Tuesday, November 30, 2010

G19: 475278

475278. Sir Nicholas Latimer & 475279. Joan Hody

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~1425, John born in Duntish, Dorset, England, s/o 950556. John Latimer & 950557. Margaret Pipard.

~1435, Joan born in England, d/o 950558. Sir John Hody.

Nicholas sheriff of Dorset and Somerset.

12/30/1460, Nicholas fought for Henry IV at the battle of Wakefield where Yorkists the earl of Salisbury was captured, and the Duke of York, and earl of Rutland were killed.

3/29/1461, Nicholas fought as a Lancastrian at the battle of Towton. In 10 hours thousands fell to the sword, lance, and spear. In the aftermath, the bridge over the river collapsed killing many from both sides. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil with as many as 30,000 Lancastrian’s killed.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned King of England.

Nicholas attained.

1463, Nicholas pardoned.

1466, Nicholas granted some of his former lands, and entered the service of the Duke of Clarence [Yorkist, brother of Edward IV.]

6/3/1468, Nicholas’ act of reversal finally recovered Loxton; but Sir Edward Grey [later Viscount Lisle] apparently refused to deliver the property.

6/19/1468, The Duke of Clarence ruled in Nicholas’ favor; while Nicholas had to pay Grey £100 yearly for 7 years.

6/20/1468, Debtor: Nicholas Latimer, knight [of Newton in Sturminster Newton and Buckland Newton Hundreds, Dorset, and held manor of Alton in Sherborne Hundred. Creditor: Edward Grey, Knight. Amount: £100. (S) UKNA.

1470, Nicholas joined the Duke of Clarence in his revolt; again attained.

10/13/1470, Henry VI restored to the throne.

4/11/1471, Edward IV restored to the throne, partly due to Duke Clarence’s return of support.

5/6/1471, Nicholas, a Yorkist, made knight-banneret after the battle of Tewkesbury. The battle was at the confluence of the Avon and Severn rivers. The Lancanstrians arrived 1st after a 40 mile march and established a strong defensive position. Seeing an opening, Somerset attacked Edward IV at the Yorkist center. He was flanked, and Edward, s/o Henry VI, age 18, was killed in the assault. [The only heir-apparent of England to die in battle.]

1472-75, Nicholas a Knight of the Shire for Dorset.

1475, Nicholas served with the Duke of Clarence in France.

2/18/1478, Duke Clarence executed for treason [sentenced pronounced by the Duke of Buckingham.]

1483, Nicholas, Chamberlain of the Duke of Buckingham. (S) Richard III, Horrox, 1991, P162.

7/6/1483, Richard III crowned King of England. Sir Nicholas Latimer was one of the many earls, lords, and knights in the King’s procession through London. (S) Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland, V3, 1808, P398.

By 10/1483, The Duke of Buckingham in a conspiracy with Henry Tudor [later Henry VII] against Richard III. A £1000 reward was put on the Duke’s head.

11/2/1483, The Duke was executed for treason; Nicholas was also named in the associated attainder with treason.

Nicholas pardoned [although he apparently then joined the forces of Henry Tudor.]

8/22/1485, Nicholas fought at the battle of Bosworth as a Lancastrian, ending the 30-year War of the Roses. King Richard III was killed.

10/30/1485, Henry VII crowned King of England. King Henry VII reversed Nicholas’ last attainder, and installed him on the Dorset bench, where he served until his death.

1497, Nicholas joined the southwest insurrection; pardoned after a fine of 400 marks.

2/8/1504, Nicholas wrote his will.

Bef. 4/17/1505, Nicholas of Duntish, co. Dorset, died; the last male of this line, in possession of Zeals Ailesbury manor.

(S) A Gen. and Heraldic Hist. of the Commoners of Great Britain, Burke, 1835, P681. (S) Fasciculus Mervinensis, … Drake, P9. (S) Richard III and His Rivals, Hicks, 1991, P143. (S) Richard III, Ross, 1984, P109.

Child of Nicholas and Joan:

i. Edith Latimer (237639), born ~1455 in England. [Heir]

Sunday, November 28, 2010

G18: 184678

184678. Duke Edmund Beaufort & 184679. Lady Eleanor Beauchamp

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1406, Edmund born in England, s/o 369356. John Beaufort & 369357. Margaret de Holland.

9/1408, Eleanor born in Walthamstow, Essex, England, co-heir & d/o 369358. Richard Beauchamp & 369359. Elizabeth Berkeley.

Eleanor 1st married Thomas Roos, 8th Lord Roos of Helmesley.

1422, Eleanor coheir to her mother, inheriting 1/3 of the baronies of Berkeley, Lisle, and Tyeys.

1426-27, Edmund’s affair with King Henry V’s widow, Katherine of France, created a political scandal.

1427, Edmund granted the county of Mortain in Normandy.

8/18/1430, Thomas Roos died.

1431, Edmund present at Henry VI’s coronation banquet in Paris, France.

1431-53, Edmund held military commands in the French wars.

1436, Edmund invested as a Knight of the Garter

1433, Edmund Ambassador to the King of Scotland.

Bef. 10/31/1434, Edmund married Eleanor.

8/1441, Edmund made Earl of Dorset for his service in the relief of Calais.

6/24/1443, Edmund, created 4th Earl of Somerset, 1st Marquess of Dorset.

5/27/1444, Edmund succeeded his brother as Earl of Somerset.

1444-1452, Edmund summoned to parliament.

1445, Edmund & Eleanor received a papal dispensation to remain married. [3rd degree].

3/1445, Future Queen Margaret sold silver plate to Eleanor in order to pay her sailors that would take her to England.[Eleanor was likely in the large group sent to retrieve Margaret from France. Eleanor and Margaret became very close friends.]

12/1446, The Queen, earl Edmund, Edmund’s uncle the Cardinal, and others counciled King Henry VI against his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester.

1447, Edmund appointed Governor-General of France and of the Duchies of Normandy and Guienne. Edmund took residence at Rouen with a salary of £20,000 a year. This was during a 2-year truce with France.

3/31/1448, Edmund created 1st Duke Somerset.

1449, Eleanor co-heiress to her niece Anne Beauchamp, Countess of Warwick.

7/1449, Charles VII formally declared war on England. [In a little over a month the English would lose 30 towns.]

10/1449, pressed by the French, Edmund gave up Rouen, 6 other strongholds, and a large sum of money “for the deliverance of his person, wife, children, and goods.”

6/24/1450, Edmund surrendered Caen to King Charles of France.

8/1/1450, Edmund returned to London with “many poor soldiers.” The Duke of York accused Edmund of treason.

12/1/1450, Edmund impeached by a York-controlled parliament and taken prisoner to the Tower. Edmund was released the same day by the Queen. [During the day Edmund’s home had been ransacked.]

1451, King Henry appointed Edmund as Captain of Calais. [Calais and Aquitaine were all that remained of English possessions in France.]

8/3/1451, The duchy of Acquitaine fell to the French.

Edmund returned to England.

3/3/1452 at Dartford, in order to avoid a battle against the Duke of York, King Henry ordered the arrest of Edmund. The Queen defended Edmund and he was not arrested. [Had the battle been fought, it would have been the 1st battle of the War of the Roses.]

1452, Edmund granted the Lordship of the Isle of Wight for life.

5/20/1452, Edmund, duke of Somerset, granted a fair at Woking, Surrey. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516.

10/1452, An English army under John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, took control of a large part of Aquitaine.

10/1453, Edmund was the sponsor for King Henry’s son’s baptism [the King was ill, and the Queen had not completed her time of “churching”.]

10/19/1453, after the death of John Talbot, Charles VII retook Bordeaux, ending the 100 Years War. Only Calais remained a possession of England.

11/18/1453, Eleanor de Beauchamp,

3/27/1454, The King was ill, the Duke of York was named Regent, and Edmund was deposed and committed to the Tower.

12/25/1454, King Henry recovered from a semi-comatose state after 16 months. [There is evidence that he never completely recovered.]

2/16/1455, Edmund released from imprisonment.

1455, Richard of York [white rose]formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham [commander], with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces. [The King’s request for support had been sent out too late. Many arrived after the battle.] The Yorkists also had advantages in cannon and archers.

5/22/1455, Edmund slain at the 1st Battle of St. Albans fighting against Richard, Duke of York; buried within the Lady chapel of St. Albans. [His son Henry was wounded.] The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford, and many other nobles. This was the opening battle of a 30-year, Lancaster-York, “War of the Roses”.

3/4/1457, Eleanor named administrator of Edmund’s estates.

Eleanor remarried to Walter Rokesley, Esq.

1463, Eleanor’s son Henry declared support for King Henry VI against King Edward IV; and Eleanor was imprisoned.

3/12/1467, Eleanor died at Baynard’s Castle, London.

(S) The Royal Lineage of Our Noble and Gentle Families, 1883, Foster, P21. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P756. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Edmund and Eleanor:

i. Eleanor Beaufort (92339), born ~1436 in England. [Eldest]

ii. Henry Beaufort, born ? in England.
5/15/1464, Henry was captured and killed at the battle of Hexham. [Never married, 1 natural son by Joan de la Montaign – Charles, ancestor of the “Somerset” families.]

iii. Joan Beaufort, born ? in England.
Joan married King James 1st of Scotland.
Joan married 2nd James Stewart, the Black Knight of Lorn.

iii. Margaret Beaufort born ? in England.
Margaret married Earl Humphrey Stafford.

iv. Edmund Beaufort, born ~1439 in England.
5/6/1471, Edmund, 4th Duke of Somerset, as a Lancanstrian, was taken prisoner at the Battle of Tewkesbury and beheaded 2 days later. The battle was at the confluence of the Avon and Severn rivers. The Lancanstrians arrived 1st after a 40 mile march and established a strong defensive position. Seeing an opening, Somerset attacked Edward IV at the Yorkist center. He was flanked, and Edward, Prince of Wales, age 18, was killed in the assault. [The only heir-apparent of England to die in battle.]

v. Anne Beaufort (92323), born 3/24/1443 at Baynard castle in London, England.

G21: 1901322

1901322. Lord John Clifford & 1901323. Elizabeth Percy

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1389, John born in England, heir & s/o 3802644. Thomas de Clifford & 3802645. Elizabeth de Roos.

1392, John age 3.

~1395, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 3802646. Sir Henry Percy & 3802647. Elizabeth de Mortimer.

8/1403-11/1412, John married Elizabeth.

Aft. 9/21/1411, John’s sister Matilda became the 2nd wife of Richard of Conisburg, 3rd earl of Cambridge, and stepmother to Richard, future 3rd Duke of York [father of King Edward IV.] (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P60.

