savile, Knt, and Gilbert Talbot, Esquire, … they ought to have in the right of their wives, daughters and heyers to William paston, Esqr, their late fader, deceassed, …” (S) Norfolk Archaeology, V4, 1855.

Children of William and Anne:

i. Anne Paxton, born ? in England.
1490, Anne married Sir Gilbert Talbot.
10/22/1542, Anne died.

ii. Elizabeth Paxton (46161), born ~1470 in England.

Thursday, December 2, 2010

G20: 950706

950706. Earl John de Veer & 950707. Elizabeth Howard

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4/23/1408, John born in England, 2nd s/o 1901412. Richard de Vere & 1901413. Alice Sergeaux.

1410, Elizabeth born in England, heir & d/o 1901414. Sir John Howard & 1901415. Joan Walton.

Elizabeth’s father died in the Holy Lands while she was an infant [possibly before she was born].

1417, John age 9 at the death of his father. John became a ward of the king in the governance of Thomas, Duke of Exeter.

1424, Elizabeth age 14 at the death of her mother.

3/1/1425, Grant from heir to heir, … of the marriage of John son and heir of Richard, late earl of Oxford, deceased, being a minor in the king’s ward to the following persons, who have lent the king the following sums …  Ralph Cromwell, knight, 250 marks, … Walter Hungerford, knight, 250 marks, and John Tiptoft, knight, 250 marks …

1425, John married Elizabeth, without licence, “by the advice of the said late duke” [Thomas of Exeter] , for which John was fined 3000 marks.

2/18/1426, John de Vere knighted at Leicester.

1429, John, knt., 12th Earl of Oxford, baronial seat at Hedingham castle.

11/6/1429, Henry IV crowned king of England.

1430, John, earl of Oxford, to “move and persuade” notable persons of the counties of Essex and Hertfordshire to lend the king money for his voyage to France to “make a speedy end of his wars there.”

1431, John named to the Privy Council.

10/9/1433, William Dorset of London fined for not appearing in court over a debt to John de Veer, earl of Oxford.

1434, John, Chief Commissioner of Essex.

1435, John given license to travel to the Holy Land.

7/26/1435, Commission to John Tyrell, knight … for the muster of Richard, earl of Warwick, and John de la Veer, earl of Oxford, and their retinues.

1436, John served in France, participating in the rescue of Calais.

2/20/1437, Inspeximus and confirmation, … to John, earl of Oxford, kinsman and heir of Walter de Crepping …

3/22/1437, John asked for relief from paying the last 300£ of his marriage fine.

11/6/1437, Elizabeth granted land in Essex to John Porter.

1439, John, Justice of the Peace in Essex, Hertford, and Cambridge.

5/16/1441, John sailed from Portsmouth to France with York.

3/16/1445, Grant to Richard Veer, knight, of 22£. 4s. parcel of the relief due in the Exchequer by John, earl of Oxford, and Elizabeth, his wife, kinswoman and heir of John Howard, knight, the elder, and Margaret his wife, to wit, daughter of John, son of the said John and Margaret, …

1449, John a guardian of the truce with France and Scotland.

6/15/1450, Commission to John, earl of Oxford, … to array and try all men at arms … in Norfolk, …

3/4/1452, Restitution to John, earl of Oxford, … of the keeping of the park and houses of Haveryng … as freely as any of his ancestors … have pertained time out of mind.

4/13/1454, John one of the commissioners appointed to create Prince Edward as Prince of Wales.

1454, John and others assigned to keep the seas for 3 years.

5/23/1455, John arrived to late to support King Henry IV at the 1st battle of St. Albans. [The battle was fought the pervious day.]

11/1460, John granted retirement from military service.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

1462, John, a Lancanstrian and supporter of King Henry VI, and his eldest son [Aubrey] arrested for treason on the accession of King Edward IV. [John, in communication with the exiled royal family in Scotland, was planning to feign support for King Edward and then kill him.]

2/23/1462, John de Vere, earl of oxford, tried by John Tiptoft, earl of Worcester, and convicted of treason.

2/26/1462, John beheaded and Elizabeth imprisoned.

5/28/1462, Elizabeth granted her freedom.

1471, Most of the family estates granted to Richard, Duke of Gloucester [later King Richard III.]

By 12/1472, Elizabeth lived at the nunnery at Stratford le Bow. From there Elizabeth was taken by the Duke of Gloucester to Stepney, and from there to Walbroke.

1/1473, under duress, Elizabeth conveyed lands [28 manors] to Richard, Duke of Gloucester. (S) The Last Days of Elizabeth Coutness of Oxford, The English Historical Review, 1988.

1473, Elizabeth was returned to the nunnery.

1475, Elizabeth, Lady Scales, died at Stratford Nunnery; buried at Austin Friars in London.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P860. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995. (S) Calendar of Patent Rolls.

Children of John and Elizabeth: [5 sons, 3 daughters]

i. John de Vere, born 1442 in England.
1462, John appointed Lord Great Chamberlain.
John married Margaret Neville, d/o Richard, earl of Salisbury & Alice de Montagu, sister of Richard, “the Kingmaker”.
1464, John, 13th Earl of Oxford by King Edward IV.
1469, John arrested for plotting against the King, then pardoned, and fled to exile in France.
1470, with the return of Henry IV, John appointed Constable of England.
4/14/1471, John a commander at the battle of Barnet; where his brother-in-law, earl of Warwick died, after which he fled to Scotland, then France.
With the aid of King Louis IX, John became a pirate against the English.
1474, John imprisoned in the fortress of Hammes, near Calais.
1484, John escaped and went to the court of exiled Henry Tudor [VII].
8/22/1485, John commanded the center at the battle of Bosworth, a Lancastrian victory where King Richard III was killed.
1485, John appointed Lord High Admiral and Constable of the Tower.
1486, The conveyances made to Richard III by John’s mother were anulled by parliament.
6/16/1487, John commanded the center at the battle of Stoke Field.
6/17/1497, John a commander at the battle of Blackheath [aka battle of Deptford Bridge.]
3/10/1315, John died; his nephew John de Vere his heir [s/o Sir George de Vere & Margaret Stafford].

ii. Jane de Vere (475353), born ~1445 in England.

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

G20: 950698

950698. Baron John Dynham & 950699. Joan Arches

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1406, John born in England, heir & s/o 1901396. John Dinham & 1901397. Philippe Lovel.

1410, Joan born in Oxfordshire, England, d/o 1901398. Sir Richard Arches & 1901399. Joan Arden.

9/5/1417, Joan’s father died.

1421, Joan age 11 at the death of her mother.

2/13/1427, Commission of oyer … on complaint … that John Denham of Notewyll, co. Devon, knight, John Denham, late of the same, esquire, … arrayed in manner of war, assaulted him at Herton, … (S) CPRs.

12/5/1428, John age 22 at the death of his father.

John married Joan.

11/6/1429, Henry VI crowned King of England.

1430-31, John served in the wars in France with the King.

Aft. 1431, Joan sister and heir of her brother John.

1434, John presented to the church of Dunterton, Devon.

1434, … Roger Champernoun, knight, and Philip Cary, knight, knights of the shire for the county of Devon, commissioners to receive the oath of the following; - Philip Courtenay, ‘chivaler.’ John Dynham, ‘chivaler.’ … (S) CPRs.

7/12/1434, Licence, for 6 marks … for John Dynham, knight, to enfeoff John Wolston … of Nutwell, co. Devon, … to re-enfeoff him and Joan his wife … (S) CPRs.

