Featured Post

||| LINK to author's Amazon page

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Sir Nicholas Latimer & Joan Hody

475278. Sir Nicholas Latimer & 475279. Joan Hody 

~1430, Nicholas Latymer born in Duntish, Dorset, England, s/o 950556. John Latimer & 950557. Margaret Pipard.

~1430, Joan born in England, d/o 950558. Sir John Hody & 950559. Elizabeth Jewe.

12/17/1441, Sir John Hody (950558) wrote his will: … Elizabeth his wife for her life, … He directs that the agreements made on the marriage of Johanna his daughter with Nicholas, son of John Latimer, esq., should be fulfilled. … To Nicholas Latimer and to Johanna his wife, a piece of silver with a cover. (S) Jewe Family of Dorset.

6/8/1453, Nicholas Latymer esquire ; on commission to distribute £200 16s ld ; in the county of Dorset to impoverished towns. (S) CFRs.

6/12/1453, John Caraunt (the younger) esquire, and Nicholas Latymer esquire, knights coming to Parliament. (S) CFRs.

11/5/1453, Commitment of the counties of Somerset and Dorset to  Nicholas Latymer, esquire ; during pleasure, so that he answer at the Exchequer as sheriff. (S) CFRs.

11/7/1458, Commitment of the county of Gloucester to Nicholas Latymer, esquire, during pleasure, so that he answer at the Exchequer as sheriff. (S) CFRs.

1459, Nicholas’ father died.

12/30/1460, Nicholas fought for Henry IV at the battle of Wakefield where Yorkist the earl of Salisbury was captured, and the Duke of York, and earl of Rutland were killed. [The Duke of York’s son became King Edward IV.]

3/29/1461, Nicholas fought as a Lancastrian at the Battle of Towton, in Yorkshire, a Yorkist victory. In 10 hours thousands fell to the sword, lance, and spear. In the aftermath, the bridge over the river collapsed killing many from both sides. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil with as many as 28,000 killed. Yorkist forces, had a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned King of England, beginning the House of York.

1461-63, Nicholas attained.

1463, Nicholas pardoned.

1466, Nicholas granted some of his former lands, and entered the service of the Duke of Clarence [Yorkist, brother of Edward IV.]

1466-68, Nicholas knighted.

6/3/1468, Nicholas’ act of reversal finally recovered Loxton; but Sir Edward Grey [later Viscount Lisle] apparently refused to deliver the property.

6/19/1468, The Duke of Clarence ruled in Nicholas’ favor; while Nicholas had to pay Grey £100 yearly for 7 years.

6/20/1468, Debtor: Nicholas Latimer, knight [of Newton in Sturminster Newton and Buckland Newton Hundreds, Dorset, and held manor of Alton in Sherborne Hundred. Creditor: Edward Grey, Knight. Amount: £100. (S) UKNA.

1470, Nicholas, High Sheriff of Dorset and Somerset.

1470, Nicholas joined the Duke of Clarence in his revolt; again attained.

10/30/1470, Henry VI restored to the throne.

4/11/1471, Edward IV restored to the throne, partly due to Duke Clarence’s return of support.

5/6/1471, Nicholas, a Yorkist, made knight-banneret after the battle of Tewkesbury. The battle was at the confluence of the Avon and Severn rivers. The Lancanstrians arrived 1st after a 40 mile march and established a strong defensive position. Seeing an opening, Somerset attacked Edward IV at the Yorkist center. He was flanked, and Edward, s/o Henry VI, age 18, was killed in the assault. [The only heir-apparent of England to die in battle.]

1472-75, Nicholas a Knight of the Shire for Dorset.

1475, Nicholas served with the Duke of Clarence in France.

2/18/1478, Duke of Clarence executed for treason [sentenced pronounced by the Duke of Buckingham.]

1483, Nicholas, Chamberlain of the Duke of Buckingham. (S) Richard III, Horrox, 1991, P162.

7/6/1483, Richard III crowned King of England. Sir Nicholas Latimer was one of the many earls, lords, and knights in the King’s procession through London. (S) Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland, V3, 1808, P398.

By 10/1483, The Duke of Buckingham in a conspiracy with Henry Tudor [later Henry VII] against Richard III. A £1000 reward was put on the Duke’s head.

11/2/1483, The Duke was executed for treason; Nicholas was also named in the associated attainder with treason. Nicholas pardoned [although he apparently then joined the forces of Henry Tudor.]

11/16/1484, Indenture between Nicholas Latymer knight on the one part, and John Mordaunt and Edith (Nicholas’ daughter) his wife, daughter and heir of the said Nicholas on the other, witnesseth that the 2 parties are here agreed that Sir Nicholas on request by John shall make a sufficient estate in land to 8 persons, 4 at the denomination of John Mordaunt, of the manor of Diuelissh co. Dorset … for surety of the estate John shall pay to Nicholas £40. (S) CCRs.

8/22/1485, Nicholas fought at the battle of Bosworth as a Lancastrian, ending the 30-year War of the Roses. Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, after invading southwest Wales, raised an army of 5,000. Richard III was allied with the Duke of Norfolk and the Earl of Northumberland and an army of 10,000. The Yorkist were overwhelmed. King Richard III and the Duke of Norfolk were both killed.

10/30/1485, Henry VII crowned King of England. King Henry VII reversed Nicholas’ last attainder, and installed him on the Dorset bench, where he served until his death.

1497, Nicholas joined the southwest insurrection; pardoned after a fine of 400 marks.

10/20/1502, IPM of John Cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury. Dorset: … messuages &c. in Develych, are held of Nicholas Latymer, knight, by service of doing suit to the court of his manor of Develych twice a year, for all service, and they are worth 10s. (S) CIsPM.

2/8/1504, Nicholas wrote his will.                                                                

Bef. 4/17/1505, Nicholas of Duntish, co. Dorset, died; the last male of this line, in possession of Zeals Ailesbury manor.

(S) A Gen. and Heraldic Hist. of the Commoners of Great Britain, Burke, 1835, P681. (S) Fasciculus Mervinensis, … Drake, P9. (S) Richard III and His Rivals, Hicks, 1991, P143. (S) Richard III, Ross, 1984, P109.

Family notes:

·         2/6/1426, There is a ‘Nicholas Latymer’ associated with persons from Dorset. (S) CCRs.

Child of Nicholas and Joan:

i. Edith Latimer (237639), born ~1455 in England. [Heir]


Sunday, November 28, 2010

Duke Edmund Beaufort & Duchess Eleanor Beauchamp

184678. Duke Edmund Beaufort & 184679. Duchess Eleanor Beauchamp 

1406, Edmund born in England, s/o 369356. Marquess John Beaufort & 369357. Margaret de Holland.

9/1408, Eleanor born in Walthamstow, Essex, England, co-heir & d/o 369358. Richard Beauchamp & 369359. Elizabeth Berkeley.

3/20/1413, Henry V succeeded as King of England.

6/2/1420, King Henry V married Catherine of Valois, France

1422, Eleanor coheir to her mother, inheriting 1/3 of the baronies of Berkeley, Lisle, and Tyeys.

8/31/1422, King Henry V died, succeeded by Henry VI, an infant.

[––Eleanor & Thomas––]

Eleanor 1st married Thomas Roos, 8th Lord Roos of Helmesley.

1426-27, Edmund’s affair with King Henry V’s widow, Queen Katherine, created a political scandal.

1427, Edmund granted the county of Mortain in Normandy, France.

8/18/1430, Thomas Roos died.

1431, Edmund present at Henry VI’s coronation banquet in Paris, France.

1431-53, Edmund held military commands in the French wars.

1436, Edmund invested as a Knight of the Garter.

1433, Edmund Ambassador to the King of Scotland.

[––Edmund & Eleanor––]

Bef. 10/31/1434, Edmund married Eleanor.

12/21/1439, King Henry VI; and Edmund [Beaufort] earl of Dorset and Eleanor his wife, John Lord Talbot and Margaret his wife, and George Lord Latymer and Elizabeth his wife. At the request of Edmund, Eleanor, John, Margaret, George and Elizabeth, the king has inspected his writ to the escheator of Gloucestershire to make partition between Eleanor, Margaret and Elizabeth, daughters and coheirs of Elizabeth late countess of Warwick after the death of their father Richard [Beauchamp], who held the lands by the courtesy of England. (S) UKNA, BCM/A/1/1/50.