1412, John and Elizabeth received a papal indult for a portable altar.

9/21/1412, John 1st summoned to parliament as 7th lord of Skipton.

4/9/1413, John attended the coronation of King Henry V.

10/25/1415, John at the battle of Agincourt [and the following siege of Harfleur] in the retinue of the Earl of Marche as a lance with 3 footmen. (S) History of the Battle of Agincourt, Nicolas, 1827, P88.

1416-7, “Parties to Indenture: Indentures between the king and the following for war-service, (actually for the relief of Harfleur). John Clifford.” (S) UKNA.

John the commander that received the surrender of Cherbourg.

1421, John made Knight of the Garter.

8/31/1422, King Henry V died leaving an infant son Henry VI.

3/3/1423, John replaced by John Cassons in the office of verger of “la Garter” to “carry the rod in the king’s presence on days of festival.” (S) Calendar of Patent Rolls.

John, Knight of the Garter, 7th Lord Clifford, wounded in the great tournament of Carlisle between 6 English knight and 6 French knights.

3/13/1421, John slain at the siege of Meaux, France.

5/7/1426, Elizabeth married Sir Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.

10/26/1436, Elizabeth died; buried at Staindrop, Durham.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P218.

Children of John and Elizabeth: [2 sons, 2 daughters]

i. Thomas Clifford, born by 1415 in England.
Thomas, 8th Lord Skipton, married Joan de Dacre, d/o Thomas Dacre & Philippe Neville.
5/22/1455, Thomas died at the 1st Battle of St. Albans fighting as a Lancastrian against the Duke of York.
Children
Baron John Clifford, 9th Lord of Skipton born 1435, nicknamed “the Butcher” for killing Edmund, age 17 and 2nd s/o the Duke of York following the battle of Wakefield.

ii. Mary Clifford (950661), born bef. 1422 in England.

G21: 1901430 Neville-Montagu

1901430. Earl Richard Neville & 1901431. Alice de Montagu

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1400, Richard born in England, s/o 7605706. Ralph Neville & 3802861. Joan Beaufort.

1406, Alice born in England, heir & d/o 3802862. Earl Thomas Montague & 3802863. Eleanor Holand.

Bef. 2/1420 at Orleans, France, Richard married Alice.

2/1421, Richard a carver at the coronation feast of Queen Catherine, wife of King Henry V.

1424, Richard involved in the liberation of King James I of Scotland from England.

1/1425, Richard appointed Constable of the royal castle of Pontefract.

10/21/1425, Richard’s father, Earl of Westmoreland, died. Richard, a younger son by his father’s 2nd marriage, was not the heir.

1426-7, “Thomas Womewill, esquire to Sir Richard Nevill, knight, Warden of the West March: Indenture of military service: Yorks.” (S) UKNA.

1428, Alice age 22 heir to her father’s lands and titles.

5/3/1429, Richard created 5th Earl of Salisbury in right of his wife.

11/6/1429, Richard the Deputy Constable at the coronation of King Henry VI. [The Duke of Bedford was not present.]

6/1431-2/1432, Richard with the King on a trip to Paris.

2/1435, Richard resigned the Wardenship of the East March and the Captaincy of Berwick.

4/22/1435, “This indenture made betwixt Richard [Neville] Erle of Salisbury.. and Thomas Dacre, Knygth, son and heire to ye lorde Dacre …” (S) UKNA. [Thomas is Richard’s nephew.]

12/9/1435, Richard and his brother William attened parliament at Westminster. (S) CPRs, 3/11/1436.

3/10/1436, “… to Richard Nevill, earl of Salisbury and Alice his wife and her issue, …” (S) UKNA.

3/11/1436, In the parliament … the king desired Richard, earl of Salisbury, and William, lord of Fauconberge, ‘chivaler’ to cross into France and serve him there, which agreed to do to certain conditions, and particularly to the consent of their mother Joan, countess of Westmoreland, … unlawful entries … likely to be done in their absence by Ralph, earl of Westmorland, John and Thomas his brothers, … 4000£ … bond … (S) CPRs.

5/1436-11/1437, Richard with Richard, Duke of York [his brother-in-law] in France.

11/1437, Richard, named to the Privy Council, took up residence in London at ‘The Harbour’ in Dowgate. [The main home of the Nevill’s, Bisham Manor, was a days ride from London.]

1438, Richard Richard appointed as a Knight of the Garter

11/1440, Richard, on the death of his mother, took possession of his father’s lands in Yorkshire.

5/4/1442, King Henry VI confirmed Richard’s title of Earl for the dignity of his life.

11/7/1444, Richard and other members of a royal embassy left for France to escort [Queen by proxy wedding] Margaret back to England.

1446, Alice an executor of the will of her kinswoman Maud Clifford, widow of Richard, Earl of Cambridge.

1447, Richard assisted in the arrest of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, at Bury St. Edmonds.

9/1449, Richard retained the services of Sir Walter Strickland and 290 men for the term of his life against all folk, saving allegiance to the King.

2/1452, Earl Richard and many other magnates assembled with Henry VI at Northampton to council the King on how to handle the Duke of York who was leading a force towards London.

1453, Warwick, Richard’s son, had his lordship of Glamorgan, Wales taken away by the king and given to the Duke of Somerset. This caused the Neville clan to side with the Yorks against the Lancasters. [As with most families, there were some members on both sides. York’s claim to the throne was actually stronger than that of the King.]

8/1453, Younger members of Richard’s family and of the Percy family, the two most powerful families of the north, happened upon each other and a war broke out between the clans.

1454, In support of the Duke of York as protector of the Realm while King Henry was “seized with madness”, Richard brought “seven score knights and squires besides other many” to London.

4/1/1454, the Duke of York gave Richard the Great Seal.

4/10/1454, The Duke of York, as Protector, named Richard as Chancellor of England.

1454, “Petitioners: Mayor of Calais; … [Richard Nevill], Chancellor of England.” (S) UKNA.

By 3/1455, King Henry had recovered and Richard was removed as Chancellor. The king pardoned all who had benefited from the Duke of Somerset’s imprisonment [which included Richard.] Richard returned to his castle at Middleham.

1455, Richard [Plantagenet], Duke of York [white rose] formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham [commander], with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces. [The King’s request for support had been sent out too late. Many arrived after the battle.] The Yorkists also had advantages in cannon and archers.

5/20/1455, The forces of York arrived at Royston, Hertfordshire, where they released a letter stating that they meant no harm to the King, and had raised an army and moved south in self defense against the Duke of Somerset.

5/22/1455, Richard fought at the 1st battle of St. Albans [with his son Richard]. York and Salisbury attacked from the East with little success. Warwick led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear by breaking into the town from the side. The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford [commander of the vanguard], and many other nobles. King Henry, wounded, submitted to Yorkist control. Queen Margaret and 2-year-old son Edward went into exile. This was the opening battle of a 30-year, Lancaster-York, War of the Roses. [Abbot Whethamstead of St. Albans gave and eyewitness account of the events.]

7/9/1455, At parliament called by the Duke of York, again Protector, the York-aligned magnates renewed their oaths of allegiance to the king.

2/1456, Henry VI revoked the Duke of York’s appointment as Protector.

8/1456, Richard returned to Middleham castle.

2/1458, York [Lieutenant of Ireland], Richard [Salisbury] and Warwick [Captain of Calais] were commanded by King Henry to endow a chantry for the souls of those killed at the battle of St. Albans as well as compensate financially the families of Clifford, Northumberland, and Somerset.

3/24/1458, “Loveday”, the King and Queen and Yorkist leaders walked hand-in-hand through the streets of London.

11/1458, Richard’s son met with him at Middleham before returning to Calais to inform him of the Queen’s attempt on his position as Captain of Calais and on his life.

11/23/1458, soon after All-Saints day, Richard at castle Middleham met other powerful men. They agreed to support the Duke of York’s claim to the throne. (S) Journal of the Architectural, … Historical Society, 1857, P83.

5/10/1459, Richard wrote his will.

9/23/1459, Richard [Salisbury] fought the battle of Blore Heath in western England [Shropshire], where his opponent Lord Audley [James Touchet] was slain and two of his sons captured. Richard faced a superior force in numbers, but one which did not have the experience of his forces. Richard strategically pinned Audley’s forces on a steep brook embackment and decimated them with arrows, causing many others to flee. 2000-3000 were slain in a prolonged battle, mostly on Audley’s side.

Richard then evaded other royal forces of the Queen, went to maket Drayton [where he learned that his sons Thomas and John had been captured at Acton Bridge], and then and met up with York at Ludlow. Warwick arrived soon afterwards.

The Yorkists, 25,000 strong, made an advance on Worcestor. They encountered a superior royalist force and withdrew to Ludford bridge near Ludlow. King Henry sent an offer of pardon to York at Ludford, which did not include pardons for Richard and his associates.

10/10/1459, The royal forces appeared opposite the forces of York.

10/12/1459, During the night, Andrew Trollope, the Yorkist vanguard commander and his forces deserted. Salisbury made his way, with Warwick and the Earl of March [s/o the Duke of York and future Edward IV], to Devon, then by sea, to Guernsey [a channel island] and Calais, where Warwick was still Captain. The Duke of York made his way to Ireland with is son Rutland.

11/20/1459, Richard and his sons attained.

1/28/1460, Lord Rivers, his wife the Duchess of Bedford, and their son Anthony Wydville were brought before Salisbury, his son Wawick, and March in Calais; having been captured in Sandwich.

6/1460, Warwick and Salisbury sent forces to capture Sandwich and establish a beachhead for an invasion.

6/26/1460, Richard recrossed the Channel back to England with Warwick and March, and landed at Sandwich with 2000 men. From there they went to Canterbury.

7/2/1460, The Salisbury-Warwick-March army reached London with a force of 40,000, of which 500 were mounted.

7/5/1460, Lord Fauconberg, brother of Salisbury, left London heading north with 10,000 men. Soon after Warwick and March followed, leaving Salisbury in London with 2000 men.

9/8/1460, The Duke of York returned from Ireland.

10/10/1460, During parliament, York rode into London at the head of a large retinue. York decared himself king. Ultimately, York was named successor to Henry. [The Yorkist attainders were also erased.] Warwick and Salisbury did not support York’s claim to the throne. The Queen quickly raised an army in response to her son being disinherited.

11/1460, The Queen’s army of 20,000 marched south through York ravishing the countryside.