1/18/1436, Commission of array in the county of Devon, to Thomas, earl of Devon, Philip Courtenay, knight, William Bonvill, knight, Nicholas Carreu, knight, John Dynham, knight, … Roger Chambernon, Thomas Carminowe, … [then Thomas also specified for Cornwall.] (S) CPRs.

1436, John served in the wars in France with the King.

1437, John Denham, knight, named in a list of petitioners for war wages for the months of March, April, and May. (S) UKNA.

4/24/1440, John Dynham, knight, co. Devon, with other for 100 marks of silver, received lands and rents from John Dybbe. (S) Feet of Fines.

1442, John presented to the church of Hemyock, Devon.

1444, John charged with breaking into the Abbot’s close.

1445-57, Queen Margaret wrote a letter to Sir John Denham, Knight, about a debt of John Assh. (S) Letters of Queen Margaret of Anjou, 1863, P144.

1452, Joan coheir to her cousin Joan Lee, inheriting lands in Oxfordshire.

1/25/1457, Sir John died; buried in the church of Black Friars, Exeter, Devon.

1460, Joan sued John Langston over some manors.

Joan retained the manor of Souldern as her own inheritance.

1/26/1496, Joan wrote her will.

Bef. 11/3/1497, Joan died, leaving the manor of Souldern to her son John; buried with John.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P286. (S) The Baronetage of England, Wotton, P220. (S) Souldern, A History of the County of Oxford: V6, 1959. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P286. (S) Testamenta Vetusta, Nicolas, 1826, P431.

Family notes:
• Will of Joan: “Jane, late wife of Sir John Dynham, Knight, … son Oliver … Charles Dynham my brother, to Charles Dynham my son; to my son John Carew ; to my daughter Jane Carew ; to my son Edmund Carew, Knight ; to my daughter Jane Zouche … ; to my daughter Katherine Zouche ; … to my daughter Margaret Zouche ; … to my daughter Cecily Zouche ; … to my son William Zouche ; …”
• All 4 sons died without surviving children, their sisters and their descendents the heirs. (S) UKNA.

Child of John and Joan: [4 sons, 4 daughters]

i. Sir John Dynham, born 1430 in England.
1/15/1460 before dawn, Sir John Dynham, a Yorkist, acting on the orders of the earl of Warwick, captured Lord Rivers, his wife the Duchess of Bedford, and their son Anthony Wydville, as well as 300 of River’s men at Sandwich. John returned to his base at Calais with the prisoners.
6/1460, John with Lord Fauconberg and Sir John Wenlock crossed from Calais and occupied Sandwich, establishing a bridgehead for a Yorkist invasion of England.
3/29/1461, John fought for Warwick at the battle of Towton.
6/28/1461, John raised to peerage “ffor his manhood.”
10/1469, John with other magnates who supported Edward IV were secretly summoned to join him at York. From York over 1000 mounted men followed the King to London.
6/1483, John appointed Captain of Calais.
1486, John made Lord Treasurer to King Henry VII. [Served until his death.]
1487, John made Knight of the Garter.
1501, John died. [His sisters’ children were his eventual heirs.]
(S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

ii. Margaret Dinham (475349), born ~1445 in England.

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

G19: 475278

475278. Sir Nicholas Latimer & 475279. Joan Hody

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~1425, John born in Duntish, Dorset, England, s/o 950556. John Latimer & 950557. Margaret Pipard.

~1435, Joan born in England, d/o 950558. Sir John Hody.

Nicholas sheriff of Dorset and Somerset.

12/30/1460, Nicholas fought for Henry IV at the battle of Wakefield where Yorkists the earl of Salisbury was captured, and the Duke of York, and earl of Rutland were killed.

3/29/1461, Nicholas fought as a Lancastrian at the battle of Towton. In 10 hours thousands fell to the sword, lance, and spear. In the aftermath, the bridge over the river collapsed killing many from both sides. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil with as many as 30,000 Lancastrian’s killed.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned King of England.

Nicholas attained.

1463, Nicholas pardoned.

1466, Nicholas granted some of his former lands, and entered the service of the Duke of Clarence [Yorkist, brother of Edward IV.]

6/3/1468, Nicholas’ act of reversal finally recovered Loxton; but Sir Edward Grey [later Viscount Lisle] apparently refused to deliver the property.

6/19/1468, The Duke of Clarence ruled in Nicholas’ favor; while Nicholas had to pay Grey £100 yearly for 7 years.

6/20/1468, Debtor: Nicholas Latimer, knight [of Newton in Sturminster Newton and Buckland Newton Hundreds, Dorset, and held manor of Alton in Sherborne Hundred. Creditor: Edward Grey, Knight. Amount: £100. (S) UKNA.

1470, Nicholas joined the Duke of Clarence in his revolt; again attained.

10/13/1470, Henry VI restored to the throne.

4/11/1471, Edward IV restored to the throne, partly due to Duke Clarence’s return of support.

5/6/1471, Nicholas, a Yorkist, made knight-banneret after the battle of Tewkesbury. The battle was at the confluence of the Avon and Severn rivers. The Lancanstrians arrived 1st after a 40 mile march and established a strong defensive position. Seeing an opening, Somerset attacked Edward IV at the Yorkist center. He was flanked, and Edward, s/o Henry VI, age 18, was killed in the assault. [The only heir-apparent of England to die in battle.]

1472-75, Nicholas a Knight of the Shire for Dorset.

1475, Nicholas served with the Duke of Clarence in France.

2/18/1478, Duke Clarence executed for treason [sentenced pronounced by the Duke of Buckingham.]

1483, Nicholas, Chamberlain of the Duke of Buckingham. (S) Richard III, Horrox, 1991, P162.

7/6/1483, Richard III crowned King of England. Sir Nicholas Latimer was one of the many earls, lords, and knights in the King’s procession through London. (S) Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland, V3, 1808, P398.

By 10/1483, The Duke of Buckingham in a conspiracy with Henry Tudor [later Henry VII] against Richard III. A £1000 reward was put on the Duke’s head.

11/2/1483, The Duke was executed for treason; Nicholas was also named in the associated attainder with treason.

Nicholas pardoned [although he apparently then joined the forces of Henry Tudor.]

8/22/1485, Nicholas fought at the battle of Bosworth as a Lancastrian, ending the 30-year War of the Roses. King Richard III was killed.

10/30/1485, Henry VII crowned King of England. King Henry VII reversed Nicholas’ last attainder, and installed him on the Dorset bench, where he served until his death.

1497, Nicholas joined the southwest insurrection; pardoned after a fine of 400 marks.

2/8/1504, Nicholas wrote his will.

Bef. 4/17/1505, Nicholas of Duntish, co. Dorset, died; the last male of this line, in possession of Zeals Ailesbury manor.

(S) A Gen. and Heraldic Hist. of the Commoners of Great Britain, Burke, 1835, P681. (S) Fasciculus Mervinensis, … Drake, P9. (S) Richard III and His Rivals, Hicks, 1991, P143. (S) Richard III, Ross, 1984, P109.

Child of Nicholas and Joan:

i. Edith Latimer (237639), born ~1455 in England. [Heir]

Sunday, November 28, 2010

G18: 184678

184678. Duke Edmund Beaufort & 184679. Lady Eleanor Beauchamp

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1406, Edmund born in England, s/o 369356. John Beaufort & 369357. Margaret de Holland.

9/1408, Eleanor born in Walthamstow, Essex, England, co-heir & d/o 369358. Richard Beauchamp & 369359. Elizabeth Berkeley.

Eleanor 1st married Thomas Roos, 8th Lord Roos of Helmesley.

1422, Eleanor coheir to her mother, inheriting 1/3 of the baronies of Berkeley, Lisle, and Tyeys.

1426-27, Edmund’s affair with King Henry V’s widow, Katherine of France, created a political scandal.