8/1441, Edmund made Earl of Dorset for his service in the relief of Calais.

6/24/1443, Edmund, created 4th Earl of Somerset, 1st Marquess of Dorset.

5/27/1444, Edmund succeeded his brother as Earl of Somerset.

10/1444, Edmund given 13 manors in the West Country which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P44.

1444-1452, Edmund summoned to parliament.

1445, Edmund & Eleanor received a papal dispensation to remain married. [3rd degree].

3/1445, Future Queen Margaret sold silver plate to Eleanor in order to pay her sailors that would take her to England.[Eleanor was likely in the large group sent to retrieve Margaret from France. Eleanor and Margaret became very close friends.]

1445, Edmund replaced the Duke of York as Lt. of Normandy. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P47.

5/4/1446, Roll of the court of John [Talbot], earl of Shrewbury and Lord Talbot, and Margaret his wife, eldest daughter of Richard Beauchamp, late earl of Warwick, Edmund [Beaufort], marquess of Dorset, and Eleanor his wife, Warwick's second daughter, and George Lord Latemer and Elizabeth his wife, Warwick's third daughter. (S) UKNA.

12/1446, The Queen, earl Edmund, Edmund’s uncle the Cardinal, and others counciled King Henry VI against his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester.       

1447, Edmund appointed Governor-General of France and of the Duchies of Normandy and Guienne. Edmund took residence at Rouen with a salary of £20,000 a year. This was during a 2-year truce with France.

3/31/1448, Edmund created 1st Duke Somerset.

1449, Eleanor co-heiress to her niece Anne Beauchamp, Countess of Warwick.

7/1/1449, (1) John Beauchamp, knight, lord of Beauchamp, John Fortescu, chief justice, and William Yelverton, justice; (2) Edmund [Beaufort] duke of Somerset, and Eleanor his wife, John [Talbot] earl of Shrewsbury and Margaret his wife, and George lord of Latymer, knight, and Elizabeth his wife; (3) James Berkeley, lord of Berkeley, knight. Award by John Beauchamp, John and William, as arbitrators in the dispute between Edmund and the others on the one part and James Berkeley on the other part, concerning the lands [etc.] of Thomas late lord of Berkeley in Glos. and Som. (S) UKNA.

7/1449, Charles VII formally declared war on England. [In a little over a month the English would lose 30 towns.]

10/1449, Pressed by the French, Edmund gave up Rouen, 6 other strongholds, and a large sum of money “for the deliverance of his person, wife, children, and goods.”

6/24/1450, Edmund surrendered Caen to King Charles of France.

8/1/1450, Edmund returned to London with “many poor soldiers.” The Duke of York accused Edmund of treason.

1450, Edmund’s quarrels with the Duke of York continued. Edmund had to escape capture during a riot in London on the barge of the Earl of Devon. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P56.

12/1/1450, Edmund impeached by a York-controlled parliament and taken prisoner to the Tower. Edmund was released the same day by the Queen. [During the day Edmund’s home had been ransacked.]

1451, King Henry appointed Edmund as Captain of Calais. [Calais and Aquitaine were all that remained of English possessions in France.]

8/3/1451, The duchy of Acquitaine fell to the French.

1451, Edmund returned to England.

9/1451, The private armies of Duke Edmund and the Duke of York converged on Tauton, Somerset, where Thomas Courtenay, earl of Devon was besieging Lord William Bonville (131282). (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P57.

10/8/1451, James lord of Berkeley, William Berkeley, knight, James Berkeley, Maurice Berkeley and Thomas Berkeley, esquires; and John [Talbot] earl of Shrewsbury and his wife Margaret, Edmund [Beaufort] duke of Somerset and his wife Eleanor and George Lord Latymere and his wife Elizabeth. James and the others have granted that they will assure to the earl and the others and the heirs of Margaret, Eleanor and Elizabeth, by fine or other method, the manors of Wotton, Symondeshale and Coueley, … James, William, James, Maurice and Thomas bind themselves in £10,000 to perform these promises. (S) UKNA. [These were the heirs of Isabel Dispenser’s lands, who as widow of the earl of Worcester had married as his 2nd wife Eleanor’s father.]

11/1451, The King summoned the parties in the 9/1451 dispute, including Edmund, to his High Court of Judgement at Coventry. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P58.

3/3/1452 at Dartford, in order to avoid a battle against the Duke of York, King Henry ordered the arrest of Edmund. The Queen defended Edmund and he was not arrested. [Had the battle been fought, it would have been the 1st battle of the War of the Roses.]

1452, Edmund granted the Lordship of the Isle of Wight for life.

5/20/1452, Edmund, duke of Somerset, granted a fair at Woking, Surrey. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs to 1516.

10/1452, An English army under John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, took control of a large part of Aquitaine.

6/1453, Edmund granted wardship of George Neville. Edmund then demanded that the Earl of Warwick hand over the lands George had inherited [which Warwick refused to do.]

7/1453, at Sheen, Edmund attened a king’s council in which the king ordered Warwick to turn over the Neville lands to Edmund. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P65.

1453, Edmund the Captain of Calais, France. (S) UKNA.

10/1453, Edmund was the sponsor for King Henry’s son Edward’s baptism (b.10/13/1453) [the King was ill, and the Queen had not completed her time of “churching”. This also eliminated the Duke of York as presumptive heir to the crown. There were also rumors that Edmund was the father of Edward.]

10/19/1453, After the death of John Talbot, Charles VII retook Bordeaux, ending the 100 Years War. Only Calais remained a possession of England.

3/27/1454, The King was ill, the Duke of York was named Regent, and Edmund was deposed and committed to the Tower.

12/25/1454, King Henry recovered from a semi-comatose state after 16 months. [There is evidence that he never completely recovered.]

2/16/1455, Edmund released from imprisonment.

2/1455, Richard of York [white rose] formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury (1901430)] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset (184678), Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham [commander], with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces. [The King’s request for support had been sent out too late. Many arrived after the battle.] The Yorkists also had advantages in cannon and archers.

5/22/1455, Early in the morning the Duke of York began the siege of St. Albans. Soon after the forces led by the Duke of Buckingham, and supported Edmund, Duke of Somerset, arrived.

5/22/1455, Edmund slain at the 1st Battle of St. Albans fighting against Richard, Duke of York; buried within the Lady chapel of St. Albans. [His son Henry was wounded.] The royalists lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford. This was the opening battle of the 30-year, Lancaster-York, “War of the Roses”.

[––Eleanor––]

3/4/1457, Eleanor named administrator of Edmund’s estates.

Eleanor remarried to Walter Rokesley, Esq.

1463, Eleanor’s son Henry declared support for King Henry VI against King Edward IV; and Eleanor was imprisoned.

3/12/1467, Eleanor died at Baynard’s Castle, London.

(S) The Royal Lineage of Our Noble and Gentle Families, 1883, Foster, P21. (S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P756. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Family notes:

·         10/17/1491 at Parliament. ‘… Eleanor (184679), late duchess of Somerset, Robert Spencer, knight, and Eleanor (92339) his wife, countess of Wiltshire, another of the daughters of the said duchess, Mary, Countess Rivers, daughter of Elizabeth, another daughter of the said duchess, Thomas Burgh, knight, and Edward Burgh, knight, son of Margaret, another of the daughters of the said duchess, William Paston esquire, Agnes Paston, Elizabeth Paston (46161), daughters of Anne (92323), another of the daughters of the said duchess, and Richard Frye esquire, and Jane his wife, another daughter of the same duchess, and to the heirs of each of them, … (S) Parliamentary Rolls, 2005.

Children of Edmund and Eleanor:

i. Henry Beaufort, born ? in England.

5/15/1464, Henry was captured and killed at the battle of Hexham. [Never married, 1 natural son by Joan de la Montaign – Charles, ancestor of the “Somerset” families.]

ii. Eleanor Beaufort (92339), born ~1436 in England. [Eldest daughter]

iii. Margaret Beaufort born ? in England.

Margaret married Earl Humphrey Stafford.

iv. Edmund Beaufort, born ~1439 in England.