12/9/1460, York and Salisbury rode north out of London at the head of 6000 men heading for Sandal castle near Wakefield, arriving on the 21st. There they would wait for March and reinforcements from Shrewsbury.

12/29/1460, The Lancastrians infiltrated 400 men into the ranks of the Yorkists.

12/30/1460, Richard, captured at the battle of Wakefield, his son Thomas killed. The Duke of York was killed, as well as his son Edmund, Earl of Rutland. About 1000 were slain, evenly split between the sides.

Richard , 5th Earl of Salisbury, was taken to Prontefract castle where he was killed by commoners while escaping.

1462, Alice died; buried with Richard at Bisham Priory, Berkshire.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P579. (S) Dictionary of Battles, Eggenberger, 1967. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Richard and Alice: [6 sons, 6 daughters]

i. Cecily Neville, born 1424 in England. [Eldest daughter.]
1434, Cecily married Henry de Beauhamp, s/o 369358. Earl Richard Beauchamp & 369359. Elizabeth Berkeley.

7/28/1450, Cecily died.

ii. Earl Richard Neville (1901430i), born 11/22/1428 in England.

iii. Alice Neville (950715), born ~1430 in England.

G21: 1901430ii

1901430ii. Earl Richard Neville, “the Kingmaker”

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11/22/1428, Richard born in England, s/o 1901430. Earl Richard Neville & 1901431. Alice de Montagu.

1434, Richard bethrothed to Anne Beauchamp, d/o 369358. Richard Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick & [2nd wife] Isabel le Despenser.

6/11/1446, Richard’s brother-in-law, Henry, 1st Duke of Warwick, died, leaving as his heir his 2-year-old daughter Anne. [Henry married to Richard’s sister Cecily, Richard married to Henry’s sister Anne.]

5/22/1455, Richard fought with his father at the 1st battle of St. Albans. Richard led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear.

1/3/1449, Richard’s neice Anne, a minor, heir to the Duke of Warwick, died.

Anne, Richard’s wife, named as heir to her brother Henry. [Her 3 half-sisters protested to no avail, Anne was the rightful heir due to her being the only full sibiling.] Richard now owned land in 18 counties and over 20 castles; with his seat at Warwick castle, a massive fortress. The greatest concentration of his lands were in the western midlands and south Wales. An import lordship was that of Glamorgan, Wales.

1449, Richard made 16th Earl of Warwick and named the Constable of Calais.

1453, A dispute began between Earl Richard and the Duke of Somerset over ownership of Glamorgan in Wales, which the king had just granted to Somerset. This caused the Neville clan to side with the Yorks against the Lancasters. [As with most families, there were some members on both sides.]

8/1453, Members of Richard’s family and of the Percy family, the two most powerful families of the north, happened upon each other and a war broke out between the clans.

1454, The Duke of York named protector of the Realm while King Henry was “seized with madness”.

By 3/1455, King Henry had recovered and Salisbury [Richard’s father] was removed as Chancellor.

1455, Richard of York [white rose] formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces.

5/20/1455, The forces of York arrived at Royston, Hertfordshire, where they released a letter stating that they meant no harm to the King, and had raised an army and moved south in self defense against the Duke of Somerset.

5/22/1455, Richard fought at the 1st battle of St. Albans [with his father Richard], and became very powerful after the victory. The Yorkists initiated an assault. Richard led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear. The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford, and many other nobles. This was the opening battle of the 30-year, Lancaster-York, War of the Roses. King Henry submitted to Yorkist control.

4/20/1456, King Henry appointed Richard the Captain of Calais, the highest military appointment due to its strategic location.

8/1456, After helping suppress a Scottish invasion, Richard went to Calais.

1457, Richard used his 10-ship fleet to suppress piracy in the channel and to defeat a Spanish fleet. [During this time Richard also built a “lavish” home in London where he was gaining popularity.]

2/1458, York [Lieutenant of Ireland], Richard [Salisbury] and Warwick [Captain of Calais] were commanded by King Henry to endow a chantry for the souls of those killed at the battle of St. Albans. Warwick also paid the Clifford family 1000 marks.

3/24/1458, “Loveday”, the King and Queen and Yorkist leaders walked hand-in-hand through the streets of London.

1458, Richard began negotiations with Philip, Duke of Burgundy.

Warwick was called to London by the Queen to respond to accusations of piracy against the Germans. Richard arrived with 600 armed soldiers.

7/31/1458, A formal inquiry into Richard’s actions was started by the Council. [The next day Londoners rioted against the Queen, and in support of Richard.]

Fall/1458, Richard was in London when a possible attempt on his life was made [it may have been an accident.] Richard was accused by the Queen of starting the incident and ordered his arrest. Richard escaped back to Calais.

11/1458, The Queen attempted to revoke Richard’s appointment at Calais. Richard returned to London and defended his appointment on the grounds that only the Parliament could revoke his assignment. On leaving the council, Richard was attacked by men of Somerset and Wiltshire, but again escaped.

9/21/1459, Warwick, with 200 men-at-arms and 400 archers – mostly professional soldiers, entered London in support of his father and the Duke of York. From there, with a larger army, Richard headed for Warwick castle to rendezvous with his father. The Queen’s forces were already at Warwick castle, and Richard turned to head for Ludlow and meet up with York.

9/1459, Warwick met his father and York at Ludlow castle.

The Yorkists, 25,000 strong, made an advance on Worcestor. They encountered a superior royalist force and withdrew to Ludford bridge near Ludlow. King Henry sent an offer of pardon to York at Ludford, which did not include pardons for Salisbury and his associates.

10/10/1459, The royal forces appeared opposite the forces of York.

10/12/1459, During the night, Andrew Trollope, the Yorkist vanguard commander and his forces deserted. Salisbury made his way, with Warwick and the Earl of March [s/o the Duke of York and future Edward IV], to Devon, then by sea, to Guernsey [a channel island] and Calais, where Richard was still Captain. The Duke of York made his way to Ireland.

11/20/1459, Warwick and his father attained.

In response to an attack by the Duke of Somerset, Richard attacked Sandwich. Then Somerset, with 1000 men under Trollope attacked and captured Guisnes castle. Richard, in return, captured Somerset’s commanders Lord Audley and Humphrey Stafford.

1/28/1460, Lord Rivers, his wife the Duchess of Bedford, and their son Anthony Wydville were brought before Salisbury, his son Wawick, and March in Calais; having been captured in Sandwich.

3/1460, Richard traveled to Waterford, Ireland to meet with the Duke of York where they planned a two-pronged invasion.

6/1/1460, Richard arrived back in Calais by sea.

6/1460, Warwick and Salisbury sent forces to capture Sandwich and establish a beachhead for an invasion.

6/26/1460, Warwick recrossed the Channel back to England with his father and Marche, and landed at Sandwich with 2000 men. From there they went to Canterbury.

7/2/1460, The Salisbury-Warwick-March army reached London with a force of 40,000, of which 500 were mounted.

7/5/1460, Lord Fauconberg, brother of Salisbury, left London heading north with 10,000 men. Soon after Warwick and March followed, leaving Salisbury in London with 2000 men.

7/10/1460, Richard attacked the royalist forces at Northhampton. Lord Grey of Ruthin [later Earl of Kent], commanding a Lancastrian force, turned sides and helped the Yorkists. The Duke of Buckingham and many Lancastrian nobles died. King Henry was taken to London under Yorkist control. The Queen fled Coventry for Scotland.

10/28/1460, Henry named as his successor Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, who had returned from exile in Ireland. [The Yorkist attainders were also erased.]

12/9/1460, Warwick remained in charge in London while his father and York left northward to meet the advancing army of the Queen.

12/30/1460, Richard’s father captured [and later killed] at the battle of Wakefield. [The Duke of York was also killed.] Richard became 6th Earl of Salisbury, and the richest magnate in the history of England, owning twice what any other had possessed. March became the 4th Duke of York.

2/2/1461, March defeated Lancastrian forces at the battle of Mortimore’s Cross. Owen Tudor, Henry VI’s stepfather, was captured and executed.

2/17/1461, The forces of Queen Margaret made a surprise attack on Richard’s forces at the 2nd battle of St. Albans. In a snow storm, half the Yorkist forces were killed. Richard, and John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, escaped. King Henry VI was left sitting under a tree for the Lancastrian forces.

2/27/1461, Edward of York, s/o the slain Duke, joined with Richard’s remaining forces of about 4000, returned to London.

3/14/1461, Edward [earl of March] proclaimed himself King Edward IV as the rightful heir.

3/28/1461, Richard defeated by a Lancastrian army commanded by Lord Clifford at the battle of Ferrybridge. Richard was wounded in the leg. Afterwards, Warwick killed his horse in full view of his soldiers, saying he would rather die on foot with his men than give another inch. With Edward’s support the tide turned and Lord Clifford was killed [Clifford had murdered Edward’s younger brother.]

3/29/1461, March and Warwick’s forces, with a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage, began the battle of Towton, Yorkshire. In 10 hours thousands fell to the sword, lance, and spear. Both March and Warwick were involved in hand-to-hand combat. About dusk, Yorkist reinforcements, fresh to battle, arrived, sent by the earl of Norfolk. The arrival sent the tired Lancaster forces fleeing. In the aftermath, the bridge over the river collapsed killing many from both sides. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil. As many as 28,000 died at the battle, 8000 Yorkists. [Another estimated 12,000 Lancastrians died in the aftermath of the main battle.]

King Henry, Queen Margaret, and Prince Edward fled to Scotland.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

7/1461, Richard suppressed a Lancastrian incursion in Northumberland, capturing the castles of Alnwick and Bamburgh.

5/1462, Warwick seized a castle in Scotland. [Queen Margaret were now in France.]

10/1462, Queen Margaret landed at Bamburgh with a small invasion force, retaking its castle as well as Alnwick. The Queen then traveled north to Berwick to meet up with King Henry and the Lancastrian supporters.

11/1462, The Lancastrians in retreat, Warwick captured Warkworth castle to use as a base or operations in the north.

By 1/6/1463, Richard had captured Alnwick and Dunstanburgh. [These were soon back in Lancastrian hands due to their governors switching sides.]

7/1463, Queen Margaret returned to France to seek support from the Duke of Burgundy.

6/23/1464, Warwick again appeared before Alnwick castle demanding its surrender. Warwick proceeded to take Dunstanburgh and Norham.

9/4/1464 at Reading, with Warwick putting pressure on Edward IV to conclude a marriage alliance with France, Edward announced that he was already secretly married to Elizabeth Wydville – a marriage disliked by most nobility.

Warwick wrote a letter to King Louis XI telling him that he and the King were not on good terms.