1427, Edmund granted the county of Mortain in Normandy.

8/18/1430, Thomas Roos died.

1431, Edmund present at Henry VI’s coronation banquet in Paris, France.

1431-53, Edmund held military commands in the French wars.

1436, Edmund invested as a Knight of the Garter

1433, Edmund Ambassador to the King of Scotland.

Bef. 10/31/1434, Edmund married Eleanor.

8/1441, Edmund made Earl of Dorset for his service in the relief of Calais.

6/24/1443, Edmund, created 4th Earl of Somerset, 1st Marquess of Dorset.

5/27/1444, Edmund succeeded his brother as Earl of Somerset.

1444-1452, Edmund summoned to parliament.

1445, Edmund & Eleanor received a papal dispensation to remain married. [3rd degree].

3/1445, Future Queen Margaret sold silver plate to Eleanor in order to pay her sailors that would take her to England.[Eleanor was likely in the large group sent to retrieve Margaret from France. Eleanor and Margaret became very close friends.]

12/1446, The Queen, earl Edmund, Edmund’s uncle the Cardinal, and others counciled King Henry VI against his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester.

1447, Edmund appointed Governor-General of France and of the Duchies of Normandy and Guienne. Edmund took residence at Rouen with a salary of £20,000 a year. This was during a 2-year truce with France.

3/31/1448, Edmund created 1st Duke Somerset.

1449, Eleanor co-heiress to her niece Anne Beauchamp, Countess of Warwick.

7/1449, Charles VII formally declared war on England. [In a little over a month the English would lose 30 towns.]

10/1449, pressed by the French, Edmund gave up Rouen, 6 other strongholds, and a large sum of money “for the deliverance of his person, wife, children, and goods.”

6/24/1450, Edmund surrendered Caen to King Charles of France.

8/1/1450, Edmund returned to London with “many poor soldiers.” The Duke of York accused Edmund of treason.

12/1/1450, Edmund impeached by a York-controlled parliament and taken prisoner to the Tower. Edmund was released the same day by the Queen. [During the day Edmund’s home had been ransacked.]

1451, King Henry appointed Edmund as Captain of Calais. [Calais and Aquitaine were all that remained of English possessions in France.]

8/3/1451, The duchy of Acquitaine fell to the French.

Edmund returned to England.

3/3/1452 at Dartford, in order to avoid a battle against the Duke of York, King Henry ordered the arrest of Edmund. The Queen defended Edmund and he was not arrested. [Had the battle been fought, it would have been the 1st battle of the War of the Roses.]

1452, Edmund granted the Lordship of the Isle of Wight for life.

5/20/1452, Edmund, duke of Somerset, granted a fair at Woking, Surrey. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516.

10/1452, An English army under John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, took control of a large part of Aquitaine.

10/1453, Edmund was the sponsor for King Henry’s son’s baptism [the King was ill, and the Queen had not completed her time of “churching”.]

10/19/1453, after the death of John Talbot, Charles VII retook Bordeaux, ending the 100 Years War. Only Calais remained a possession of England.

11/18/1453, Eleanor de Beauchamp,

3/27/1454, The King was ill, the Duke of York was named Regent, and Edmund was deposed and committed to the Tower.

12/25/1454, King Henry recovered from a semi-comatose state after 16 months. [There is evidence that he never completely recovered.]

2/16/1455, Edmund released from imprisonment.

1455, Richard of York [white rose]formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham [commander], with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces. [The King’s request for support had been sent out too late. Many arrived after the battle.] The Yorkists also had advantages in cannon and archers.

5/22/1455, Edmund slain at the 1st Battle of St. Albans fighting against Richard, Duke of York; buried within the Lady chapel of St. Albans. [His son Henry was wounded.] The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford, and many other nobles. This was the opening battle of a 30-year, Lancaster-York, “War of the Roses”.

3/4/1457, Eleanor named administrator of Edmund’s estates.

Eleanor remarried to Walter Rokesley, Esq.

1463, Eleanor’s son Henry declared support for King Henry VI against King Edward IV; and Eleanor was imprisoned.

3/12/1467, Eleanor died at Baynard’s Castle, London.

(S) The Royal Lineage of Our Noble and Gentle Families, 1883, Foster, P21. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P756. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Edmund and Eleanor:

i. Eleanor Beaufort (92339), born ~1436 in England. [Eldest]

ii. Henry Beaufort, born ? in England.
5/15/1464, Henry was captured and killed at the battle of Hexham. [Never married, 1 natural son by Joan de la Montaign – Charles, ancestor of the “Somerset” families.]

iii. Joan Beaufort, born ? in England.
Joan married King James 1st of Scotland.
Joan married 2nd James Stewart, the Black Knight of Lorn.

iii. Margaret Beaufort born ? in England.
Margaret married Earl Humphrey Stafford.

iv. Edmund Beaufort, born ~1439 in England.
5/6/1471, Edmund, 4th Duke of Somerset, as a Lancanstrian, was taken prisoner at the Battle of Tewkesbury and beheaded 2 days later. The battle was at the confluence of the Avon and Severn rivers. The Lancanstrians arrived 1st after a 40 mile march and established a strong defensive position. Seeing an opening, Somerset attacked Edward IV at the Yorkist center. He was flanked, and Edward, Prince of Wales, age 18, was killed in the assault. [The only heir-apparent of England to die in battle.]

v. Anne Beaufort (92323), born 3/24/1443 at Baynard castle in London, England.

G21: 1901322

1901322. Lord John Clifford & 1901323. Elizabeth Percy

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1389, John born in England, heir & s/o 3802644. Thomas de Clifford & 3802645. Elizabeth de Roos.

1392, John age 3.

~1395, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 3802646. Sir Henry Percy & 3802647. Elizabeth de Mortimer.

8/1403-11/1412, John married Elizabeth.

Aft. 9/21/1411, John’s sister Matilda became the 2nd wife of Richard of Conisburg, 3rd earl of Cambridge, and stepmother to Richard, future 3rd Duke of York [father of King Edward IV.] (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P60.

1412, John and Elizabeth received a papal indult for a portable altar.

9/21/1412, John 1st summoned to parliament as 7th lord of Skipton.

4/9/1413, John attended the coronation of King Henry V.

10/25/1415, John at the battle of Agincourt [and the following siege of Harfleur] in the retinue of the Earl of Marche as a lance with 3 footmen. (S) History of the Battle of Agincourt, Nicolas, 1827, P88.

1416-7, “Parties to Indenture: Indentures between the king and the following for war-service, (actually for the relief of Harfleur). John Clifford.” (S) UKNA.

John the commander that received the surrender of Cherbourg.

1421, John made Knight of the Garter.

8/31/1422, King Henry V died leaving an infant son Henry VI.

3/3/1423, John replaced by John Cassons in the office of verger of “la Garter” to “carry the rod in the king’s presence on days of festival.” (S) Calendar of Patent Rolls.

John, Knight of the Garter, 7th Lord Clifford, wounded in the great tournament of Carlisle between 6 English knight and 6 French knights.

3/13/1421, John slain at the siege of Meaux, France.

5/7/1426, Elizabeth married Sir Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.

10/26/1436, Elizabeth died; buried at Staindrop, Durham.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P218.

Children of John and Elizabeth: [2 sons, 2 daughters]

i. Thomas Clifford, born by 1415 in England.
Thomas, 8th Lord Skipton, married Joan de Dacre, d/o Thomas Dacre & Philippe Neville.
5/22/1455, Thomas died at the 1st Battle of St. Albans fighting as a Lancastrian against the Duke of York.
Children
Baron John Clifford, 9th Lord of Skipton born 1435, nicknamed “the Butcher” for killing Edmund, age 17 and 2nd s/o the Duke of York following the battle of Wakefield.

ii. Mary Clifford (950661), born bef. 1422 in England.