5/6/1471, Edmund, 4th Duke of Somerset, as a Lancanstrian, was taken prisoner at the Battle of Tewkesbury and beheaded 2 days later. The battle was at the confluence of the Avon and Severn rivers. The Lancanstrians arrived 1st after a 40 mile march and established a strong defensive position. Seeing an opening, Somerset attacked Edward IV at the Yorkist center. He was flanked, and Edward, Prince of Wales, age 18, was killed in the assault. [The only heir-apparent of England to die in battle.]

v. Anne Beaufort (92323), born 3/24/1443 at Baynard castle in London, England.


Lord John Clifford & Elizabeth Percy

1901322. Lord John Clifford & 1901323. Elizabeth Percy

4/23/1389, John born in Hart, Northumberland, England, heir & s/o 3802644. Thomas de Clifford & 3802645. Elizabeth de Roos.

1391, John’s father died.

1392, John age 3.

~1396, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 3802646. Sir Henry Percy & 3802647. Elizabeth de Mortimer.

9/30/1399, Henry IV succeeded Richard II as King of England.

2/28/1403, John’s paternal grandmother, Maud, died.

3/15/1403, John’s uncle William de Clifford, ‘chivaler,’ has keeping of the lands of John’s grandmother of his inheritance until he reaches full age with an annual stipend of 200 marks. On this date, William requested that the lands be released to John’s mother, Elizabeth. (S) CFRs.

5/20/1403, IPM of Maud [John’s paternal grandmother] widow of Roger Clifford, knight. Northumberland: She held the manor of Hart … She died on 28 Feb. John Clifford, under age in the king’s ward, is the next heir of Roger, being the son of Thomas, knight, son of Roger, and aged 13 years and more. (S) CIsPM.

7/21/1403, Elizabeth’s father slain at the Battle of Shrewsbury.

12/18/1403, To the abbot of Shrewsbury. Order to suffer the head of Thomas Percy late earl of Worcester [Elizabeth’s granduncle], which the king has commanded to be delivered to John Clifforde esquire and Thomas de Burgh for burial with the earl's body, to be so buried in his church of St. Peter Shrewsbury. By K. (S) CCRs.

8/1403-11/1411, John married to Elizabeth.

3/4/1411, IPM of Euphemia widow of Walter de Heslarton, knight. Derby: She held the manor of Staveley … with reversion to John son and heir of Thomas de Clifford, knight, annual value 100s. She died on 24 Oct. 1393. John de Clyfford is heir, aged 21 years and more. (S) CIsPM.

6/9/1411, Proof of age of John de Clifford. Elizabeth widow of Thomas de Clifford, who has the wardship by the grant of Anne late queen of England, should be informed. Northumberland: John son and heir of Thomas de Clifford, knight, was born at Hart and baptised there on 23 April 1389, and is therefore aged 22 years and more. William Whitchestre, knight, aged 50 years, saw the baptism. Robert Lysle, knight, 60 and more: Robert his son was born within 3 days of the birth and is now aged 22 and more. … (S) CIsPM.

Aft. 9/21/1411, John’s sister Matilda became the 2nd wife of Richard of Conisburg, 3rd earl of Cambridge, and stepmother to Richard, future 3rd Duke of York [father of King Edward IV.] (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P60.

11/1411, 3 new members summoned to parliament as ‘lords temporal’: John Clifford replacing his father, Robert Wiloughby replacing his father, and Hugh Stafford who had married Elizabeth, heiress of Bartholomew Bouchier. (S) Parliament Rolls, Henry V, November 1411.

1412, John and Elizabeth received a papal indult for a portable altar. [Usually granted to a young wife when she was pregnant.]

9/21/1412, John summoned to parliament as 7th lord of Skipton, York.

3/20/1413, Henry V succeeded Henry IV as King of England.

3/22/1413, Writs issued for a parliament to meet at Westminster on Monday 15 May. Lords spiritual … Lords temporal: The earls of Devon, Arundel, Westmorland, Salisbury, and Warwick, and the earl marshal; Hugh Stafford, Edward Charlton of Powys, William Clinton, Thomas de la Warre, John Oldcastle, Henry le Scrope of Masham, William Roos of Helmsley, Henry Fitzhugh, William Ferrers of Groby, Thomas Morley, Hugh Burnell, Thomas Berkeley, John de Welles, Ralph Cromwell, Ralph baron Greystoke, Thomas Dacre of Gilsland, John Harrington, Robert Willoughby, John Lovell of Tichmarsh, Richard Grey of Codnor, Reginald Grey of Ruthin, Peter Mauley, Thomas Camoys, William la Zouche of Harringworth, Henry de Beaumont, William de Botreaux, John Latimer, Richard Strange, Robert Poynings, Gilbert Talbot, John Clifford, and John Talbot of Furnivall. [47 ‘spiritual’, 38 ‘temporal’, 73 knights, 178 burgesses.] (S) Parliament Rolls, Henry V, May 1413.

4/9/1413, Henry V crowned king of England. John attended the coronation.

5/7/1415, Licence for John, lord of Clifford, to enfeoff William de Haryngton, ‘chivaler,’ … castles and manors of Appleby and Burghan, co. Westmoreland, … (S) CPRs.

~1415, John, 7th Lord Clifford, wounded in the great tournament of Carlisle between English knights and Scottish knights. The tournament was hosted by Ralph Nevill, earl of Westmoreland. Sir John Clifford jousted with Sir William Douglas. Sir William Harrington jousted with Sir David Mynges. Sir Ralph Greystoke jousted with William Edmundson, esquire. Sir Christopher Curwen jousted with Halyburton (who as injured in the neck), and Sir John Lancaster jousted with Sir John Singeler. The English won the prize. (S) Trans. Architectural and Archaeological Soc., V4, 1896, P179.

8/13/1415, John, a captain with 29 men-at-arms and 90 archers, in King Henry V’s force of 12,000 landing at the mouth of the Seine at Harfleur. (S) Univ. of Southampton, “The Soldier in Later Medieval England”.

9/22/1415, The English capture Harfleur after a siege. [Of John’s retinue, 4 men-at-arms and 13 archers had to be sent home due to illness or injuries.]

10/25/1415, Battle of Agincourt in northern France. [Documented by 3 eye witnesses.] The English longbows gave “a terrifying hail of arrow shot.” French estimate of their own dead of 4,000 would imply a ratio of nearly 9 to 1 in favour of the English. (S) Hist. of the Battle of Agincourt, Nicolas, 1827, P88.

1416-7, “Parties to Indenture: Indentures between the king and the following for war-service, (actually for the relief of Harfleur). John Clifford.” (S) UKNA.

1417, King Henry captured Argentan.

1417-18, In a winter siege, King Henry captured Falaise.

1418, John the commander that received the surrender of Cherbourg.

9/17/1418 at the siege of Rouen, France. The K. appoints John Clifford to be bearer of the black rod of the order of the Garter at Windsor. (S) Rymer’s Foedera, V9, PP619-23.

1/19/1419, The capture of Rouen, France. A major event in the Hundred Year's War, where English forces captured the capital of Normandy.

1421, John made Knight of the Garter. (S) Lists of Knights and Ladies of the Garter.

6/10/1421, John a legatee in the will of King Henry V.

8/31/1422, King Henry V died leaving an infant son Henry VI.

3/13/1422, John died at the siege of Meaux, France.

8/31/1422, Henry VI (an infant) succeeded Henry V as King of England.

[––Elizabeth––]                                                                                                                             

5/18/1424, Commitment to Elizabeth late the wife of John late lord de Clyfford, by mainprise of William Haryngton of the county of York, knight, … of the keeping of all the castles, manors and lands late of the said John late lord de Clyfford, who held of Henry V in chief on the day of his death, and of the shrievalty of Westmoreland, late of the said John, which by the death of John and by reason of the minority of Thomas his son and heir (S) CFRs.

5/7/1426, Elizabeth married Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.

10/26/1436, Elizabeth died; buried at Staindrop, Durham.

1436-37, Westmorland, Elizabeth [Percy], wife of Ralph [Nevill], and formerly of John Clifford, kt: Yorks, Westmor, Cumb, Northumb. (S) IPM, UKNA.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P218.

Children of John and Elizabeth: [2 sons, 2 daughters]

i. Thomas Clifford, born by 1415 in England.

Thomas, 8th Lord Skipton, married Joan de Dacre, d/o Thomas Dacre & Philippe Neville.

5/22/1455, Thomas died at the 1st Battle of St. Albans fighting as a Lancastrian against the Duke of York.