7/13/1465, King Henry VI was captured. He was then taken to Islington to Warwick, who took him to the Tower.

1/1466, Warwick was in disagreement with Edward IV over foreign alliances. Warwick wanted an alliance with France, Edward with Burgundy.

4/14/1466, Richard sent to Burgundy to investigate a potential marriage of King Edward’s sister Margaret. While in France, Warwick met with King Louis XI at Calais and signed a 2-year truce.

1466, Edward IV replaced Warwick’s uncle as Treasure of England with his stepfather, Earl Rivers.

1467, Warwick proposed his daughters as brides of Edward IV,s brothers. [King Edward refused.]

1469, Warwick and King Louis XI had a secret agreement that Warwick would be given Holland and Zeeland if he could overthrow Edward IV.

1469, Warwick and his family returned to Calais.

6/28/1469, Warwick, back in England, raised an army to march against northern rebels.

7/4/1469, Warwick, with a papal approval for his daughter to marry Clarence, brother of the King, returned to Calais.

7/16/1469, Warwick returned to England, going 1st to Canterbury.

7/26/1469, Warwick’s forces, meeting up with those of Sir John Conyers, defeated the forces of Pembroke at the battle of Edgecote. The earl of Pembroke was captured and executed. The earl of Devon fled but was later captured and executed. Soon after, King Edward was captured at Olney.

8/12/1469, Warwick executed captured Sir John Wydville and Earl Rivers [brother and father of the Queen.]

10/1469, Warwick released Edward IV from captivity.

3/8/1470, Both Warwick and Clarence were given commissions of array to raise armies to suppress a revolt [which they had secretly instigated.]

3/12/1470, King Edward defeated Sir Robert Welles at the battle of Empingham and captured documents showing Warwick and Clarence were behind the uprising.

3/25/1470, Edward removed Warwick’s brother as earl of Northumberland; offering a Marquess title [with no land] and the marriage of his eldest daughter to John’s son [George Neville] in replacement.

4/3/1470, Warwick and Clarence put to sea from Exeter [having had most of their ships captured at Southampton.]

5/1/1470, Warwick landed at Honfleur and was greeted by the royal Admiral of King Louis XI.

6/8/1470, King Louis began negotiations between Warwick and Queen Margaret at Amboise on the Loire. Louis would support Warwick if they restored Henry VI and pledged support of England against Burgundy.

7/15/1470, at Angers, France, Warwick met with Queen Margaret, offered apologies, and was pardoned. It was agreed that Prince Henry would marry Warwick’s daughter Anne.

9/9/1470, Warwick with a fleet of 60 ships sailed from La Hogue, Normandy for England. [A storm had scattered the Burgundian fleet guarding the coast of France, and the English fleet guarding the channel.]

9/13/1470 Warwick’s invasion force landed at Plmounth on the west part of the southern coast. [Soon afterwards Warwick’s brother, John, Marquess of Montague, changed sides back in support of Warwick.] King Edward IV, realizing his position, headed for Norfolk, from which he sailed for Holland [Burgundian territory.]

10/6/1470, Warwick’s forces entered London unopposed [and by messenger had already released Henry VI from prison.]

10/13/1470, Henry VI restored to the throne, Warwick carrying the king’s train in the procession.

3/14/1471, Edward IV landed his forces at Ravenspur, where he burned his ship to indicate he did not plan to retreat.

3/23/1471, Warwick forced Clarence to deliver some of his property to Queen Margaret and Prince Edward.

3/29/1471, Edward IV and his army arrived at Coventry where Warwick had his forces.

4/3/1471, Some of Edward’s forces intercepted the earl of Oxford at Leicester and defeated him. Clarence decided to return support to his brother Edward IV, and arrived at Coventry with 12,000 men. Not able to lure Warwick out of Coventry, Edward decided to take London. [Warwick followed 2 days later.]

4/11/1471, Edward IV entered London and took King Henry prisoner.

4/13/1471, Edward moved north out of London. His advanced forces skirmished with Warwick’s advanced forces at Barnet, 10 miles north of London. Arriving at night, the two main forces unknowingly camped next to each other.

4/14/1471, Richard, Earl of Warwick, “the King maker”, age 42, now head of the Lancastrian army, killed at the battle of Barnet against royalist forces of Edward IV. A heavy fog limited visibility. A combined total of 1000 knights died. Both handguns [relatively new] and cannon were used during the fight.

Richard buried at Bisham, Berkshire.

(S) Warwick the King-maker, Philippe de Comines, 2005. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Richard and Anne:

i. Isabel, born 9/5/1451 at Warwick castle, England.
7/11/1469 in Calais, Isabel married George, Duke of Clarence, brother of King Edward IV.
12/22/1476, Isabel died.

ii. Queen Anne, born 6/11/1456 at Warwick castle, England.
7/25/1470, Anne betrothed to Prince Edward, s/o King Henry VI, in Angers Cathedral, France. [Both great-grandchildren of John of Gaunt – a dispensation would be required to consummate the marriage.]
12/13/1470 in France, Edward and Anne married by the Grand Vicar of Bayeux.
5/4/1471, Edward killed at the battle of Tewkesbury.
7/12/1472, Anne married 2nd, Richard [later King Richard III], Duke of Gloucester, brother of King Edward IV.
3/1485, Anne died.

Friday, November 26, 2010

G18: 184692

184692. Duke John Howard & 184693. Katherine de Moleyns

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~1415, John born in England, s/o 369384. Robert Howard & 369385. Margaret Mowbray.

~1420, Katherine born in England, d/o 369386. Sir William Moleyns & 369387. Margery ?.

1440, John married Katherine.

1451, John accompanied Lord L’isle to Guienne, France.

John 1st married Catherine.

7/17/1453, John at the battle of Chatillon,France, in service to John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk. The French imployed a new “rock launcher” and decisively defeated the English, ending the hundred years war. John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, died in the battle.

1455, John elected Knight of the Shire for Norfolk.

3/16/1461, Sir John Howard met up with Edward [IV] at Cambridge, arriving from the abbey of Bury St Edmunds where he had received £100 in support of Edward.

3/29/1461, John, a Yorkist, knighted at the battle of Towton by Edward [IV].

6/28/1461, Edward IV, age 19, crowned King of England.

1461, John appointed Constable of Colchester Castle, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk; and one of the King’s Carvers. John was also appointed to the King’s council, a small select group of advisors.

8/1461, John involved in a brawl with John Paston, and used his influence with Edward IV against Paston.

11/1461, John imprisoned after giving offence at the election of Paston.

1462, John appointed Constable of Norwich Castle and received grants of several manors forfeited by the Earl of Wiltshire. He was joined by William Neville, Baron Fauconberg and Lord Clinton to “keep the seas”, taking Croquet and the Isle of Rhe.

1464, John helped Norfolk secure Wales for Edward IV; bought the reversion of Bamburgh Castle; and was with Edward IV and his court at Reading.

11/3/1465, Catherine died at Stoke Nayland.

1466, John appointed Vice Admiral for Norfolk and Suffolk; and was in Calais part of the year.

Bef. 1/22/1467, John married 2nd Margaret, d/o Sir John Chedworth, widow.

4/1467, John elected Knight of the Shire for Suffolk.

11/1467, John appointed Envoy to France; and Treasurer to the Household [held until 1474.]

6/1468, John attended Margaret of York to Flanders for her marriage to Charles, Duke of Burgundy.

7/26/1469, Edward IV’s army was defeated at the battle of Edgecote Moor by the the earl of Warwick, who had put Edward on the throne, but was in rebellion. Warwick had Edward put under house arrest.

10/1469, John with other magnates who supported Edward IV were secretly summoned to join him at York. From York over 1000 mounted men followed the King to London.

3/1470, John Howard and Lord Rivers took forces to Southampton and captured all the vessels of Warwick in the port including the Trinity.

10/15/1470, John created Baron de Howard.

10/30/1470, King Henry VI restored to the throne by the forces of Warwick. John took refuge at Colchester.

3/1471, John supported Edward IV’s return from exile to become King.

4/1471, John emerged from Colchester to join the forces of Edward IV moving on London.

4/11/1470, John with the forces of King Edward IV entered London where the Archbishop of Cantebury deposed King Henry VI.

4/14/1471, John badly wounded at the battle of Barnet where the earl of Warwick , “the Kingmaker”, was killed.

5/4/1471, Edward IV defeated the forces of Henry VI at the battle of Tewkesbury to regain the throne of England.

6/1471, John appointed Deputy Governor of Calais.

7/1474, John with Edward IV in his invasion of France. After the truce of Amiens, John received a pension from Louis XI and remained in France, briefly, as a hostage. On his return to England, John was granted manors in Suffolk and Oxfordshire forfeited by John de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

1477-79, John sent to France on multiple trips.

11/19/1479, John Howard granted a market and fair at Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516.

1481, John coheir to his cousin Anne Mowbray; heiress & d/o John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.

11/15/1482, John summoned to parliament.

4/1483, John carried the king’s banner at the funeral of Edward IV, pledging allegiance to Richard III.

5/13/1483, John appointed High Steward of the Duchy of Lancaster and a Privy Councillor.

6/28/1483, John created Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshall of England. [Anne Mowbray, only d/o John, Duke of Norfolk, died before consummation of her marriage to the Duke of York. The title went to her closet relative, John Howard.]

7/6/1483, Richard III crowned King of England. John acted as High Steward, bore the crown, and as Earl Marshall was the King’s Champion.

John persuaded Elizabeth Wydville [Woodville] to let the young Duke of York join his brother Edward V in the Tower.

By 9/1483, Edward V and his younger brother were “put to silence in the Tower of London.” (S) Entry by Robert Ricart, Recorder of Bristol. [John was possibly involved in the murder of the two princes.]

9/12/1484 at Nottingham, John appointed Chief of Commissioners to negotiate with James III of Scotland.

8/22/1485, John commanded the vanguard in the battle of Bosworth; killed in the battle; buried in the conventual church at Thetford, Norfolk. In the battle, Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, after invading southwest Wales, raised an army of 5,000. John, in the forces of Richard III, was also allied with the Duke of Norfolk and the Earl of Northumberland and an army of 10,000. Thomas Lord Stanley and his brother William commanded 6,000 reserves. The Stanley’s turned to support Henry. Northumberland did not engage other forces. The Yorkist were overwhelmed. Richard III and the Duke of Norfolk were killed. Richard’s royal crown was placed on Henry’s head. This battle ended the 30-year War of the Roses.