G21: 1901430 Neville-Montagu

1901430. Earl Richard Neville & 1901431. Alice de Montagu

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1400, Richard born in England, s/o 7605706. Ralph Neville & 3802861. Joan Beaufort.

1406, Alice born in England, heir & d/o 3802862. Earl Thomas Montague & 3802863. Eleanor Holand.

Bef. 2/1420 at Orleans, France, Richard married Alice.

2/1421, Richard a carver at the coronation feast of Queen Catherine, wife of King Henry V.

1424, Richard involved in the liberation of King James I of Scotland from England.

1/1425, Richard appointed Constable of the royal castle of Pontefract.

10/21/1425, Richard’s father, Earl of Westmoreland, died. Richard, a younger son by his father’s 2nd marriage, was not the heir.

1426-7, “Thomas Womewill, esquire to Sir Richard Nevill, knight, Warden of the West March: Indenture of military service: Yorks.” (S) UKNA.

1428, Alice age 22 heir to her father’s lands and titles.

5/3/1429, Richard created 5th Earl of Salisbury in right of his wife.

11/6/1429, Richard the Deputy Constable at the coronation of King Henry VI. [The Duke of Bedford was not present.]

6/1431-2/1432, Richard with the King on a trip to Paris.

2/1435, Richard resigned the Wardenship of the East March and the Captaincy of Berwick.

4/22/1435, “This indenture made betwixt Richard [Neville] Erle of Salisbury.. and Thomas Dacre, Knygth, son and heire to ye lorde Dacre …” (S) UKNA. [Thomas is Richard’s nephew.]

12/9/1435, Richard and his brother William attened parliament at Westminster. (S) CPRs, 3/11/1436.

3/10/1436, “… to Richard Nevill, earl of Salisbury and Alice his wife and her issue, …” (S) UKNA.

3/11/1436, In the parliament … the king desired Richard, earl of Salisbury, and William, lord of Fauconberge, ‘chivaler’ to cross into France and serve him there, which agreed to do to certain conditions, and particularly to the consent of their mother Joan, countess of Westmoreland, … unlawful entries … likely to be done in their absence by Ralph, earl of Westmorland, John and Thomas his brothers, … 4000£ … bond … (S) CPRs.

5/1436-11/1437, Richard with Richard, Duke of York [his brother-in-law] in France.

11/1437, Richard, named to the Privy Council, took up residence in London at ‘The Harbour’ in Dowgate. [The main home of the Nevill’s, Bisham Manor, was a days ride from London.]

1438, Richard Richard appointed as a Knight of the Garter

11/1440, Richard, on the death of his mother, took possession of his father’s lands in Yorkshire.

5/4/1442, King Henry VI confirmed Richard’s title of Earl for the dignity of his life.

11/7/1444, Richard and other members of a royal embassy left for France to escort [Queen by proxy wedding] Margaret back to England.

1446, Alice an executor of the will of her kinswoman Maud Clifford, widow of Richard, Earl of Cambridge.

1447, Richard assisted in the arrest of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, at Bury St. Edmonds.

9/1449, Richard retained the services of Sir Walter Strickland and 290 men for the term of his life against all folk, saving allegiance to the King.

2/1452, Earl Richard and many other magnates assembled with Henry VI at Northampton to council the King on how to handle the Duke of York who was leading a force towards London.

1453, Warwick, Richard’s son, had his lordship of Glamorgan, Wales taken away by the king and given to the Duke of Somerset. This caused the Neville clan to side with the Yorks against the Lancasters. [As with most families, there were some members on both sides. York’s claim to the throne was actually stronger than that of the King.]

8/1453, Younger members of Richard’s family and of the Percy family, the two most powerful families of the north, happened upon each other and a war broke out between the clans.

1454, In support of the Duke of York as protector of the Realm while King Henry was “seized with madness”, Richard brought “seven score knights and squires besides other many” to London.

4/1/1454, the Duke of York gave Richard the Great Seal.

4/10/1454, The Duke of York, as Protector, named Richard as Chancellor of England.

1454, “Petitioners: Mayor of Calais; … [Richard Nevill], Chancellor of England.” (S) UKNA.

By 3/1455, King Henry had recovered and Richard was removed as Chancellor. The king pardoned all who had benefited from the Duke of Somerset’s imprisonment [which included Richard.] Richard returned to his castle at Middleham.

1455, Richard [Plantagenet], Duke of York [white rose] formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham [commander], with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces. [The King’s request for support had been sent out too late. Many arrived after the battle.] The Yorkists also had advantages in cannon and archers.

5/20/1455, The forces of York arrived at Royston, Hertfordshire, where they released a letter stating that they meant no harm to the King, and had raised an army and moved south in self defense against the Duke of Somerset.

5/22/1455, Richard fought at the 1st battle of St. Albans [with his son Richard]. York and Salisbury attacked from the East with little success. Warwick led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear by breaking into the town from the side. The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford [commander of the vanguard], and many other nobles. King Henry, wounded, submitted to Yorkist control. Queen Margaret and 2-year-old son Edward went into exile. This was the opening battle of a 30-year, Lancaster-York, War of the Roses. [Abbot Whethamstead of St. Albans gave and eyewitness account of the events.]

7/9/1455, At parliament called by the Duke of York, again Protector, the York-aligned magnates renewed their oaths of allegiance to the king.

2/1456, Henry VI revoked the Duke of York’s appointment as Protector.

8/1456, Richard returned to Middleham castle.

2/1458, York [Lieutenant of Ireland], Richard [Salisbury] and Warwick [Captain of Calais] were commanded by King Henry to endow a chantry for the souls of those killed at the battle of St. Albans as well as compensate financially the families of Clifford, Northumberland, and Somerset.

3/24/1458, “Loveday”, the King and Queen and Yorkist leaders walked hand-in-hand through the streets of London.

11/1458, Richard’s son met with him at Middleham before returning to Calais to inform him of the Queen’s attempt on his position as Captain of Calais and on his life.

11/23/1458, soon after All-Saints day, Richard at castle Middleham met other powerful men. They agreed to support the Duke of York’s claim to the throne. (S) Journal of the Architectural, … Historical Society, 1857, P83.

5/10/1459, Richard wrote his will.

9/23/1459, Richard [Salisbury] fought the battle of Blore Heath in western England [Shropshire], where his opponent Lord Audley [James Touchet] was slain and two of his sons captured. Richard faced a superior force in numbers, but one which did not have the experience of his forces. Richard strategically pinned Audley’s forces on a steep brook embackment and decimated them with arrows, causing many others to flee. 2000-3000 were slain in a prolonged battle, mostly on Audley’s side.

Richard then evaded other royal forces of the Queen, went to maket Drayton [where he learned that his sons Thomas and John had been captured at Acton Bridge], and then and met up with York at Ludlow. Warwick arrived soon afterwards.

The Yorkists, 25,000 strong, made an advance on Worcestor. They encountered a superior royalist force and withdrew to Ludford bridge near Ludlow. King Henry sent an offer of pardon to York at Ludford, which did not include pardons for Richard and his associates.

10/10/1459, The royal forces appeared opposite the forces of York.

10/12/1459, During the night, Andrew Trollope, the Yorkist vanguard commander and his forces deserted. Salisbury made his way, with Warwick and the Earl of March [s/o the Duke of York and future Edward IV], to Devon, then by sea, to Guernsey [a channel island] and Calais, where Warwick was still Captain. The Duke of York made his way to Ireland with is son Rutland.