Children: Baron John Clifford, 9th Lord of Skipton born 1435, nicknamed “the Butcher” for killing Edmund, age 17, 2nd s/o the Duke of York following the battle of Wakefield.

ii. Mary Clifford (950661), born bef. 1422 in England.


Earl Richard Neville & Countess Alice de Montagu

1901430. Earl Richard Neville & 1901431. Countess Alice de Montagu

1400, Richard born in England, s/o 7605706. Ralph Neville & 3802861. Joan Beaufort.

1406, Alice born in England, heir & d/o 3802862. Thomas Montague & 3802863. Eleanor Holand.

Bef. 2/1420 at Orleans, France, Richard married Alice.

2/1421, Richard a carver at the coronation feast of Queen Catherine, wife of King Henry V.

8/31/1422, Henry VI (an infant) succeeded Henry V as King of England.

4/17/1424, IPM of Lucy widow of Edmund Earl of Kent. Essex: … of the inheritance of the following kin and heirs of the late earl: … Alice now wife of Richard Nevill, chevalier , and daughter of Eleanor who was the wife of Thomas earl of Salisbury, and 4th sister; … She died on 14 April last. …, Alice 17 years and more, … (S) MMC, E-CIPM 22-328.

1424, Richard involved in the liberation of King James I of Scotland from England. [James I, then age 12, had been captured with his father by pirates off the coast of England 3/22/1406. His father soon died, leaving James as King. James accompanied Henry V on his campaigns in France. James was ransomed for £40,000.]

1/1425, Richard appointed Constable of the royal castle of Pontefract.

10/21/1425, Richard’s father, Earl of Westmoreland, died. [Richard, a younger son by his father’s 2nd marriage, was not the heir.]

1426-7, “Thomas Womewill, esquire to Sir Richard Nevill, knight, Warden of the West March: Indenture of military service: Yorks.” (S) UKNA.

1428, Alice age 22 heir to her father’s lands and titles.

5/3/1429, Richard created 5th Earl of Salisbury in right of his wife.

11/6/1429, Richard the Deputy Constable at the coronation of King Henry VI. [The Duke of Bedford was not present.]

1/3/1430, Thomas Haryngton esquire, son of William Haryngton knight, to Cuthbert abbot of Coverham and the convent … Quitclaim with warranty of the advowson of a mediety of the church of Sedbergh in Lonesdale co. York … Witnesses: Richard Neville earl of Salisbury, William lord Fitz Hugh, William Haryngton, Thomas Tunstall knights, … (S) CCRs.

12/16/1431, Richard with King Henry VI at his coronation as King of France at Notre Dame, Paris. [The only English king to be crowned king in England and France.]

2/1435, Richard resigned the Wardenship of the East March and the Captaincy of Berwick.

4/22/1435, “This indenture made betwixt Richard [Neville] Erle of Salisbury.. and Thomas Dacre, Knygth, son and heire to ye lorde Dacre …” (S) UKNA. [Thomas is Richard’s nephew.]

12/9/1435, Richard and his brother William attended parliament at Westminster. (S) CPRs, 3/11/1436.

3/10/1436, “… to Richard Nevill, earl of Salisbury and Alice his wife and her issue, …” (S) UKNA.

3/11/1436, In the parliament … the king (age 14) desired Richard, earl of Salisbury, and William, lord of Fauconberge, ‘chivaler’ to cross into France and serve him there, which agreed to do to certain conditions, and particularly to the consent of their mother Joan, countess of Westmoreland, … unlawful entries … likely to be done in their absence by Ralph, earl of Westmorland, John and Thomas his brothers, … £4000 … bond … (S) CPRs.

5/1436-11/1437, Richard with Richard, Duke of York [his brother-in-law] in France.

11/1437, Richard, named to the Privy Council, took up residence in London at ‘The Harbour’ in Dowgate. [The main home of the Nevill’s, Bisham Manor, was a days ride from London.]

1438, Richard appointed as a Knight of the Garter.

11/1440, Richard, on the death of his mother, took possession of his father’s lands in Yorkshire.

5/4/1442, King Henry VI confirmed Richard’s title of Earl for the dignity of his life.

11/7/1444, Richard and other members of a royal embassy left  for France to escort [Queen by proxy wedding] Margaret back to England.

1446, Alice an executor of the will of her kinswoman Maud Clifford, widow of Richard, Earl of Cambridge.

1447, Richard assisted in the arrest of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, at Bury St. Edmonds.

9/1449, Richard retained the services of Sir Walter Strickland and 290 men for the term of his life against all folk, saving allegiance to the King.

2/1452, Earl Richard and many other magnates assembled with Henry VI at Northampton to council the King on how to handle the Duke of York who was leading a force towards London. [Duke Richard of York, s/o Richard of Conisburgh – Earl of Cambridge (1415, beheaded as part of the ‘Southampton’ plot), s/o Edmund of Langley – 1st Duke of York, s/o King Edward III.]

1453, Warwick, Richard’s son, had his lordship of Glamorgan, Wales taken away by the king and given to the Duke of Somerset. This caused the Neville clan to side with the Yorks against the Lancasters. [As with most families, there were some members on both sides. The Duke of York’s claim to the throne was actually stronger than that of the King.]

8/1453, Younger members of Richard’s family and of the Percy family, the two most powerful families of the north, happened upon each other and a war broke out between the clans.

1454, In support of the Duke of York as protector of the Realm while King Henry was “seized with madness”, Richard brought “seven score knights and squires besides other many” to London.

1454, Sir Thomas Stanley, knight, by fine, received Harwarden, Wales from Richard Nevill, earl of Salisbury and his wife Alice. (S) A Tour of Wales, Pennant, V1, 2014, P94.

4/1/1454, The Duke of York gave Richard the Great Seal, making Richard the Chancellor of England. [The King was incapacitated.] (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P70.

4/10/1454, The Duke of York, as Protector, named Richard as Chancellor of England.

1454, “Petitioners: Mayor of Calais; … [Richard Nevill], Chancellor of England.” (S) UKNA.

By 3/1455, King Henry had recovered and Richard was removed as Chancellor. The king pardoned all who had benefited from the Duke of Somerset’s imprisonment [which included Richard.] Richard returned to his castle at Middleham.

1455, Richard of York [white rose] formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury (1901430)] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset (184678), Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham [commander], with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces. [The King’s request for support had been sent out too late. Many arrived after the battle.] The Yorkists also had advantages in cannon and archers.

5/20/1455, The forces of York arrived at Royston, Hertfordshire, where they released a letter stating that they meant no harm to the King, and had raised an army and moved south in self defense against the Duke of Somerset.

5/22/1455, Richard fought at the 1st battle of St. Albans, Hertfordshire [with his son Richard]. York and Salisbury attacked from the East with little success. Warwick led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear by breaking into the town from the side. The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford [commander of the vanguard], and many other nobles. King Henry, wounded, submitted to Yorkist control. Queen Margaret and 2-year-old son Edward went into exile. This was the opening battle of the 30-year, Lancaster-York, War of the Roses. [Abbot Whethamstead of St. Albans gave and eyewitness account of the events.]

5/23/1455, Richard with the Duke of York and Earl of Warwick escorted the captured king back to London. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P78.

7/9/1455, At parliament called by the Duke of York, again Protector, the York-aligned magnates renewed their oaths of allegiance to the king.

2/1456, Henry VI revoked the Duke of York’s appointment as Protector.

8/1456, Richard returned to Middleham castle.

2/1458, York [Lieutenant of Ireland], Richard [Salisbury] and Warwick [Captain of Calais] were commanded by King Henry to endow a chantry for the souls of those killed at the battle of St. Albans as well as compensate financially the families of Clifford, Northumberland, and Somerset.

3/24/1458, “Loveday”, the King and Queen and Yorkist leaders walked hand-in-hand through the streets of London. Richard and the Duke of Somerset walked together. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillands, 1992, P83.

11/1458, Richard’s son met with him at Middleham before returning to Calais to inform him of the Queen’s attempt on his position as Captain of Calais and on his life.

11/23/1458, soon after All-Saints day, Richard at castle Middleham met other powerful men. They agreed to support the Duke of York’s claim to the throne. (S) Journal of the Architectural, … Historical Society, 1857, P83.

5/10/1459, Richard wrote his will.