1494, Margaret died; buried at Stoke Nayland.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P438. (S) The History and Antiquities of Boston, Thompson, P373. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of John and Catherine:

i. Thomas Howard (92346), born 1443 in England.

ii. Anne Howard, born ? in England.
Anne married Edmund Georges.

iii. Isabel Howard, born ? in England.
Isabel married Sir Robert Mortimer.

iv. Jane Howard, born ? in England.
Jane married Sir John Timperley.

v. Margaret Howard, born ? in England.
Margaret married Sir John Wyndham.

Children of John and Margaret:

ii. Katherine Howard, born ? in England.
Katherine married Sir John Bouchier, 2nd Lord Bouchier, stepson of her brother Thomas.
Children:
Jane Bouchier, born ? in England.
She married Sir Edmund Knyvet, gs/o her brother Thomas.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

G17: 92346

92346. Duke Thomas Howard & 92347. Elizabeth Tilney & 475358. Sir Humphrey Bourchier

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1443, Thomas born in Stoke Neyland, Suffolk, England, s/o 184692. John Howard & 184693. Catherine de Moleyns.

~1445, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 184694. Sir Frederick Tilney & 184695. Elizabeth Cheney.

2/21/1447, John Say given wardship and marriage of his step-dughter Elizabeth.

~1450, Humphrey born in England, s/o 950716. Lord John Bourchier & 950717. Marjorie Berners.

4/11/1451, “Indenture, marriage settlement. 1) John Bourgchier, kt. 2) John Say esqs. Laurence Cheyne esqs. Humfrey, s. of (1) to espouse Eliz., d. of Frederyk Tylney, esq., "that is to God passed", she being ward of J.S., before next All Saints. … If Humfrey die before Eliz. 14 yrs., she is to marry next son, or in default to be returned unmarried with any property. …” (S) UKNA.

10/1470, Thomas, Treasurer of the household of Edward IV, fled to Colchester when Henry VI was briefly restored to the throne. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P376.

4/14/1471, Humphrey Bourchier, a Yorkist, slain at Barnet Field, buried at Wesminster Abbey. Thomas Howard was “sore hurt” fighting on the Yorkist side for Edward IV. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P398.

1471, Thomas went to France in support of Charles, Duke of Burgundy. [Thomas returned to England in 1472.]

2/28/1472, Elizabeth wrote a will: “I Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Frederick Tilney, …”.

4/1472, Thomas Esquire of the Body of Edward IV.

4/30/1472, Thomas married Elizabeth.

5/8/1472, Elizabeth wrote another will: “Dame Elizabeth Howard, daughter and heir of Frederick Tilney, and now wife of Thomas Howard, son and heir of John, Lord Howard, …”. [There is a 3rd will of 1506 attributed to her, but this was actually the will of Elizabeth Talbot, widow of Duke of Norfolk.]

6/1475, Thomas led 6 men-at-arms and 200 archers to join the king's army in France.

1476, Thomas made Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

1/18/1478, Thomas knighted and created by King Edward IV at the marriage of the king’s son, the Duke of York to Lady Anne Mowbray.

4/9/1483, King Edward IV died; succeded by his 12 year old son Edward V.

7/6/1483, Richard III became King of England, deposing Edward V. Thomas carried the Sword of State at the coronation.

By 9/1483, Edward V and his younger brother were “put to silence in the Tower of London.” (S) Entry by Robert Ricart, Recorder of Bristol.

1483, Thomas created Earl of Surrey, invested as a Knight of the Garter, and appointed Lord Steward of the Household.

8/22/1485, Thomas fought [with his father] on the losing side at Bosworth against Henry VII. [His father was killed, he was take prisoner, attained, and taken to the Tower in London.]

10/30/1485, King Henry VII crowned King of England.

6/1487, Thomas refused a chance to escape from the Tower, which was noted by King Henry VII.

1/1488, Thomas released from the Tower when he agreed to command against the Scots. He was restored as Earl of Surrey.

5/1488, Thomas was sent to put down a taxation rebellion in Yorkshire. [They had slain Henry Percy, earl of Northumberland – Thomas had the leader executed.]

1490, Thomas’ Knight of the Garter status restored.

1492, Thomas suppressed a rebellion at Acworth in Wales.

4/4/1497, Elizabeth died.

1497, Thomas invaded Scotland after James IV had laid siege to Norham castle. Thomas challenged the Scot king to battle, but eventually had to retreat due to weather.

6/25/1501, Thomas confirmed as Lord Treasurer and made a member of the Privy Council.

1501, Thomas sent to arrange the marriage terms of Henry VII’s daughter Margaret to James IV of Scotland.

Thomas married 2nd Agnes Tilney, cousin of Elizabeth, gd/o Hugh Tilney of Boston, brother of Elizabeth’s father Frederick.

1503, Thomas escorted Princess Margaret to Edinburgh, Scotland.

10/1508, Thomas sent to Antwerp to negotiate the marriage of Henry VII’s daughter Mary with the Prince of Castile.

3/1509, Thomas on a commission to conclude a treaty with France.

4/1509, Thomas an executor of King Henry VII’s will.

6/24/1509, Henry VIII crowned King of England.

7/1510, Thomas appointed as Earl Marshall.

11/1511, Thomas on a commission of peace to treat with Ferdinand of Aragon.

9/1512, Thomas, at odds with [future Cardinal] Thomas Wosley, left the Court of Henry VIII.

9/9/1513, Henry VIII went to France about his claim to the French throne. While he was gone King James of Scotland invaded with 30,000 men. At the battle of Flodden Field, English longbow versus Scottish spear, Thomas, as Lieutenant General of the North, repulsed the attack with 20,000, killing over 10,000 Scots and the king. [The last great battle won by the longbow.]

2/1/1514, Thomas, 70 years old, reacquired his father’s title of Duke of Norfolk, and restored as Earl Marshall.

11/16/1515, Thomas one of the escorts of Thomas Wosley as he was inducted as a Cardinal at Westminster.

2/1516, Elizabeth was godmother to Princess Mary [future Queen “Bloody Mary”.]

5/1517, Thomas suppressed a riot in London known as “Evil May Day”.

1520-21, Thomas served as Guardian of the Realm while King Henry returned to France.

5/1521, while acting as Lord High Steward, Thomas was compelled to put his friend Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham to death on charges of treason.

5/1522, Thomas sent as an ambassador to Holy Roman Emperor, Carlos V.

4/1523, Thomas attended parliament [but he had resigned as Treasurer.]

5/21/1524, Thomas died at Castle Framlingham, Norfolk.

6/26/1524, Thomas buried at Thetford Priory, Norfolk.

(S) Fifty Ancestors of Henry Lincoln Clapp, 1902, P73. (S) UKNA, East Susses Record Office, DAN. (S) The History of Long Melford, Parker, 1873, P68. (S) Visitation of Norfolk.

Children of Humphrey and Elizabeth:

i. Anne Bouchier (237679), born 1460 in England.

ii. Sir John Bouchier, born ~? in England.
John married Katherine Howard, sister of Thomas, his step-father.
6/1520, John attended the famous “Field of Cloth of Gold” in France.
John Bouchier knight, lorde Berner, first “Translated lute of Frenche into oure maternall Englysshe tongue” the interesting Chronicl of Syr John Froyssart. (S) A Dictionary of Printers and Printing, Timperely, 1839, P298.

Children of Thomas and Elizabeth:

i. Thomas Howard, born 1473 in England.
2/4/1495, Thomas married Lady Anne, 3rd daughter of King Edward IV.
2/1/1514, Thomas created 2nd Earl of Surrey.
1512-13, Anne died of consumption.
1513, Thomas married Elizabeth, d/o Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham & Elinor Percy.
5/21/1524, Thomas became 3rd Duke of Norfolk on his father’s death.
8/25/1554, Thomas died at Kenninghall, Norfolk.

ii. Elizabeth Howard, born ? in England.
Elizabeth married Sir Thomas Boleyn.
Children:
Anne Boleyn.
Anne 2nd wife of King Henry VIII.
Anne mother of Queen Elizabeth I.

iii. Muriel Howard (46173), born 1486 in England.

G20: 950710

950710. Viscount John Beaumont & 950711. Elizabeth Phelip

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8/16/1410, John born in England, heir & s/o 1901420. Henry Beaumont & 1901421. Elizabeth Willoughby.

4/9/1413, Henry V crowned king of England.

1413, John age 4 at the death of his father; becoming hereditary Lord Great Chamberlain [ranking beneath Lord Privy Seal, and above Lord High Constable]. [Held by the family from 1133 to 1526 except during attainders.]

~1420, Elizabeth born in England, heir & d/o 1901422. Lord William Phelip & 1901423. Joan Bardolf.

8/31/1422, King Henry V died; his son Henry VI an infant.

11/6/1429, Henry VI crowned king of England.

John, 6th Lord Beaumont, married Elizabeth.

1/23/1431, Commission of peace … John de Bello Monte, knight, Leicestershire. (S) CPRs.

6/26/1432, Commission to William, bishop of Lincoln, John, duke of Norfolk, Henry, earl of Northumberland, John de Beaumont, knight, Ralph Crumwell, knight, … on complaint by the citizens of Lincoln … (S) CPRs.

1432-1439, John summoned to parliament.

7/27/1436, John created the Count of Boulogne in France. John had marched in the relief of Calais.

10/26/1436, Commission of peace … John de Bello Monte, knight, Leicestershire. (S) CPRs.

11/28/1439, Commission of peace … John de Bello Monte, knight, Leicestershire. (S) CPRs.

2/12/1440, John created viscount Beaumont, with a fee of 20 marks out of the revenues of co. Lincoln. [The 1st Viscount of England.] (S) CPRs.

4/1440, John created Knight of the Garter.

6/6/1441, Elizabeth’s father died.

8/10/1441, Grant to John, viscount Beaumont, of the keeping of all castles, manors, lordships, … which could descend to Henry son of the said viscount and son and heir of Elizabeth his wife, daughter of William Phelip, late lord Bardolf, … or to William, younger son of the said viscount and Elizabeth, or to any heir of his body, or to Joan, daughter of the said viscount and Elizabeth … (S) CPRs. [Multiple grants in 1441.]

Bef. 10/30/1441, Elizabeth died. [Grant of John identifies Elizabeth and her parents as deceased.]

12/14/1441, Licence for John, viscount Baumont, to found a perpetual chantry of two chaplains … and for the souls of Elizabeth late wife of the viscount, Henry late lord of Bello Monte, his father, and Elizabeth, his mother … (S) CPRs.

John married 2nd Katherine, d/o Ralph Neville, 1st Earl Westmorland. [No children.]