11/20/1459, Richard and his sons attained.

1/28/1460, Lord Rivers, his wife the Duchess of Bedford, and their son Anthony Wydville were brought before Salisbury, his son Wawick, and March in Calais; having been captured in Sandwich.

6/1460, Warwick and Salisbury sent forces to capture Sandwich and establish a beachhead for an invasion.

6/26/1460, Richard recrossed the Channel back to England with Warwick and March, and landed at Sandwich with 2000 men. From there they went to Canterbury.

7/2/1460, The Salisbury-Warwick-March army reached London with a force of 40,000, of which 500 were mounted.

7/5/1460, Lord Fauconberg, brother of Salisbury, left London heading north with 10,000 men. Soon after Warwick and March followed, leaving Salisbury in London with 2000 men.

9/8/1460, The Duke of York returned from Ireland.

10/10/1460, During parliament, York rode into London at the head of a large retinue. York decared himself king. Ultimately, York was named successor to Henry. [The Yorkist attainders were also erased.] Warwick and Salisbury did not support York’s claim to the throne. The Queen quickly raised an army in response to her son being disinherited.

11/1460, The Queen’s army of 20,000 marched south through York ravishing the countryside.

12/9/1460, York and Salisbury rode north out of London at the head of 6000 men heading for Sandal castle near Wakefield, arriving on the 21st. There they would wait for March and reinforcements from Shrewsbury.

12/29/1460, The Lancastrians infiltrated 400 men into the ranks of the Yorkists.

12/30/1460, Richard, captured at the battle of Wakefield, his son Thomas killed. The Duke of York was killed, as well as his son Edmund, Earl of Rutland. About 1000 were slain, evenly split between the sides.

Richard , 5th Earl of Salisbury, was taken to Prontefract castle where he was killed by commoners while escaping.

1462, Alice died; buried with Richard at Bisham Priory, Berkshire.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P579. (S) Dictionary of Battles, Eggenberger, 1967. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Richard and Alice: [6 sons, 6 daughters]

i. Cecily Neville, born 1424 in England. [Eldest daughter.]
1434, Cecily married Henry de Beauhamp, s/o 369358. Earl Richard Beauchamp & 369359. Elizabeth Berkeley.

7/28/1450, Cecily died.

ii. Earl Richard Neville (1901430i), born 11/22/1428 in England.

iii. Alice Neville (950715), born ~1430 in England.

G21: 1901430ii

1901430ii. Earl Richard Neville, “the Kingmaker”

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11/22/1428, Richard born in England, s/o 1901430. Earl Richard Neville & 1901431. Alice de Montagu.

1434, Richard bethrothed to Anne Beauchamp, d/o 369358. Richard Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick & [2nd wife] Isabel le Despenser.

6/11/1446, Richard’s brother-in-law, Henry, 1st Duke of Warwick, died, leaving as his heir his 2-year-old daughter Anne. [Henry married to Richard’s sister Cecily, Richard married to Henry’s sister Anne.]

5/22/1455, Richard fought with his father at the 1st battle of St. Albans. Richard led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear.

1/3/1449, Richard’s neice Anne, a minor, heir to the Duke of Warwick, died.

Anne, Richard’s wife, named as heir to her brother Henry. [Her 3 half-sisters protested to no avail, Anne was the rightful heir due to her being the only full sibiling.] Richard now owned land in 18 counties and over 20 castles; with his seat at Warwick castle, a massive fortress. The greatest concentration of his lands were in the western midlands and south Wales. An import lordship was that of Glamorgan, Wales.

1449, Richard made 16th Earl of Warwick and named the Constable of Calais.

1453, A dispute began between Earl Richard and the Duke of Somerset over ownership of Glamorgan in Wales, which the king had just granted to Somerset. This caused the Neville clan to side with the Yorks against the Lancasters. [As with most families, there were some members on both sides.]

8/1453, Members of Richard’s family and of the Percy family, the two most powerful families of the north, happened upon each other and a war broke out between the clans.

1454, The Duke of York named protector of the Realm while King Henry was “seized with madness”.

By 3/1455, King Henry had recovered and Salisbury [Richard’s father] was removed as Chancellor.

1455, Richard of York [white rose] formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces.

5/20/1455, The forces of York arrived at Royston, Hertfordshire, where they released a letter stating that they meant no harm to the King, and had raised an army and moved south in self defense against the Duke of Somerset.

5/22/1455, Richard fought at the 1st battle of St. Albans [with his father Richard], and became very powerful after the victory. The Yorkists initiated an assault. Richard led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear. The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford, and many other nobles. This was the opening battle of the 30-year, Lancaster-York, War of the Roses. King Henry submitted to Yorkist control.

4/20/1456, King Henry appointed Richard the Captain of Calais, the highest military appointment due to its strategic location.

8/1456, After helping suppress a Scottish invasion, Richard went to Calais.

1457, Richard used his 10-ship fleet to suppress piracy in the channel and to defeat a Spanish fleet. [During this time Richard also built a “lavish” home in London where he was gaining popularity.]

2/1458, York [Lieutenant of Ireland], Richard [Salisbury] and Warwick [Captain of Calais] were commanded by King Henry to endow a chantry for the souls of those killed at the battle of St. Albans. Warwick also paid the Clifford family 1000 marks.

3/24/1458, “Loveday”, the King and Queen and Yorkist leaders walked hand-in-hand through the streets of London.

1458, Richard began negotiations with Philip, Duke of Burgundy.

Warwick was called to London by the Queen to respond to accusations of piracy against the Germans. Richard arrived with 600 armed soldiers.

7/31/1458, A formal inquiry into Richard’s actions was started by the Council. [The next day Londoners rioted against the Queen, and in support of Richard.]

Fall/1458, Richard was in London when a possible attempt on his life was made [it may have been an accident.] Richard was accused by the Queen of starting the incident and ordered his arrest. Richard escaped back to Calais.

11/1458, The Queen attempted to revoke Richard’s appointment at Calais. Richard returned to London and defended his appointment on the grounds that only the Parliament could revoke his assignment. On leaving the council, Richard was attacked by men of Somerset and Wiltshire, but again escaped.

9/21/1459, Warwick, with 200 men-at-arms and 400 archers – mostly professional soldiers, entered London in support of his father and the Duke of York. From there, with a larger army, Richard headed for Warwick castle to rendezvous with his father. The Queen’s forces were already at Warwick castle, and Richard turned to head for Ludlow and meet up with York.

9/1459, Warwick met his father and York at Ludlow castle.

The Yorkists, 25,000 strong, made an advance on Worcestor. They encountered a superior royalist force and withdrew to Ludford bridge near Ludlow. King Henry sent an offer of pardon to York at Ludford, which did not include pardons for Salisbury and his associates.

10/10/1459, The royal forces appeared opposite the forces of York.

10/12/1459, During the night, Andrew Trollope, the Yorkist vanguard commander and his forces deserted. Salisbury made his way, with Warwick and the Earl of March [s/o the Duke of York and future Edward IV], to Devon, then by sea, to Guernsey [a channel island] and Calais, where Richard was still Captain. The Duke of York made his way to Ireland.

11/20/1459, Warwick and his father attained.

In response to an attack by the Duke of Somerset, Richard attacked Sandwich. Then Somerset, with 1000 men under Trollope attacked and captured Guisnes castle. Richard, in return, captured Somerset’s commanders Lord Audley and Humphrey Stafford.

1/28/1460, Lord Rivers, his wife the Duchess of Bedford, and their son Anthony Wydville were brought before Salisbury, his son Wawick, and March in Calais; having been captured in Sandwich.