5/20/1459, To the receivers, farmers or other the occupiers for the time being of the lordships, manors, lands etc. of Richard late duke of York, Edward late earl of March, Richard late earl of Warrewyk, Richard late earl of Salisbury, Edmund late earl of Roteland, Alice late countess of Salisbury, … (S) CCRs.

6/1459, Richard summoned to a Great Council at Coventry, a Lancastrian stronghold. Instead, like other Yorkists, he did not attend and went initially to Middleham castle, Yorkshire. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillands, 1992, P85.

9/1459, The Yorkists then decided to concentrate their forces at Ludlow castle. Richard was intercepted on his way to Ludlow castle.

9/23/1459, Richard [Salisbury] fought the battle of Blore Heath in western England [Shropshire], where his opponent Lord Audley [James Touchet] was slain and two of his sons captured. Richard faced a superior force in numbers, but one which did not have the experience of his forces. Richard strategically pinned Audley’s forces on a steep brook embackment and decimated them with arrows, causing many others to flee. 2000-3000 were slain in a prolonged battle, mostly on Audley’s side.

9/24/1459, Richard, having travelled overnight to evaded other royal forces of the Queen, went to market Drayton [where he learned that his sons Thomas and John had been captured at Acton Bridge], and then and met up with York, reached Worcester, where they swore oaths to the king, but received no reply. The Yorkists, 25,000 strong, made an advance on Worcestor. They encountered a superior royalist force and withdrew to Ludford bridge near Ludlow.

10/10/1459, The royal forces appeared opposite the forces of York.

10/12/1459, King Henry sent an offer of pardon to York at Ludford, which did not include pardons for Richard and his associates. During the night, Andrew Trollope, the Yorkist vanguard commander and his forces deserted. Salisbury made his way, with his son Warwick and the Earl of March [s/o the Duke of York and future Edward IV], to Devon, then by sea, to Guernsey [a channel island] and then Calais, where Warwick was still Captain. The Duke of York made his way to Ireland with is son Rutland.

11/20/1459, Richard and his son, the Earl of Warwick, attained for high treason. [23 lords, ladies and gentlemen attained.] (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillands, 1992, P89.

1/28/1460, Lord Rivers, his wife the Duchess of Bedford, and their son Anthony Wydville were brought before Salisbury, his son Wawick, and March in Calais; having been captured in Sandwich.

6/1460, Warwick and Salisbury sent forces to capture Sandwich and establish a beachhead for an invasion.

6/26/1460, Richard recrossed the Channel back to England with Warwick and March, and landed at Sandwich with 2000 men. From there they went to Canterbury.

7/2/1460, The Salisbury-Warwick-March army reached London with a force of 40,000, of which 500 were mounted. They were welcomed by the citizens of London.

7/5/1460, Lord Fauconberg, brother of Salisbury, left London heading north with 10,000 men. Soon after Warwick and March followed, leaving Salisbury in London with 2000 men to lay siege to the Tower.

7/18/1460, Richard captured the Tower.

9/8/1460, The Duke of York returned from Ireland.

10/10/1460, During parliament, York rode into London at the head of a large retinue. York decared himself king. Ultimately, York was named successor to Henry. [The Yorkist attainders were also erased.] Warwick and Salisbury did not support York’s claim to the throne. The Queen quickly raised an army in response to her son being disinherited.

11/1460, The Queen’s army of 20,000 marched south through York ravishing the countryside.

12/9/1460, York and Salisbury rode north out of London at the head of 6000 men heading for Sandal castle near Wakefield, arriving on the 21st. There they would wait for March and reinforcements from Shrewsbury.

12/29/1460, The Lancastrians infiltrated 400 men into the ranks of the Yorkists.

12/30/1460, Richard, captured at the battle of Wakefield, his sons Thomas and Rutland killed. The Duke of York was killed, as well as his son Edmund, Earl of Rutland. About 1000 were slain, evenly split between the sides.

1/1461, Richard , 5th Earl of Salisbury, was taken to Prontefract castle where he was killed by commoners while escaping.                                                                                                                                                                                     

[––Alice––]

5/19/1462, Geoffrey Beauchamp 'yoman,' Thomas Kenegy 'stacioner,' Richard Haydyff 'draper' and Richard Wright 'goldsmyth,' all of London, to Alice countess of Salisbury. Recognisance for £100, to be levied etc. in the city of London. … (S) CCRs.

5/31/1462, William Plompton of Plompton and George Darell of Sesay, both co. York knights, to Alice countess of Salisbury, late the wife of Richard earl of Salisbury. Bond in £1000 payable at Easter day next. (S) CCRs.

1462, Alice died; buried with Richard at Bisham Priory, Berkshire.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P579. (S) Dictionary of Battles, Eggenberger, 1967. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Richard and Alice: [6 sons, 6 daughters]

i. Cecily Neville, born 1424 in England. [Eldest daughter.]

1434, Cecily married Henry de Beauhamp, s/o 369358. Earl Richard Beauchamp & 369359. Elizabeth Berkeley.

7/28/1450, Cecily died.

ii. Earl Richard Neville, born 11/22/1428 in England.

1435, Richard, age 6, betrothed to Lady Anne Beauchamp, daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, & Isabel Despenser.

1449, Richard made 16th Earl of Warwick and named the Constable of Calais.

5/22/1455, Richard fought with his father at the 1st battle of St. Albans. Richard led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear.

11/20/1459, Warwick and his father attained.

12/30/1460, Richard’s father captured at the battle of Wakefield, and killed soon after. [The Duke of York was also killed.] Richard became 6th Earl of Salisbury, and the richest magnate in the history of England, owning twice what any other had possessed. March became the 4th Duke of York.

3/29/1461, The Earl of March and Warwick’s forces, with a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage, began the battle of Towton, Yorkshire. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil. As many as 28,000 died at the battle, 8000 Yorkists.

4/14/1471, Richard, Earl of Warwick, “the King maker”, age 42, head of the Lancastrian army, killed at the battle of Barnet against royalist forces of Edward IV. A heavy fog limited visibility. A combined total of 1000 knights died. Both handguns [relatively new] and cannon were used during the fight.

iii. Alice Neville (950715), born ~1430 in England.


Earl Richard Neville, “the Kingmaker”

1901430ii. Earl Richard Neville, “the Kingmaker”

11/22/1428, Richard born in England, s/o 1901430. Earl Richard Neville & 1901431. Alice de Montagu.

1434, Richard bethrothed to Anne Beauchamp, d/o 369358. Richard Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick & [2nd wife] Isabel le Despenser.

6/11/1446, Richard’s brother-in-law, Henry, 1st Duke of Warwick, died, leaving as his heir his 2-year-old daughter Anne. [Henry married to Richard’s sister Cecily, Richard married to Henry’s sister Anne.]

5/22/1455, Richard fought with his father at the 1st battle of St. Albans. Richard led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear.

1/3/1449, Richard’s neice Anne, a minor, heir to the Duke of Warwick, died.

Anne, Richard’s wife, named as heir to her brother Henry. [Her 3 half-sisters protested to no avail, Anne was the rightful heir due to her being the only full sibiling.] Richard now owned land in 18 counties and over 20 castles; with his seat at Warwick castle, a massive fortress. The greatest concentration of his lands were in the western midlands and south Wales. An import lordship was that of Glamorgan, Wales.

1449, Richard made 16th Earl of Warwick and named the Constable of Calais.

1453, A dispute began between Earl Richard and the Duke of Somerset over ownership of Glamorgan in Wales, which the king had just granted to Somerset. This caused the Neville clan to side with the Yorks against the Lancasters. [As with most families, there were some members on both sides.]

8/1453, Members of Richard’s family and of the Percy family, the two most powerful families of the north, happened upon each other and a war broke out between the clans.

1454, The Duke of York named protector of the Realm while King Henry was “seized with madness”.

By 3/1455, King Henry had recovered and Salisbury [Richard’s father] was removed as Chancellor.

1455, Richard of York [white rose] formed an army of 3000 in the north, Richard [Salisbury] an army of 2000, and his son – Richard [Warwick] an army of 2000, and marched towards London. Lancastrians [red rose], King Henry VI, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, with a smaller force of 2000-3000 left London to intercept Yorkist forces.

5/20/1455, The forces of York arrived at Royston, Hertfordshire, where they released a letter stating that they meant no harm to the King, and had raised an army and moved south in self defense against the Duke of Somerset.