10/1443, Account of daily expenses of the household at Epworth (Lincs.) of John Viscount Beaumont and Katherine his wife. (S) UKNA.

9/16/1444, Commission of oyer and terminer to Humphrey, duke of Buckingham, William, marquis of Suffolk, John, viscount of Beaumont, William Lezouche, knight, … in Northamptonshire … (S) CPRs.

3/12/1445, Grant to John, viscount Beaumont, and his heirs male of the seat and place before and above all viscounts and the heirs and sons of all earls, and immediately after the earls of the realm in parliaments, councils and other places in the king’s presence and elsewhere. (S) CPRs.

6/1/1445, Commission to John, viscount Beaumont, and others to raise a loan in Lincs, with [nil] return endorsed. (S) UKNA.

11/13/1446, … a decree of John, viscount Beaumont, constable of England, and executor of a sentence at Rouen [France] against … (S) CPRs.

2/1447, John, Viscount Beaumont and the Queen’s Steward, arrested Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester [youngest s/o Henry IV], for treason against Henry VI, at his lodgings in London. [The Duke died, apparently of natural causes, soon afterwards while in custody.]

3/12/1447, John Viscount Beaumont named in the will of King Henry VI. (S) Testamenta Vetusta, V1, 1826, P22.

3/12/1447, John given possession of Elizabeth’s mother’s lands on her death.

8/4/1447, Grant for life to John, viscount Beaumont, for his lodging in Westminster palace, of a chamber called ‘Marcell Chamber’ within the king’s chamber called ‘Peyntedchamber,’ so that he be not disturbed by the king’s chamberlains, ushers or other officers. (S) CPRs.

5/6/1450, Grant for life to John, viscount Beaumont, of the office of chamberlain of England, with the usual fees, profits and wages. (S) CPRs.

Bef. 3/24/1451, John and Elizabeth’s eldest son Henry died without heirs. (S) CPRs.

6/7/1451, Grant for life to John, viscount Beaumont, of the office of steward of Boston, co. Lincoln. (S) CPRs.

2/1452, John one of many magnates in the army of Henry VI marching against the Duke of York.

3/1/1452, John and the King’s army faced the Yorkish forces at Welling in Kent. [The battle was averted through negotiations.]

1453, Petitioners: Henry Beaumont, knight [John’s brother]; … petitioners state that Joan Beaumont who had made a lawful contract of marriage was abducted by Edward Lancaster and many others, and married despite her early lawful contract. Lancaster and others then proceeded to make assaults on Joan's servants, and her and her family's goods and property. …, and that Joan Beaumont be handed over to the archbishop of York and [John] Viscount Beaumont so that she can sue them … Viscount Beaumont, brother to the petitioner. (S) UKNA.

Bef. 8/20/1453, William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester, John Beaumont, Viscount Beaumont, Ralph Cromwell, Lord Cromwell, … request letters allowing the incorporation of a guild to the Virgin Mary in the parish church of Coningsby which they have founded, … [Lincolnshire]. (S) UKNA.

1455, John given a petent of precedency over any future Viscounts.

1456, John wrote his will. (S) UKNA.

1456-57, Lincolnshire: Inquisition concerning franchises in the Manor of Benniworth, held by John, Archbishop of York, and John, Viscount Beaumont. (S) UKNA. [John held 17 courts, and 2 great courts.]

1458-59, John, Viscount Beaumont, and Katherine, Duchess of Norfolk, his wife to John, Abbot of Medmenham, and Geoffrey Pole, esquire : Demise, indented, of one third of the manor of Medmenham … (S) UKNA.

9/1459, John a commander under King Henry IV was part of a force of over 30,000 that faced off against Yorkist forces at Worcestor. The Yorkists withdrew to Ludford.

10/12/1459, Many Yorkist forces deserted and King Henry offered to pardons to those that surrenedered. The leaders of the Yorkist army had escaped in the night.

5/1460, John and other magnates named in a letter to the Archbishop of Cantebury accusing them of preventing acces to the King.

6/1460, The papal legate, Francesco dei Coppini, with Warwick, Salisbury, and March, had a bull stating that the Pope had excommunicated Wiltshire, Shrewsbury, and Beaumont [John] all others who opposed the Duke of York.

7/10/1460, John, a Lancastrian, slain at the battle of Northampton. Yorkist forces numbering over 20,000 faced a smaller royal army with their backs against the river Nene. The main cause of the defeat was the defection of the royal forces on the right flank commanded by Lord Edmund Grey of Ruthin. The battle lasted less than an hour. 300 Lancastrians were killed. John was killed attempting to defend the King [who was captured.]

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P64. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Family notes:
• 1460, Beaumont, William [Beaumont], kt, Viscount Beaumont and Lord Bardolph, son of John, late Viscount Beaumont, and the late Elizabeth [Phelip], his wife. Proof of age: Lincs. (S) UKNA.

Children of John and Elizabeth:

i. William, viscount Beaumont, born 4/1438 in Lincolnshire, England. [Heir]
7/10/1460, William captured at the battle of Northampton; attained; later pardoned.
11/1470, William’s lands restored by Henry VI.
1471-74, William allied with John, earl of oxford, against Edward IV.
8/23/1485, William fought against Richard III at the battle of Bosworth Field.
11/7/1485, William’s lands and titles restored by parliament.
12/19/1507, William died without heir.

ii. Joan Beaumont (475355), born 1441 in England.

iii. John Beaumont, born ? in England.
1452-53, Account for marriage portion of Joan d. of Humphrey, Duke of Buckingham, to John, s. of Viscount Beaumont. (S) UKNA.

Sunday, November 21, 2010

G23: 5909752

5909752. Warin de Lisle & 5909753. Alice Tyeys

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Aft. 11/11/1269, Warin born in England, heir & s/o 11819504. Gerard de Lisle & 11819505. Alice de Armenters.

~1285, Alice born in England, d/o 11819506. Lord Henry Tyeys & 11819507. Hawise ?.

1287, Warin Lord lisle, heir to his father of Kingston Lisle, Berkshire.

10/20/1297, Warin a witness of a quitclaim from Bennet, son and heir of Bennet de Blakenham, to Hugh de Sancto Philberto and his wife Alice, Bennet's sister.

5/1298-5/1319, Warin summoned to military service.

1303, Sir Warin was accused, with others, of theft and assault in Berkshire.

1/10/1303, Sir Warin was accused, with others, of theft and assault in Berkshire by Ralph de Monte Hermerii, earl of Gloucester and Heretford. (S) CPRs.

Warine married Alice.

7/7/1307, Edward II became king on the death of his father.

1308, Warin a conservator of the peace in the town and University of Oxford.

7/1308, Warin appointed Keeper of Windsor castle, the favorite home of King Edward II.

1315, Sir Warin a commissioner of oyer and terminer in Oxfordshire and Berkshire.

1315, Warine de Lisle the lord of the vill of Beedon, Berkshire.

1315, Warine de Lisle the lord of the vill of Beedon, Berkshire.

9/ 1320, Warin accused of incitement to assault and murder, and of protecting the assailants at his manors of Kingston and Beedon in Berkshire.

1321, Alice heir to her brother Henry Teyes, Lord Teyes who was executed.

1321 at Shirburn, Warin joined with Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and others against the King’s most hated favourites, the Despensers; allied with the monarch’s chief opponent, Thomas, Earl of Lancaster.

3/16/1322, Sir Warin a knight banneret at the battle of Boroughbridge, northwest of York, fighting for Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, against Edward II.

1322, Warin executed at Pontefract; dragged by horses and hanged; buried in the Church of the Black Friars.

1322, Alice heir to her brother, Henry, Lord Tyeys, executed after the battle of Boroughbridge.

12/1326, Alice had a grant of the custody of Kingston Castle and other of her husband’s manors.

1/20/1327, Edward II abdicated in favor of his son.

3/30/1327, Commission … to recover for Alice de Insula all the good of Warin de Insula, her late husband, and Henry Tyeys, her brother, in the county of Norfolk … county of Leicester, … county of Northampton, … Kyngston, late of the said Warin, and of Chilton, late of the said Henry, in the counties of Wilts, Oxford, and Berks. (S) CPRs.

11/19/1327, Commission to … William Trussel, … goods and other property … granted to Alice de Insula, late belonging to Warin de Insula, her husband, and Henry Gyeys, her brother … counties of Oxford, Berks, Wilts, Northampton and Leicester, and to compel delivery … (S) CPRs.

3/21/1330, General pardon to Alice late the wife of Warin de Insula, which Warin took part in the quarrel of Thomas, late earl of Lancaster. (S) CPRs.

4/25/1332, Alice obtained a charter for markets and fairs at Penzance and other manors in Cornwall. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516.

Bef. 1334, Alice her to her mother of the manor of Draycot, Wilts, which had passed to her father in 1285, then to her brother, then to her mother, then to the crown, then restored to her.

1334, Alice obtained leave to transfer Warin’s body, and that of her brother, Henry, to Chilton in Wiltshire where her ancestors were buried. Alice was supported in her request by William de Montagu, earl of Salisbury. (S) Calendar of the Bishop of Worcester, 1996.

1336, Alice granted a charter of free warren at Chilton, Wiltshire, and Kingston Lisle, Berkshire.

8/2/1347, Alice died, leaving Noke, Oxford, which she had inherited from her brother Henry, to her younger son Warin.

(S) UKNA. (S) The Complete Peerage, Cokayne, 1929. (S) A History of the County of Berksire, V4, 1924. (S) A History of the County of Wiltshire, V9, 1970.

Children of Warin and Alice:

i. Gerard de Lisle (2954876), born 1304 in England.

ii. Warin de Lisle, born ? in England. [Younger son]
1361, Warin died; his heir Warin de Lisle, his nephew by his older brother Gerard.

Saturday, November 20, 2010

G23: 5909748

5909748. Earl Hugh le Despencer & 5909749. Isabel de Beauchamp & 11819894. Sir Patrick de Chaworth

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1254, Patrick born in England, s/o 23639788. Sir Patrick de Chaworth & 23639789. Hawise de London.

Bef. 9/23/1258, Patrick’s father died.

3/1/1261, Hugh born in Rhyshall, England, s/o 11819496. Sir Hugh le Despenser & 11819497. Aline Basset.

~1265, Isabel born in England, d/o 11819498. William de Beauchamp & 11819499. Maud Fitz John.

8/4/1265, Hugh’s father died at the Battle of Evesham.