3/1460, Richard traveled to Waterford, Ireland to meet with the Duke of York where they planned a two-pronged invasion.

6/1/1460, Richard arrived back in Calais by sea.

6/1460, Warwick and Salisbury sent forces to capture Sandwich and establish a beachhead for an invasion.

6/26/1460, Warwick recrossed the Channel back to England with his father and Marche, and landed at Sandwich with 2000 men. From there they went to Canterbury.

7/2/1460, The Salisbury-Warwick-March army reached London with a force of 40,000, of which 500 were mounted.

7/5/1460, Lord Fauconberg, brother of Salisbury, left London heading north with 10,000 men. Soon after Warwick and March followed, leaving Salisbury in London with 2000 men.

7/10/1460, Richard attacked the royalist forces at Northhampton. Lord Grey of Ruthin [later Earl of Kent], commanding a Lancastrian force, turned sides and helped the Yorkists. The Duke of Buckingham and many Lancastrian nobles died. King Henry was taken to London under Yorkist control. The Queen fled Coventry for Scotland.

10/28/1460, Henry named as his successor Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, who had returned from exile in Ireland. [The Yorkist attainders were also erased.]

12/9/1460, Warwick remained in charge in London while his father and York left northward to meet the advancing army of the Queen.

12/30/1460, Richard’s father captured [and later killed] at the battle of Wakefield. [The Duke of York was also killed.] Richard became 6th Earl of Salisbury, and the richest magnate in the history of England, owning twice what any other had possessed. March became the 4th Duke of York.

2/2/1461, March defeated Lancastrian forces at the battle of Mortimore’s Cross. Owen Tudor, Henry VI’s stepfather, was captured and executed.

2/17/1461, The forces of Queen Margaret made a surprise attack on Richard’s forces at the 2nd battle of St. Albans. In a snow storm, half the Yorkist forces were killed. Richard, and John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, escaped. King Henry VI was left sitting under a tree for the Lancastrian forces.

2/27/1461, Edward of York, s/o the slain Duke, joined with Richard’s remaining forces of about 4000, returned to London.

3/14/1461, Edward [earl of March] proclaimed himself King Edward IV as the rightful heir.

3/28/1461, Richard defeated by a Lancastrian army commanded by Lord Clifford at the battle of Ferrybridge. Richard was wounded in the leg. Afterwards, Warwick killed his horse in full view of his soldiers, saying he would rather die on foot with his men than give another inch. With Edward’s support the tide turned and Lord Clifford was killed [Clifford had murdered Edward’s younger brother.]

3/29/1461, March and Warwick’s forces, with a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage, began the battle of Towton, Yorkshire. In 10 hours thousands fell to the sword, lance, and spear. Both March and Warwick were involved in hand-to-hand combat. About dusk, Yorkist reinforcements, fresh to battle, arrived, sent by the earl of Norfolk. The arrival sent the tired Lancaster forces fleeing. In the aftermath, the bridge over the river collapsed killing many from both sides. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil. As many as 28,000 died at the battle, 8000 Yorkists. [Another estimated 12,000 Lancastrians died in the aftermath of the main battle.]

King Henry, Queen Margaret, and Prince Edward fled to Scotland.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

7/1461, Richard suppressed a Lancastrian incursion in Northumberland, capturing the castles of Alnwick and Bamburgh.

5/1462, Warwick seized a castle in Scotland. [Queen Margaret were now in France.]

10/1462, Queen Margaret landed at Bamburgh with a small invasion force, retaking its castle as well as Alnwick. The Queen then traveled north to Berwick to meet up with King Henry and the Lancastrian supporters.

11/1462, The Lancastrians in retreat, Warwick captured Warkworth castle to use as a base or operations in the north.

By 1/6/1463, Richard had captured Alnwick and Dunstanburgh. [These were soon back in Lancastrian hands due to their governors switching sides.]

7/1463, Queen Margaret returned to France to seek support from the Duke of Burgundy.

6/23/1464, Warwick again appeared before Alnwick castle demanding its surrender. Warwick proceeded to take Dunstanburgh and Norham.

9/4/1464 at Reading, with Warwick putting pressure on Edward IV to conclude a marriage alliance with France, Edward announced that he was already secretly married to Elizabeth Wydville – a marriage disliked by most nobility.

Warwick wrote a letter to King Louis XI telling him that he and the King were not on good terms.

7/13/1465, King Henry VI was captured. He was then taken to Islington to Warwick, who took him to the Tower.

1/1466, Warwick was in disagreement with Edward IV over foreign alliances. Warwick wanted an alliance with France, Edward with Burgundy.

4/14/1466, Richard sent to Burgundy to investigate a potential marriage of King Edward’s sister Margaret. While in France, Warwick met with King Louis XI at Calais and signed a 2-year truce.

1466, Edward IV replaced Warwick’s uncle as Treasure of England with his stepfather, Earl Rivers.

1467, Warwick proposed his daughters as brides of Edward IV,s brothers. [King Edward refused.]

1469, Warwick and King Louis XI had a secret agreement that Warwick would be given Holland and Zeeland if he could overthrow Edward IV.

1469, Warwick and his family returned to Calais.

6/28/1469, Warwick, back in England, raised an army to march against northern rebels.

7/4/1469, Warwick, with a papal approval for his daughter to marry Clarence, brother of the King, returned to Calais.

7/16/1469, Warwick returned to England, going 1st to Canterbury.

7/26/1469, Warwick’s forces, meeting up with those of Sir John Conyers, defeated the forces of Pembroke at the battle of Edgecote. The earl of Pembroke was captured and executed. The earl of Devon fled but was later captured and executed. Soon after, King Edward was captured at Olney.

8/12/1469, Warwick executed captured Sir John Wydville and Earl Rivers [brother and father of the Queen.]

10/1469, Warwick released Edward IV from captivity.

3/8/1470, Both Warwick and Clarence were given commissions of array to raise armies to suppress a revolt [which they had secretly instigated.]

3/12/1470, King Edward defeated Sir Robert Welles at the battle of Empingham and captured documents showing Warwick and Clarence were behind the uprising.

3/25/1470, Edward removed Warwick’s brother as earl of Northumberland; offering a Marquess title [with no land] and the marriage of his eldest daughter to John’s son [George Neville] in replacement.

4/3/1470, Warwick and Clarence put to sea from Exeter [having had most of their ships captured at Southampton.]

5/1/1470, Warwick landed at Honfleur and was greeted by the royal Admiral of King Louis XI.

6/8/1470, King Louis began negotiations between Warwick and Queen Margaret at Amboise on the Loire. Louis would support Warwick if they restored Henry VI and pledged support of England against Burgundy.

7/15/1470, at Angers, France, Warwick met with Queen Margaret, offered apologies, and was pardoned. It was agreed that Prince Henry would marry Warwick’s daughter Anne.

9/9/1470, Warwick with a fleet of 60 ships sailed from La Hogue, Normandy for England. [A storm had scattered the Burgundian fleet guarding the coast of France, and the English fleet guarding the channel.]

9/13/1470 Warwick’s invasion force landed at Plmounth on the west part of the southern coast. [Soon afterwards Warwick’s brother, John, Marquess of Montague, changed sides back in support of Warwick.] King Edward IV, realizing his position, headed for Norfolk, from which he sailed for Holland [Burgundian territory.]

10/6/1470, Warwick’s forces entered London unopposed [and by messenger had already released Henry VI from prison.]

10/13/1470, Henry VI restored to the throne, Warwick carrying the king’s train in the procession.

3/14/1471, Edward IV landed his forces at Ravenspur, where he burned his ship to indicate he did not plan to retreat.

3/23/1471, Warwick forced Clarence to deliver some of his property to Queen Margaret and Prince Edward.