5/22/1455, Richard fought at the 1st battle of St. Albans [with his father Richard], and became very powerful after the victory. The Yorkists initiated an assault. Richard led mounted knights in an attack on the Lancastrian rear. The royalist lost 300 including Somerset and Thomas de Clifford, and many other nobles. This was the opening battle of the 30-year, Lancaster-York, War of the Roses. King Henry submitted to Yorkist control.

4/20/1456, King Henry appointed Richard the Captain of Calais, the highest military appointment due to its strategic location.

8/1456, After helping suppress a Scottish invasion, Richard went to Calais.

1457, Richard used his 10-ship fleet to suppress piracy in the channel and to defeat a Spanish fleet. [During this time Richard also built a “lavish” home in London where he was gaining popularity.]

2/1458, York [Lieutenant of Ireland], Richard [Salisbury] and Warwick [Captain of Calais] were commanded by King Henry to endow a chantry for the souls of those killed at the battle of St. Albans. Warwick also paid the Clifford family 1000 marks.

3/24/1458, “Loveday”, the King and Queen and Yorkist leaders walked hand-in-hand through the streets of London.

1458, Richard began negotiations with Philip, Duke of Burgundy.

Warwick was called to London by the Queen to respond to accusations of piracy against the Germans. Richard arrived with 600 armed soldiers.

7/31/1458, A formal inquiry into Richard’s actions was started by the Council. [The next day Londoners rioted against the Queen, and in support of Richard.]

Fall/1458, Richard was in London when a possible attempt on his life was made [it may have been an accident.] Richard was accused by the Queen of starting the incident and ordered his arrest. Richard escaped back to Calais.

11/1458, The Queen attempted to revoke Richard’s appointment at Calais. Richard returned to London and defended his appointment on the grounds that only the Parliament could revoke his assignment. On leaving the council, Richard was attacked by men of Somerset and Wiltshire, but again escaped.

9/21/1459, Warwick, with 200 men-at-arms and 400 archers – mostly professional soldiers, entered London in support of his father and the Duke of York. From there, with a larger army, Richard headed for Warwick castle to rendezvous with his father. The Queen’s forces were already at Warwick castle, and Richard turned to head for Ludlow and meet up with York.

9/1459, Warwick met his father and York at Ludlow castle.

The Yorkists, 25,000 strong, made an advance on Worcestor. They encountered a superior royalist force and withdrew to Ludford bridge near Ludlow. King Henry sent an offer of pardon to York at Ludford, which did not include pardons for Salisbury and his associates.

10/10/1459, The royal forces appeared opposite the forces of York.

10/12/1459, During the night, Andrew Trollope, the Yorkist vanguard commander and his forces deserted. Salisbury made his way, with Warwick and the Earl of March [s/o the Duke of York and future Edward IV], to Devon, then by sea, to Guernsey [a channel island] and Calais, where Richard was still Captain. The Duke of York made his way to Ireland.

11/20/1459, Warwick and his father attained.

In response to an attack by the Duke of Somerset, Richard attacked Sandwich. Then Somerset, with 1000 men under Trollope attacked and captured Guisnes castle. Richard, in return, captured Somerset’s commanders Lord Audley and Humphrey Stafford.

1/28/1460, Lord Rivers, his wife the Duchess of Bedford, and their son Anthony Wydville were brought before Salisbury, his son Wawick, and March in Calais; having been captured in Sandwich.

3/1460, Richard traveled to Waterford, Ireland to meet with the Duke of York where they planned a two-pronged invasion.

6/1/1460, Richard arrived back in Calais by sea.

6/1460, Warwick and Salisbury sent forces to capture Sandwich and establish a beachhead for an invasion.

6/26/1460, Warwick recrossed the Channel back to England with his father and Marche, and landed at Sandwich with 2000 men. From there they went to Canterbury.

7/2/1460, The Salisbury-Warwick-March army reached London with a force of 40,000, of which 500 were mounted.

7/5/1460, Lord Fauconberg, brother of Salisbury, left London heading north with 10,000 men. Soon after Warwick and March followed, leaving Salisbury in London with 2000 men.

7/10/1460, Richard attacked the royalist forces at Northhampton. Lord Grey of Ruthin [later Earl of Kent], commanding a Lancastrian force, turned sides and helped the Yorkists. The Duke of Buckingham and many Lancastrian nobles died. King Henry was taken to London under Yorkist control. The Queen fled Coventry for Scotland.

10/28/1460, Henry named as his successor Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, who had returned from exile in Ireland. [The Yorkist attainders were also erased.]

12/9/1460, Warwick remained in charge in London while his father and York left northward to meet the advancing army of the Queen.

12/30/1460, Richard’s father captured [and later killed] at the battle of Wakefield. [The Duke of York was also killed.] Richard became 6th Earl of Salisbury, and the richest magnate in the history of England, owning twice what any other had possessed. March became the 4th Duke of York.

2/2/1461, March defeated Lancastrian forces at the battle of Mortimore’s Cross. Owen Tudor, Henry VI’s stepfather, was captured and executed.

2/17/1461, The forces of Queen Margaret made a surprise attack on Richard’s forces at the 2nd battle of St. Albans. In a snow storm, half the Yorkist forces were killed. Richard, and John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, escaped. King Henry VI was left sitting under a tree for the Lancastrian forces.

2/27/1461, Edward of York, s/o the slain Duke, joined with Richard’s remaining forces of about 4000, returned to London.

3/14/1461, Edward [earl of March] proclaimed himself King Edward IV as the rightful heir.

3/28/1461, Richard defeated by a Lancastrian army commanded by Lord Clifford at the battle of Ferrybridge. Richard was wounded in the leg. Afterwards, Warwick killed his horse in full view of his soldiers, saying he would rather die on foot with his men than give another inch. With Edward’s support the tide turned and Lord Clifford was killed [Clifford had murdered Edward’s younger brother.]

3/29/1461, March and Warwick’s forces, with a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage, began the battle of Towton, Yorkshire. In 10 hours thousands fell to the sword, lance, and spear. Both March and Warwick were involved in hand-to-hand combat. About dusk, Yorkist reinforcements, fresh to battle, arrived, sent by the earl of Norfolk. The arrival sent the tired Lancaster forces fleeing. In the aftermath, the bridge over the river collapsed killing many from both sides. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil. As many as 28,000 died at the battle, 8000 Yorkists. [Another estimated 12,000 Lancastrians died in the aftermath of the main battle.]

King Henry, Queen Margaret, and Prince Edward fled to Scotland.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

7/1461, Richard suppressed a Lancastrian incursion in Northumberland, capturing the castles of Alnwick and Bamburgh.

5/1462, Warwick seized a castle in Scotland. [Queen Margaret were now in France.]

10/1462, Queen Margaret landed at Bamburgh with a small invasion force, retaking its castle as well as Alnwick. The Queen then traveled north to Berwick to meet up with King Henry and the Lancastrian supporters.

11/1462, The Lancastrians in retreat, Warwick captured Warkworth castle to use as a base or operations in the north.

By 1/6/1463, Richard had captured Alnwick and Dunstanburgh. [These were soon back in Lancastrian hands due to their governors switching sides.]

7/1463, Queen Margaret returned to France to seek support from the Duke of Burgundy.

6/23/1464, Warwick again appeared before Alnwick castle demanding its surrender. Warwick proceeded to take Dunstanburgh and Norham.

9/4/1464 at Reading, with Warwick putting pressure on Edward IV to conclude a marriage alliance with France, Edward announced that he was already secretly married to Elizabeth Wydville – a marriage disliked by most nobility.

Warwick wrote a letter to King Louis XI telling him that he and the King were not on good terms.

7/13/1465, King Henry VI was captured. He was then taken to Islington to Warwick, who took him to the Tower.

1/1466, Warwick was in disagreement with Edward IV over foreign alliances. Warwick wanted an alliance with France, Edward with Burgundy.

4/14/1466, Richard sent to Burgundy to investigate a potential marriage of King Edward’s sister Margaret. While in France, Warwick met with King Louis XI at Calais and signed a 2-year truce.

1466, Edward IV replaced Warwick’s uncle as Treasure of England with his stepfather, Earl Rivers.

1467, Warwick proposed his daughters as brides of Edward IV,s brothers. [King Edward refused.]

1469, Warwick and King Louis XI had a secret agreement that Warwick would be given Holland and Zeeland if he could overthrow Edward IV.