[––– Patrick & Isabel –––]

1265-66, Grant of a maritagium of the manor of Claycoton next to Lilbourne in Northamptonshire, by Warin de Bassingburn, to Sir Laurence de St Maur who married Warin’s niece Emma. Witnesses: Sir Pain de Chaworth, Sir John de Musegros, Sir Robert de Typetot, Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Sir John Russell, Sir Baldwin de Bassingburn, … (S) Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, Ward, 1995, P28.

12/4/1267, Grant to Patrick de Cadurcis of the fine due to the king for the service which the abbot of Shireburn ought to have done in the last summons of the army at Shrewsbury. (S) CPRs.

Patrick de Carducis, knt., lord of Kidwelley & Ogmore, Wales, and Kempsford, Gloucestershire, married Isabel.

1270, Patrick, his sibings, and ancestors named in a grant of his brother Payn to Blanchard abbey. (S) County Palatine of Durham, V1, Mackenzie, 1834, P253. [Omnibus etc. Paganus de Cadurcis filius & haeres Dnoe Hawisiae de London … dominorum Thomae de London, Patricii de Cadurcis et Willelmi et Mauricii de London, Warini de Bassingbourn, Dnae Evae de Tracey, Aleys et Gundre defunctorum … Item pro Dna Hawisia de London matre n'ra & pro nobis Pagano de Cadurcis, pro Dno Patricio & Hervico fratribus pr'is & pro Emma Eva & Agnete sororibus nostris …]

8/1270, Patrick, as a minor, joined his older brother Payn on crusade with Prince Edward.

11/10/1270, Patrick and the crusaders arrived in Tunis.

11/16/1272, Edward I became King of England while on crusade.

1273, Sir Roger de Leukanore rendering service of 1 knight to Patrick de Chaworth, one of the heirs of William Bruere. (S) Calendar IsPM, V2, Edward I.

By 8/2/1274, Patrick and the crusaders had returned to England.

Bef. 9/23/1274, Patrick’s mother died.

1/4/1279, Mandate … eight live doves to be delivered to Patrick de Cadurcis of the king’s gift … (S) CPRs.

1/25/1279, Letters for … Patrick de Cadurcis, going beyond seas on the king’s affairs, nominating … (S) CPRs.

1279, Patrick, age 25, heir to his older brother Payn.

9/24/1279, Patrick de Cadurcis came into chancery and acknowledged, for Robert de Muscegros, that he owes to Queen Eleanor, the king’s consort, 20 marks. (S) CCRs.

12/8/1280, Grant, at the instance of Patrick de Cadurcis, their lord, to the bailiffs and good men of kedwelly for murage for give years … (S) CPRs.

1281, Patrick Chaworth claims certain rights in Haveldon, in the hundred of Worth, county Wilts, which was given by a certain Warine, son of Gerald, to William de London, ancestor of Patrick. (S) Archaeologia Cambrensis, V3, 2009, P17.

1282, Patrick fought in Wales.

1283, Margery Clifford holding dower in her first husbands lands in Wiltshire, Patrick Chaworth having the revisionary rights.

Bef. 7/7/1283, Patrick died; his only daughter Maud inherited Kidwelly and Ogmore in Wales.

[––– Hugh & Isabel –––]

1271, Hugh’s mother Aline married 2nd Roger Bigod, 7th Earl of Norfolk, Marshall of England.

Bef. 4/11/1281, Aline died.

5/28/1281, Grant to William de Bello Campo, earl of Warwick, of the marriage of Hugh le Despenser, tenant in chief. (S) CPRs.

5/28/1281, Order to cause Hugh le Despenser to have … the lands of Hugh le Despenser, deceased, which were taken into the king’s hands by reason of the death of Alina la Despenser, the ransom whereof the late king in the form of the Dictum of Kenilleworth gave to Philip Basset, who bequesthed it to Alina his daughter, who bequeathed it to Hugh le Despenser, her son and heir and executor of her will. (S) CCRs.

6/28/1283, John summoned to Shrewsbury by writ from Rhuddlan to the king to hold a colloquium to ordain what should be done with David, brother of Llewellyn, formerly prince of Wales. (S) The Titular Barony of Clavering, 1891, P16.

1285-86, Hugh married Isabel.

1286, Hugh fined 2000 marks for marrying without a royal license.

5/27/1286, Letters for Hugh le Despenser, going beyond seas, nominating Thomas de London … (S) CPRs.

8/20/1289, Pardon to Hugh le Despenser of 100 marks out of 300 due from him for corn and other goods sold … (S) CPRs.

10/13/1289, Hugh going beyond the seas with Roger le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk. (S) CPRs.

6/15/1294, Protection with clause volumus, for one year, Hugh le Despenser, going as the king’s envoy. (S) CPRs.

1295, Hugh created a baron by writ of summons to Parliament. He was one of the few barons to remain loyal to Edward II during the controversy regarding Piers Gaveston.

12/12/1295, Letters for Hugh le Despenser, going beyond seas on the king’s service, nominating … (S) CPRs.

1/1/1296, Ratification of a transfer by William de Valencia, earl of Pembroch, the king’s uncle, to Hugh le Despenser, of the king’s grant to him of the marriage of the heirs of Philip Burnel, tenant in chief. (S) CPRs.

8/22/1296 at Berwick upon Tweed, Scotland, The noble men the Lords John earl of Warenne, Roger earl of Norfolk, William earl of Warwick, Patrick earl of Dunbar and March, and Gilbert earl of Angus, Lords John de Hastings, John Wake, Hugh le Despenser, …, barons, witnesses, having been specially called in person … came to the full parliament of the lord king of England … [to revocate any previous agreements between Scotland and King Philip IV of France.]

3/21/1297, Power to Hugh le Despenser to go personally to the said assembly [of archbishops, bishops, prelates and others of the clergy at Mid-Lent in London], with those of the king’s council whom he shall summon, and proclaim the said prohibition [from ordaining or doing anything to the king’s prejudice]. (S) CPRs.

8/28/1297, … Hugh le Despenser, tenant in chief, going beyond the seas with the king on his service, … (S) CPRs. [Edward left England with 500 ships to attack France and assert his rights.]

1298, Maud le Barber in London court testified that Saer le Barber had said Sir Hugh “kept more robbers with him than any man in England.”

5/31/1298, Confirmation of a demise for seven years by Ralph de Meenhermer, earl of Gloucester and Hertford, and Joan his consort, the king’s daughter, to Hugh le Despenser of the manors of Rowell and Navesby, co. Northampton, … (S) CPRs.

6/1298, Isabel’s father died.

7/22/1298, Hugh at the battle of Falkirk and the defeat of William Wallace.

3/14/1300, Restitution to Ralph son of Ralph Basset of Drayton, … in consideration of 1,000 marks, which Guy, earl of Warwick, Hugh le Despenser, Hugh de Curtenay, … have acknowledged themselves in the Chancery to owe to Edmund, earl of Cornwall … (S) CPRs.

3/28/1300, “Royal letters patent: inspeximus and confirmation of Magna Carta … Witnesses: … Hugh le Despenser, …” (S) UKNA.

9/24/1300, Protection with clause volumus, for one year, for Hugh le Despenser, going to the court of Rome on the king’s pecial affairs. (S) CPRs.

1/1/1301, Letters for Hugh le Despenser, gone to the court of Rome on the king’s affairs, … (S) CPRs.

4/1301, Isabel’s mother died.

11/7/1302, The King summoned the militaty tenants of the Crown to be at Berwick-upon-Tweed on May 26th … Thomas, earl of Lancaster, … John de Ferrers, Hugh le Despencer, … Ralph Basset of Drayton, Theobald de Verdun, senior, Theobald de Verdun Junior, … (S) Collections for a History of Staffordshire, V8, P25.

11/1305, Hugh sent by the king to Pope Clement V to secure Edward’s release from the oaths he had taken to observe the charters in 1297.

Bef. 5/30/1306, Isabel died.

6/14/1306, Grant to Hugh le Despenser, son of Hugh le Despenser, between whom and Eleanor daughter of Gilbert, sometime earl of Gloucester and Hertford, the king’s neice, a marriage is contracted, with the king’s and the said Hugh’s assent, the said Hugh promising before the king to give them 200£ a year in land, for life, … (S) CPRs.

2/25/1307 at Westminster, Hugh a carrier of the royal robes at the coronation of King Edward II. (S) Weir, P33.

1308, Hugh was the only baron to side with the King in the quarrel about Piers de Gavaston.

5/23/1308, Grant to Hugh le Despenser of 2,544£ 6s 8d … in discharge of that sum due to him … (S) CPRs.

6/1309, loyal to Edward II, Hugh was “dismissed” from the King’s household by opposition barons.

2/8/1311, Hugh sold the rights to the lands and marriage of Otto de Bodrigan to Henry de Campo Arnulphi. (S) CPRs.

9/29/1311, Licence for Hugh le Despenser, the elder, to creneliate all his dwelling-houses and chambers throughout the realm. (S) CPRs.

10/9/1311, Sale by the king to Hugh le Despenser of the custody of the lands of Nicholas Poyntz, tenant in chief, together with knight’s fees … to hold during the minority of the heirs, together with their marriages. Hugh le Despenser to pay 500 marks. Vacated because surrendered and cancelled. (S) CPRs. [Reassigned 11/28/1312.]

6/14/1312, Re-appointment of Hugh le Despenser to the custody of the office of keeper of the forest beyond Trent, … (S) CPRs.

11/14/1312, Grant to Hugh le Despenser, … in the sum of 3,000 marks … of all custodies and marriages in the king’s hands … (S) CPRs.

5/3/1313, Protection for Hugh le Despenser, the elder, going beyond seas on the king’s service [with 17 others in his retinue including son Hugh. Hugh accompanied the King to Paris and then to Pontoise, France.] (S) CPRs.

6/24/1314, Hugh at the battle of Bannockburn. Hugh then accompanied the King to Dunbar, then by sea to Berwick.

12/4/1314, “… agreement between Sir Hugh le Despenser the father and John de St. Amand … that John shall take Margaret, Hugh’s daughter, to wife; …” (S) A Descriptive Catalog of Ancient Deeds.

11/23/1315, Licence for John de Crumbwelle and Idonia his wife to grant 11.5 knights’ fees … successive remainders … Hugh le Despenser the younger, Hugh le Despenser the elder, and to Edward son of Hugh le Despenser the younger … (S) CPRs.

6/1316, Hugh became King Edward II’s chief administrator.

1317, Hugh banished from England on the force of a coalition of barons.

1318, Edward II brought Hugh and his son back to the council. Hugh profited from his son’s rise in influence with Edward II and rose in power.

9/7/1319, Hugh [and his son] participated in the seige of Berwick on Tweed, Scotland.