3/29/1471, Edward IV and his army arrived at Coventry where Warwick had his forces.

4/3/1471, Some of Edward’s forces intercepted the earl of Oxford at Leicester and defeated him. Clarence decided to return support to his brother Edward IV, and arrived at Coventry with 12,000 men. Not able to lure Warwick out of Coventry, Edward decided to take London. [Warwick followed 2 days later.]

4/11/1471, Edward IV entered London and took King Henry prisoner.

4/13/1471, Edward moved north out of London. His advanced forces skirmished with Warwick’s advanced forces at Barnet, 10 miles north of London. Arriving at night, the two main forces unknowingly camped next to each other.

4/14/1471, Richard, Earl of Warwick, “the King maker”, age 42, now head of the Lancastrian army, killed at the battle of Barnet against royalist forces of Edward IV. A heavy fog limited visibility. A combined total of 1000 knights died. Both handguns [relatively new] and cannon were used during the fight.

Richard buried at Bisham, Berkshire.

(S) Warwick the King-maker, Philippe de Comines, 2005. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Richard and Anne:

i. Isabel, born 9/5/1451 at Warwick castle, England.
7/11/1469 in Calais, Isabel married George, Duke of Clarence, brother of King Edward IV.
12/22/1476, Isabel died.

ii. Queen Anne, born 6/11/1456 at Warwick castle, England.
7/25/1470, Anne betrothed to Prince Edward, s/o King Henry VI, in Angers Cathedral, France. [Both great-grandchildren of John of Gaunt – a dispensation would be required to consummate the marriage.]
12/13/1470 in France, Edward and Anne married by the Grand Vicar of Bayeux.
5/4/1471, Edward killed at the battle of Tewkesbury.
7/12/1472, Anne married 2nd, Richard [later King Richard III], Duke of Gloucester, brother of King Edward IV.
3/1485, Anne died.

Friday, November 26, 2010

G18: 184692

184692. Duke John Howard & 184693. Katherine de Moleyns

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~1415, John born in England, s/o 369384. Robert Howard & 369385. Margaret Mowbray.

~1420, Katherine born in England, d/o 369386. Sir William Moleyns & 369387. Margery ?.

1440, John married Katherine.

1451, John accompanied Lord L’isle to Guienne, France.

John 1st married Catherine.

7/17/1453, John at the battle of Chatillon,France, in service to John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk. The French imployed a new “rock launcher” and decisively defeated the English, ending the hundred years war. John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, died in the battle.

1455, John elected Knight of the Shire for Norfolk.

3/16/1461, Sir John Howard met up with Edward [IV] at Cambridge, arriving from the abbey of Bury St Edmunds where he had received £100 in support of Edward.

3/29/1461, John, a Yorkist, knighted at the battle of Towton by Edward [IV].

6/28/1461, Edward IV, age 19, crowned King of England.

1461, John appointed Constable of Colchester Castle, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk; and one of the King’s Carvers. John was also appointed to the King’s council, a small select group of advisors.

8/1461, John involved in a brawl with John Paston, and used his influence with Edward IV against Paston.

11/1461, John imprisoned after giving offence at the election of Paston.

1462, John appointed Constable of Norwich Castle and received grants of several manors forfeited by the Earl of Wiltshire. He was joined by William Neville, Baron Fauconberg and Lord Clinton to “keep the seas”, taking Croquet and the Isle of Rhe.

1464, John helped Norfolk secure Wales for Edward IV; bought the reversion of Bamburgh Castle; and was with Edward IV and his court at Reading.

11/3/1465, Catherine died at Stoke Nayland.

1466, John appointed Vice Admiral for Norfolk and Suffolk; and was in Calais part of the year.

Bef. 1/22/1467, John married 2nd Margaret, d/o Sir John Chedworth, widow.

4/1467, John elected Knight of the Shire for Suffolk.

11/1467, John appointed Envoy to France; and Treasurer to the Household [held until 1474.]

6/1468, John attended Margaret of York to Flanders for her marriage to Charles, Duke of Burgundy.

7/26/1469, Edward IV’s army was defeated at the battle of Edgecote Moor by the the earl of Warwick, who had put Edward on the throne, but was in rebellion. Warwick had Edward put under house arrest.

10/1469, John with other magnates who supported Edward IV were secretly summoned to join him at York. From York over 1000 mounted men followed the King to London.

3/1470, John Howard and Lord Rivers took forces to Southampton and captured all the vessels of Warwick in the port including the Trinity.

10/15/1470, John created Baron de Howard.

10/30/1470, King Henry VI restored to the throne by the forces of Warwick. John took refuge at Colchester.

3/1471, John supported Edward IV’s return from exile to become King.

4/1471, John emerged from Colchester to join the forces of Edward IV moving on London.

4/11/1470, John with the forces of King Edward IV entered London where the Archbishop of Cantebury deposed King Henry VI.

4/14/1471, John badly wounded at the battle of Barnet where the earl of Warwick , “the Kingmaker”, was killed.

5/4/1471, Edward IV defeated the forces of Henry VI at the battle of Tewkesbury to regain the throne of England.

6/1471, John appointed Deputy Governor of Calais.

7/1474, John with Edward IV in his invasion of France. After the truce of Amiens, John received a pension from Louis XI and remained in France, briefly, as a hostage. On his return to England, John was granted manors in Suffolk and Oxfordshire forfeited by John de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

1477-79, John sent to France on multiple trips.

11/19/1479, John Howard granted a market and fair at Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516.

1481, John coheir to his cousin Anne Mowbray; heiress & d/o John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.

11/15/1482, John summoned to parliament.

4/1483, John carried the king’s banner at the funeral of Edward IV, pledging allegiance to Richard III.

5/13/1483, John appointed High Steward of the Duchy of Lancaster and a Privy Councillor.

6/28/1483, John created Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshall of England. [Anne Mowbray, only d/o John, Duke of Norfolk, died before consummation of her marriage to the Duke of York. The title went to her closet relative, John Howard.]

7/6/1483, Richard III crowned King of England. John acted as High Steward, bore the crown, and as Earl Marshall was the King’s Champion.

John persuaded Elizabeth Wydville [Woodville] to let the young Duke of York join his brother Edward V in the Tower.

By 9/1483, Edward V and his younger brother were “put to silence in the Tower of London.” (S) Entry by Robert Ricart, Recorder of Bristol. [John was possibly involved in the murder of the two princes.]

9/12/1484 at Nottingham, John appointed Chief of Commissioners to negotiate with James III of Scotland.

8/22/1485, John commanded the vanguard in the battle of Bosworth; killed in the battle; buried in the conventual church at Thetford, Norfolk. In the battle, Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, after invading southwest Wales, raised an army of 5,000. John, in the forces of Richard III, was also allied with the Duke of Norfolk and the Earl of Northumberland and an army of 10,000. Thomas Lord Stanley and his brother William commanded 6,000 reserves. The Stanley’s turned to support Henry. Northumberland did not engage other forces. The Yorkist were overwhelmed. Richard III and the Duke of Norfolk were killed. Richard’s royal crown was placed on Henry’s head. This battle ended the 30-year War of the Roses.

1494, Margaret died; buried at Stoke Nayland.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P438. (S) The History and Antiquities of Boston, Thompson, P373. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of John and Catherine:

i. Thomas Howard (92346), born 1443 in England.

ii. Anne Howard, born ? in England.
Anne married Edmund Georges.

iii. Isabel Howard, born ? in England.
Isabel married Sir Robert Mortimer.

iv. Jane Howard, born ? in England.
Jane married Sir John Timperley.

v. Margaret Howard, born ? in England.
Margaret married Sir John Wyndham.