1469, Warwick and his family returned to Calais.

6/28/1469, Warwick, back in England, raised an army to march against northern rebels.

7/4/1469, Warwick, with a papal approval for his daughter to marry Clarence, brother of the King, returned to Calais.

7/16/1469, Warwick returned to England, going 1st to Canterbury.

7/26/1469, Warwick’s forces, meeting up with those of Sir John Conyers, defeated the forces of Pembroke at the battle of Edgecote. The earl of Pembroke was captured and executed. The earl of Devon fled but was later captured and executed. Soon after, King Edward was captured at Olney.

8/12/1469, Warwick executed captured Sir John Wydville and Earl Rivers [brother and father of the Queen.]

10/1469, Warwick released Edward IV from captivity.

3/8/1470, Both Warwick and Clarence were given commissions of array to raise armies to suppress a revolt [which they had secretly instigated.]

3/12/1470, King Edward defeated Sir Robert Welles at the battle of Empingham and captured documents showing Warwick and Clarence were behind the uprising.

3/25/1470, Edward removed Warwick’s brother as earl of Northumberland; offering a Marquess title [with no land] and the marriage of his eldest daughter to John’s son [George Neville] in replacement.

4/3/1470, Warwick and Clarence put to sea from Exeter [having had most of their ships captured at Southampton.]

5/1/1470, Warwick landed at Honfleur and was greeted by the royal Admiral of King Louis XI.

6/8/1470, King Louis began negotiations between Warwick and Queen Margaret at Amboise on the Loire. Louis would support Warwick if they restored Henry VI and pledged support of England against Burgundy.

7/15/1470, at Angers, France, Warwick met with Queen Margaret, offered apologies, and was pardoned. It was agreed that Prince Henry would marry Warwick’s daughter Anne.

9/9/1470, Warwick with a fleet of 60 ships sailed from La Hogue, Normandy for England. [A storm had scattered the Burgundian fleet guarding the coast of France, and the English fleet guarding the channel.]

9/13/1470 Warwick’s invasion force landed at Plmounth on the west part of the southern coast. [Soon afterwards Warwick’s brother, John, Marquess of Montague, changed sides back in support of Warwick.] King Edward IV, realizing his position, headed for Norfolk, from which he sailed for Holland [Burgundian territory.]

10/6/1470, Warwick’s forces entered London unopposed [and by messenger had already released Henry VI from prison.]

10/13/1470, Henry VI restored to the throne, Warwick carrying the king’s train in the procession.

3/14/1471, Edward IV landed his forces at Ravenspur, where he burned his ship to indicate he did not plan to retreat.

3/23/1471, Warwick forced Clarence to deliver some of his property to Queen Margaret and Prince Edward.

3/29/1471, Edward IV and his army arrived at Coventry where Warwick had his forces.

4/3/1471, Some of Edward’s forces intercepted the earl of Oxford at Leicester and defeated him. Clarence decided to return support to his brother Edward IV, and arrived at Coventry with 12,000 men. Not able to lure Warwick out of Coventry, Edward decided to take London. [Warwick followed 2 days later.]

4/11/1471, Edward IV entered London and took King Henry prisoner.

4/13/1471, Edward moved north out of London. His advanced forces skirmished with Warwick’s advanced forces at Barnet, 10 miles north of London. Arriving at night, the two main forces unknowingly camped next to each other.

4/14/1471, Richard, Earl of Warwick, “the King maker”, age 42, now head of the Lancastrian army, killed at the battle of Barnet against royalist forces of Edward IV. A heavy fog limited visibility. A combined total of 1000 knights died. Both handguns [relatively new] and cannon were used during the fight.

Richard buried at Bisham, Berkshire.

(S) Warwick the King-maker, Philippe de Comines, 2005. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of Richard and Anne:

i. Isabel, born 9/5/1451 at Warwick castle, England.
7/11/1469 in Calais, Isabel married George, Duke of Clarence, brother of King Edward IV.
12/22/1476, Isabel died.

ii. Queen Anne, born 6/11/1456 at Warwick castle, England.
7/25/1470, Anne betrothed to Prince Edward, s/o King Henry VI, in Angers Cathedral, France. [Both great-grandchildren of John of Gaunt – a dispensation would be required to consummate the marriage.]
12/13/1470 in France, Edward and Anne married by the Grand Vicar of Bayeux.
5/4/1471, Edward killed at the battle of Tewkesbury.
7/12/1472, Anne married 2nd, Richard [later King Richard III], Duke of Gloucester, brother of King Edward IV.
3/1485, Anne died.

Friday, November 26, 2010

Duke John Howard & Katherine de Moleyns

184692. Duke John Howard & 184693. Katherine de Moleyns  

1420, John born in England, s/o 369384. Robert Howard & 369385. Margaret Mowbray.

~1420, Katherine born in England, d/o 369386. Sir William Moleyns & 369387. Margery ?.

Bef. 4/14/1436, John’s father died.

1440, John 1st married Catherine.

1451, John accompanied Lord L’isle to Guienne, France.

7/17/1453, John at the battle of Chatillon, France, in service to John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk. The French imployed a new “rock launcher” and decisively defeated the English, ending the 100 years war. John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, died in the battle.

1455, John elected Knight of the Shire for Norfolk.

3/16/1461, Sir John Howard met up with Edward [IV] at Cambridge, arriving from the abbey of Bury St Edmunds where he had received £100 in support of Edward.

3/29/1461, John, a Yorkist, knighted at the battle of Towton by Edward [IV], a Yorkist victory. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil. As many as 28,000 died at the battle between Towton and Saxton in Yorkshire. Yorkist forces, with a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage. [King Henry and Queen Margaret fled to Scotland.]

6/28/1461, Edward IV, age 19, crowned King of England.

1461, John appointed Constable of Colchester Castle, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk; and one of the King’s Carvers. John was also appointed to the King’s council, a small select group of advisors.

8/1461, John involved in a brawl with John Paston, and used his influence with Edward IV against Paston.

11/1461, John imprisoned after giving offence at the election of Paston.

1462, John appointed Constable of Norwich Castle and received grants of several manors forfeited by the Earl of Wiltshire. He was joined by William Neville, Baron Fauconberg and Lord Clinton to “keep the seas”, taking Croquet and the Isle of Rhe.

1464, John helped Norfolk (John Mowbray) secure Wales for Edward IV; bought the reversion of Bamburgh Castle; and was with Edward IV and his court at Reading.

11/3/1465, Catherine died at Stoke Nayland, Suffolk.

[––John––]

1466, John appointed Vice Admiral for Norfolk and Suffolk; and was in Calais part of the year.

Bef. 1/22/1467, John married 2nd Margaret, d/o Sir John Chedworth, widow.

4/1467, John elected Knight of the Shire for Suffolk.

11/1467, John appointed Envoy to France; and Treasurer to the Household [held until 1474.]

6/1468, John attended Margaret of York to Flanders for her marriage to Charles, Duke of Burgundy.

7/26/1469, Edward IV’s army was defeated at the battle of Edgecote Moor by the the earl of Warwick, who had put Edward on the throne, but was in rebellion.

10/1469, John with other magnates who supported Edward IV were secretly summoned to join him at York. From York over 1000 mounted men followed the King to London.

3/1470, John Howard and Lord Rivers took forces to Southampton and captured all the vessels of Warwick in the port including the Trinity.

10/15/1470, John created Baron de Howard by writ of summons.

10/30/1470, King Henry VI restored to the throne by the forces of Warwick. John took refuge at Colchester.

3/1471, John supported Edward IV’s return from exile to become King.

4/1471, John emerged from Colchester to join the forces of Edward IV moving on London.

4/11/1470, John with the forces of King Edward IV entered London where the Archbishop of Cantebury deposed King Henry VI.

4/14/1471, John badly wounded at the battle of Barnet. North of London, Kind Edward IV defeated and killed Richard Neville, earl of Warwick, “the Kingmaker.” A heavy fog limited visibility. A combined total of 1000 knights died. Both handguns [relatively new] and cannon were used during the fight.

5/4/1471, Edward IV defeated the forces of Henry VI at the battle of Tewkesbury to regain the throne of England. [Edward, Prince of Wales, age 18, was killed in the assault. The only heir-apparent of England to die in battle.]

6/1471, John appointed Deputy Governor of Calais.