5/1321, the “Marcher lords” [bordering on Wales] attacked the Despenser’s estates.

8/19/1321, Hugh’s corruption and unjust behaviour led to his being exiled again, along with his son. Hugh went to Flanders, and then to Bordeaux.

2/1322, Edward II recalled Hugh and his son to England.

5/10/1322, Hugh named Earl of Winchester; an action which enraged the Queen.

3/20/1322, Hugh a member of the group finding Thomas, Earl of Lancaster guilty of treason and sentenced to death.

5/30/1323, “Our Lord the King being at Bishopthorp near York … caused to be summoned before him at his council there … Edmund, Earl of Kent, his brother, … Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winton, … Hugh le Despenser, junior, … William le Ros of Hamelake, … to deliberate upon a certain truce between the said king and Robert de Bruce …” (S) Monumenta de Insula Manniae, Oliver, 1860-62.

2/1324, in Parliament, Hugh accused Bishop Orleton of aiding in Roger Mortimer’s escape from the Tower.

1/1325, Hugh [in disagreement with his son] supported sending Queen Isabella to France on a peace mission.

9/27/1326, King Edward and both Despensers were in the Tower when they heard that the Queen had landed in England with a great army [which was incorrect – she only had 700 soldiers.]

1326, Invading from France, Queen Isabella and her lover, Roger Mortimer, led a rebellion against Edward II. Hugh was holding Bristol for the King. Hugh did not fight and threw himself on the mercy of the Queen.

10/27/1326, Hugh, tried by Baron William Trussell, hanged in Bristol, all of his honors forfeit.

(S) Queen Isabella, Weir, 2005. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P275.

Family notes:

·         1283 IPM in Wiltshire: Patrick de Cadurcis held … the manor of Staundon … the manor of Berewik, … barony of Kenemareford … 1284 IPM in Wiltshire: Patrick de Cadurcis held the maor of Hanedon … by service of half a knight’s fee, … extent of Inglesham … sum of all the sums, £56 5s 11.5d. (S) The Index Library, V37, 1908, P145.

Child of Patrick and Isabel:

i. Maud Chaworth (5909947), born 2/2/1282 in England.

Children of Hugh and Isabel:

i. Hugh le Despenser III (2954874), born ~1285 in England.

ii. Philip le Despenser (30421136), born ~1287 in England.

iii. Isabel le Despencer (11820441), born ~1290 in England.

iv. Margaret le Despenser (7604751), born ~1295 in England.

Thursday, November 18, 2010

G23: 5909718

5909718. Baron John Wake & 5909719. Joan de Fiennes

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1265, Joanna, born in Bolonois, France, d/o 4997434. William de Fiennes & 4997435. Blanche de Brienne.

~1275, John born in Northamptonshire, England, heir & s/o 4997404. Baron Baldwin Wake & 4997405. Hawise de Quincy.

2/4/1282, John’s father died.

7/20/1282, Appointment … manor of Blichesworth, co. Northampton, … reason of minority of John son and heir of Baldwin Wake, tenant in chief, … (S) CPRs.

10/27/1282, Baldwin’s heir John a minor, the king granted custody of the lands in Northamptonshire to Edmund, Earl of Cornwall.

10/20/1283, … John de Boscehale, tenant in chief of John Wake, the king’s ward ; … (S) CPRs.

By 3/1284, John’s mother died.

5/8/1285, Grant to Eleanor, the king’s mother, of the custody, during minority of John, son and heir of Hawisia, of the manor of Wynterburne [and Warre], late of the inheritance of Hawisia, late the wife of Baldwin Wake. (S) CPRs.

11/15/1288,Protection for John Wake, now on his way to the king in Gascony, until a fortnight after Michaelmas. (S) CPRs. [King Edward and Eleanor were residing in Gascony, the 2nd year of a 3-year trip.]

1289-90, Joan a damsel in the Queen’s household; and a relative of Marguerite of France [who in 1299 became the 2nd wife of Edward I].

1291 in Kent, England, Joanna married John, Lord of Wake, Baron of Liddel Strength, Cumberland and Bourne, Lincolnshire.

9/24/1291, Grant to Joan wife of John Wake of the marriage of Thomas son and heir of Robert de Greylly, tenant in chief, to the use of one of the sisters of the said John. (S) CPRs.

1291-92, John, son and heir of Baldwin Wake, gave Hugh Wake, his brother, the manor of Winterborne Stoke, Wiltshire. (S) The Ancestor, 1902, P112.

John heir of relative John de Stuteville. [John’s maternal grandmother was Joan de Stuteville.]

1292, John holding the market and fair at Liddel, Cumberland, previously held of John de Stuteville.

11/25/1293, Debtor: John Wake, knight, lord of Liddel {Lydel} [Cumberland]. Amount 230m. Before John Breton, Warden of London. (S) UKNA.

3/1/1294, letters for John Wake, going to Scotland, nominating … for one year. (S) CPRs.

4/26/1294, John and Joan had letters of protection for going beyond the seas. (S) CPRs.

5/30/1294, Grant. 1) John Wake, lord of Lidel & Chestrefeld. 2) His men of C., holders of burgages. (1) to (2) enjoyment of same liberties and free customs they had from Wm. de Brewer, sen., predecessor of (1), confirmed by Hen. III & Wm. le Brewer jun. [Original grant to Sir William Briwere, Justiciar of England, in 1220. Sir William was John’s paternal grand uncle.]

9/1294, John granted the manor of Buttercrambe [North Riding, Yorkshire] to Walter de Langton, bishop of Chester. (S) UKNA.

10/10/1294, Licence for John Wake, going to Gascony on the king’s service, … (S) CPRs.

1/1295, John had possession of all of his lands.

10/1/1295, John summoned to parliament by writ. (S) The Book of Dignities, Haydn, 1851.

11/12/1295, John, a banneret, proceding to Wales in the King’s service, John de Wasteneys of Staffordshire in his retinue. (S) Collections for a History of Staffordshire. (S) The English Aristocracy at War, 2008, P66.

4/4/1296 at Berwick, James de Stafford brought a suit against Robert de Umfraville, of the company of John Wake. (S) A Plea Roll of Edward I’s Army in Scotland.

4/27/1296, John with the English forces at the battle of Dunar.

8/22/1296 at Berwick upon Tweed, Scotland, The noble men the Lords John earl of Warenne, Roger earl of Norfolk, William earl of Warwick, Patrick earl of Dunbar and March, and Gilbert earl of Angus, Lords John de Hastings, John Wake, Hugh le Despenser, …, barons, witnesses, having been specially called in person … came to the full parliament of the lord king of England … [to revocate any previous agreements between Scotland and King Philip IV of France.]

1297, John, Captain of the March of Scotland.

1297, John Wak (Wake); Joan [Wak (Wake)], wife of John Wake; Reginald Wyckewane, keeper of the manor of Deeping, named in a petition of the Prior of Spalding. (S) UKNA.

1297, 1299, 1300, John summoned to server against the Scots.

10/18/1297, Appointemnt of John Wake, Robert de Clifford and John de Hudleston, as captains fo the custody of the march of Scotland in the counties of Cumberland and Westmoreland. (S) CPRs.

1/27/1298, Application by Sir John Wake for protections for 13 of his followers (named) going to Scotland. (S) UKNA.

6/7/1298, Pardon, at the instance of Juliana [Joan], consort of John Wake, to John son of Stephen de Cotingham … (S) CPRs.

7/22/1298, John fought in the victory at Falkirk against William Wallace. The Scots were routed, but Wallace escaped. “Or two bars gules in chief three toroteaux.”

9/12/1298, Confirmation of a quit-claim by John Wake, lord of Lydel, son and heir of Baldwin Wake, tenant in chief, to William fitz Alan of the manor of Suthhicham, … (S) CPRs.

1/5/1299, Grant, in fee simple, … to John Wake and Joan, his wife, of the manors of Cotingham, Wnenton, Kirkeby Moresheved, Aton, and Hemelingotn, in the county of York, … and of the manors of … co. York, which Leticia Wake holds in dower of the inheritiance … (S) CPRs.

Bef. 1300, John enfeoffed his uncle Sir Hugh Wake of Deeping in the half fee in Blisworth, reserving to himself the advowson of the church and an annual rent of £10 from the manor.

Bef. 4/10/1300, John died. (S) UKNA. [Custody of heir Thomas given to John de Segrave.]

11/15/1302, Licence for Joan, late the wife of John Wake, for the discharge of the debts of her husband, to demise for six years to whomsoever she will her manor of Deping, … (S) CPRs.

9/8/1304, Joan granted a weekly market at East Deeping, Lincolnshire at the instance of Queen Margaret.

2/12/1307, Commission … on complaint of Joan, late the wife of John Wake, that whereas in her fee at Upsale, co. York, she caused beasts to be impounded by Wlliam de Malton, her serjeant, for customs and services due to her, … (S) CPRs.

2/16/1307, Joan, late the wife of John Wake and Thomas, son and heir of the said John and the heirs of the said John, granted a market and fair at Arthuret, Cumberland.

9/12/1307, Writ of Edward II from Berwick-on-Tweed to the sheriff of Roxburgh concerning dower of Joan, late the wife of John Wake in Liddesdale with return endorsed. (S) UKNA.

11/12/1307, Licence, at the request of Joan, late the wife of John Wake, to John, their son, to acquire land to the yearly value of 100£. (S) CPRs.

11/15/1308, Joan, late the wife of John Wake, and her son Thomas granted a fair at Bourne, Lincolnshire.

7/12/1308, Joan had letters of protection for going beyond the seas. (S) CPRs.

8/5/1309, Joan had letters of protection for going beyond the seas. (S) CPRs.

Bef. 10/26/1309, Joan died. (S) CPRs.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P467. (S) Blisworth, A History of the County of Northampton, V4, 1937. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs in England and Wales to 1516.

Family notes:
• John had 2 sons that succeeded him as baron, both dying without issue. (S) Northamptonshire Notes & Queries, V2, 1888.

Children of John and Joan:

i. Thomas Wake, born 1297 in England.
4/12/1310, … lands in lydel, formerly held by Joan, late the wife of John Wake. This custody … during the minority of Thomas son and heir of John Wake, … (S) CPRs.
1317, Thomas, 2nd Lord Wake of Liddel Strength, Cumberland, married Blanche, d/o Earl Henry de lancastre.
1326, Thomas an advisor to Queen Isabella and King Edward III.
5/3/1349, Thomas died.

ii. Margaret Wake (2954859), born by 1300 in England.

iii. John Wake, born ? in England.

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