Children of John and Margaret:

ii. Katherine Howard, born ? in England.
Katherine married Sir John Bouchier, 2nd Lord Bouchier, stepson of her brother Thomas.
Children:
Jane Bouchier, born ? in England.
She married Sir Edmund Knyvet, gs/o her brother Thomas.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

G17: 92346

92346. Duke Thomas Howard & 92347. Elizabeth Tilney & 475358. Sir Humphrey Bourchier

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1443, Thomas born in Stoke Neyland, Suffolk, England, s/o 184692. John Howard & 184693. Catherine de Moleyns.

~1445, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 184694. Sir Frederick Tilney & 184695. Elizabeth Cheney.

2/21/1447, John Say given wardship and marriage of his step-dughter Elizabeth.

~1450, Humphrey born in England, s/o 950716. Lord John Bourchier & 950717. Marjorie Berners.

4/11/1451, “Indenture, marriage settlement. 1) John Bourgchier, kt. 2) John Say esqs. Laurence Cheyne esqs. Humfrey, s. of (1) to espouse Eliz., d. of Frederyk Tylney, esq., "that is to God passed", she being ward of J.S., before next All Saints. … If Humfrey die before Eliz. 14 yrs., she is to marry next son, or in default to be returned unmarried with any property. …” (S) UKNA.

10/1470, Thomas, Treasurer of the household of Edward IV, fled to Colchester when Henry VI was briefly restored to the throne. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P376.

4/14/1471, Humphrey Bourchier, a Yorkist, slain at Barnet Field, buried at Wesminster Abbey. Thomas Howard was “sore hurt” fighting on the Yorkist side for Edward IV. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P398.

1471, Thomas went to France in support of Charles, Duke of Burgundy. [Thomas returned to England in 1472.]

2/28/1472, Elizabeth wrote a will: “I Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Frederick Tilney, …”.

4/1472, Thomas Esquire of the Body of Edward IV.

4/30/1472, Thomas married Elizabeth.

5/8/1472, Elizabeth wrote another will: “Dame Elizabeth Howard, daughter and heir of Frederick Tilney, and now wife of Thomas Howard, son and heir of John, Lord Howard, …”. [There is a 3rd will of 1506 attributed to her, but this was actually the will of Elizabeth Talbot, widow of Duke of Norfolk.]

6/1475, Thomas led 6 men-at-arms and 200 archers to join the king's army in France.

1476, Thomas made Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

1/18/1478, Thomas knighted and created by King Edward IV at the marriage of the king’s son, the Duke of York to Lady Anne Mowbray.

4/9/1483, King Edward IV died; succeded by his 12 year old son Edward V.

7/6/1483, Richard III became King of England, deposing Edward V. Thomas carried the Sword of State at the coronation.

By 9/1483, Edward V and his younger brother were “put to silence in the Tower of London.” (S) Entry by Robert Ricart, Recorder of Bristol.

1483, Thomas created Earl of Surrey, invested as a Knight of the Garter, and appointed Lord Steward of the Household.

8/22/1485, Thomas fought [with his father] on the losing side at Bosworth against Henry VII. [His father was killed, he was take prisoner, attained, and taken to the Tower in London.]

10/30/1485, King Henry VII crowned King of England.

6/1487, Thomas refused a chance to escape from the Tower, which was noted by King Henry VII.

1/1488, Thomas released from the Tower when he agreed to command against the Scots. He was restored as Earl of Surrey.

5/1488, Thomas was sent to put down a taxation rebellion in Yorkshire. [They had slain Henry Percy, earl of Northumberland – Thomas had the leader executed.]

1490, Thomas’ Knight of the Garter status restored.

1492, Thomas suppressed a rebellion at Acworth in Wales.

4/4/1497, Elizabeth died.

1497, Thomas invaded Scotland after James IV had laid siege to Norham castle. Thomas challenged the Scot king to battle, but eventually had to retreat due to weather.

6/25/1501, Thomas confirmed as Lord Treasurer and made a member of the Privy Council.

1501, Thomas sent to arrange the marriage terms of Henry VII’s daughter Margaret to James IV of Scotland.

Thomas married 2nd Agnes Tilney, cousin of Elizabeth, gd/o Hugh Tilney of Boston, brother of Elizabeth’s father Frederick.

1503, Thomas escorted Princess Margaret to Edinburgh, Scotland.

10/1508, Thomas sent to Antwerp to negotiate the marriage of Henry VII’s daughter Mary with the Prince of Castile.

3/1509, Thomas on a commission to conclude a treaty with France.

4/1509, Thomas an executor of King Henry VII’s will.

6/24/1509, Henry VIII crowned King of England.

7/1510, Thomas appointed as Earl Marshall.

11/1511, Thomas on a commission of peace to treat with Ferdinand of Aragon.

9/1512, Thomas, at odds with [future Cardinal] Thomas Wosley, left the Court of Henry VIII.

9/9/1513, Henry VIII went to France about his claim to the French throne. While he was gone King James of Scotland invaded with 30,000 men. At the battle of Flodden Field, English longbow versus Scottish spear, Thomas, as Lieutenant General of the North, repulsed the attack with 20,000, killing over 10,000 Scots and the king. [The last great battle won by the longbow.]

2/1/1514, Thomas, 70 years old, reacquired his father’s title of Duke of Norfolk, and restored as Earl Marshall.

11/16/1515, Thomas one of the escorts of Thomas Wosley as he was inducted as a Cardinal at Westminster.

2/1516, Elizabeth was godmother to Princess Mary [future Queen “Bloody Mary”.]

5/1517, Thomas suppressed a riot in London known as “Evil May Day”.

1520-21, Thomas served as Guardian of the Realm while King Henry returned to France.

5/1521, while acting as Lord High Steward, Thomas was compelled to put his friend Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham to death on charges of treason.

5/1522, Thomas sent as an ambassador to Holy Roman Emperor, Carlos V.

4/1523, Thomas attended parliament [but he had resigned as Treasurer.]

5/21/1524, Thomas died at Castle Framlingham, Norfolk.

6/26/1524, Thomas buried at Thetford Priory, Norfolk.

(S) Fifty Ancestors of Henry Lincoln Clapp, 1902, P73. (S) UKNA, East Susses Record Office, DAN. (S) The History of Long Melford, Parker, 1873, P68. (S) Visitation of Norfolk.

Children of Humphrey and Elizabeth:

i. Anne Bouchier (237679), born 1460 in England.

ii. Sir John Bouchier, born ~? in England.
John married Katherine Howard, sister of Thomas, his step-father.
6/1520, John attended the famous “Field of Cloth of Gold” in France.
John Bouchier knight, lorde Berner, first “Translated lute of Frenche into oure maternall Englysshe tongue” the interesting Chronicl of Syr John Froyssart. (S) A Dictionary of Printers and Printing, Timperely, 1839, P298.

Children of Thomas and Elizabeth:

i. Thomas Howard, born 1473 in England.
2/4/1495, Thomas married Lady Anne, 3rd daughter of King Edward IV.
2/1/1514, Thomas created 2nd Earl of Surrey.
1512-13, Anne died of consumption.
1513, Thomas married Elizabeth, d/o Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham & Elinor Percy.
5/21/1524, Thomas became 3rd Duke of Norfolk on his father’s death.
8/25/1554, Thomas died at Kenninghall, Norfolk.

ii. Elizabeth Howard, born ? in England.
Elizabeth married Sir Thomas Boleyn.
Children:
Anne Boleyn.
Anne 2nd wife of King Henry VIII.
Anne mother of Queen Elizabeth I.

iii. Muriel Howard (46173), born 1486 in England.

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