7/1474, John with Edward IV in his invasion of France. After the truce of Amiens, John received a pension from Louis XI and remained in France, briefly, as a hostage. On his return to England, John was granted manors in Suffolk and Oxfordshire forfeited by John de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

4/26/1477, Thomas Falstolf esquire, … of Nacton co. Suffolk, …, to John lord Howard, Thomas Howard esquire, … Release and quitclaim of all his rights in the manor of Oulton … (S) CCRs.

1477-79, John sent to France on multiple trips.

11/19/1479, John Howard granted a market and fair at Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk. (S) Gazetteer of Markets and Fairs to 1516.

1481, John coheir to his cousin Anne Mowbray; heiress & d/o John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.

1482, John as Lord Howard was a member of the “old nobility” which opposed the Woodvilles and the Queen. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P177.

11/15/1482, John summoned to parliament.

4/19/1483, John carried the king’s banner at the funeral of Edward IV, pledging allegiance to Richard III. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P179.

5/13/1483, John appointed High Steward of the Duchy of Lancaster and a Privy Councillor. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P185.

6/28/1483, John created Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshall of England. [Anne Mowbray, only d/o John, Duke of Norfolk, died before consummation of her marriage to the Duke of York. The title went to her closet relative, John Howard.]

7/6/1483, Richard III crowned King of England. John acted as High Steward, bore the crown, and as Earl Marshall was the King’s Champion.

1483, John persuaded Elizabeth Wydville [Woodville] to let the young Duke of York join his brother Edward V in the Tower.

By 9/1483, Edward V and his younger brother were “put to silence in the Tower of London.” (S) Entry by Robert Ricart, Recorder of Bristol. [John was possibly involved in the murder of the two princes.]

9/12/1484 at Nottingham, John appointed Chief of Commissioners to negotiate with James III of Scotland.

8/22/1485, John commanded the vanguard in the battle of Bosworth in Leicestershire; killed in the battle; buried in the conventual church at Thetford, Norfolk. In the battle, Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, after invading southwest Wales, raised an army of 5,000. John, in the forces of Richard III, was also allied with the Duke of Norfolk and the Earl of Northumberland and an army of 10,000. Thomas Lord Stanley and his brother William commanded 6,000 reserves. The Stanley’s turned to support Henry. Northumberland did not engage other forces. The Yorkist were overwhelmed. Richard III and the Duke of Norfolk were killed. Richard’s royal crown was placed on Henry’s head. This battle ended the 30-year War of the Roses.

[––Margaret––]

1494, Margaret died; buried at Stoke Nayland.

(S) Magna Carta Ancestry, P438. (S) The History and Antiquities of Boston, Thompson, P373. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995.

Children of John and Catherine:

i. Thomas Howard (92346), born 1443 in England.

ii. Anne Howard, born ? in England.

Anne married Edmund Georges.

iii. Isabel Howard, born ? in England.

Isabel married Sir Robert Mortimer.

iv. Jane Howard, born ? in England.

Jane married Sir John Timperley.

v. Margaret Howard, born ? in England.

Margaret married Sir John Wyndham.

Children of John and Margaret:

ii. Katherine Howard, born ? in England.

Katherine married Sir John Bouchier, 2nd Lord Bouchier, stepson of her brother Thomas.

Children: Jane Bouchier, born ? in England. She married Sir Edmund Knyvet, gs/o Katherine’s half-brother Thomas.


Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Duke Thomas Howard & Countess Elizabeth Tilney & Sir Humphrey Bourchier

92346. Duke Thomas Howard & 92347. Countess Elizabeth Tilney & 475358. Sir Humphrey Bourchier

~1440, Humphrey Bourgchier born in England, s/o 950716. Lord John Bourchier & 950717. Marjorie Berners.

1442, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 184694. Sir Frederick Tilney & 184695. Elizabeth Cheney.

1443, Thomas born in Stoke Neyland, Suffolk, England, s/o 184692. John Howard & 184693. Catherine de Moleyns.

2/21/1447, John Say given wardship and marriage of his step-daughter Elizabeth.

[––Elizabeth & Humphrey––]

4/11/1451, “Indenture, marriage settlement. 1) John Bourgchier, kt. 2) John Say esqs. Laurence Cheyne esqs. Humfrey, s. of (1) to espouse Eliz., d. of Frederyk Tylney, esq., "that is to God passed", she being ward of J.S., before next All Saints. … If Humfrey die before Eliz. 14 yrs., she is to marry next son, or in default to be returned unmarried with any property. …” (S) UKNA.

8/1453, King Henry VI had a mental breakdown. [Richard, Duke of York, appointed Protector of the Realm. This event soon led to the War of the Roses.]

1460, Schedule of recognizances made by John Neville, of Middleham, knight, and his mainpernors ...; Margaret of Anjou, Queen of England; ...; Humphrey Bourghchier of Cheshunt [Hertfordshire], esquire; ...; Richard Fenys of Herstmonceux, knight; ... (S) UKNA.

7/10/1460, Battle of Northampton, a Yorkist victory. [King Henry VI captured.]

10/19/1460, Grant by Alice Blogwyn, ..., to Humphrey Bourgchier, William Husee, ..., esquires, ..., of all the lands, etc. in Upton [Northamptonshire.] (S) UKNA.

2/12/1461, Humphrey left London with the Earl of Warwick and 8000 men and the king as Warwick’s prisoner.

2/17/1461, Humphrey at the 2nd battle of St. Albans, Hertfordshire. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Neillads, 1993, P102.

2/17/1461, 2nd battle of St. Albans, Hertfordshire – a Lancastrian victory. King Henry VI was rescued at the battle. The Earl of Warwick led the Yorkists who reached St. Albans first and fortified the city, but spread his forces too thin. In an unusual maneuver the Lancastrians flanked the Yorkist forces giving them superior numbers against the defenders in the early parts of the battle. The battle lasted most of the day as the Lancastrians advanced through the town. Warwick withdrew with a force of about 4000 and nightfall.

3/29/1461, The battle of Towton in Yorkshire, a Yorkist victory. This battle was the largest and bloodiest fought on British soil. As many as 28,000 died at the battle between Towton and Saxton in Yorkshire. Yorkist forces, with a wind at their back in a blinding snow storm giving their archers and spearmen a significant advantage. [King Henry and Queen Margaret fled to Scotland. King Henry had another breakdown, and Queen Margaret led the Lancastrian resistance.]

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

Aft. 1466, Elizabeth the Lady of the Bedchamber of the Queen’s daughter, Princess Elizabeth.

10/1470, Thomas, Treasurer of the household of Edward IV, fled to Colchester when Henry VI was briefly restored to the throne. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P376.

10/2/1470, Will of Dame Jane Neville, widow ... to my brother Sir Humphrey Bourgchier, Kt., a ring of gold with a floure de lis of rubies. ... (S) Warwick Castles and its Earls, 1903, P833.

10/3/1470, Henry VI regained the throne of England.

10/16/1470, Lady Margerie Berners proved the will of her daughter Jane.

4/14/1471, Humphrey Bourchier, a Yorkist, slain at Barnet Field, a battle lasting about 3 hours, in which about 1500 were killed. Humphrey buried at Wesminster Abbey.  Thomas Howard was “sore hurt” fighting on the Yorkist side for Edward IV. (S) The Wars of the Roses, Weir, 1995, P398. [Humphrey buried in the Chapel of St. Edmund, Westminster Abbey, dying before his father.]

[––Elizabeth––]

5/11/1471, Edward IV regained the crown after the Battle of Tewkesbury. [King Henry’s son and heir was killed.]

1471, Thomas went to France in support of Charles, Duke of Burgundy. [Thomas returned to England in 1472.]

2/28/1472, Elizabeth wrote a will: “I Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Frederick Tilney, son and heir of Philip Tylney, sometime Canon and Residentiary of Lincoln, late wife of Humphrey Bourgchier, Knt. son and heir of John Bourgchier, Lord Berners, Knight, in pure widowhood ... All my manors ... Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Lincoln, York and Stafford, to my use to perform my will. ... reversion of the feoffs ... to Margaret and Anne, my daughters, £100 each.” (S) Testamenta Vetusta, Nicolas, 1826, P483. [Since son John is not mentioned, she must have been pregnant – which would justify writing her will.]

4/1472, Thomas, Esquire of the Body of Edward IV.

4/1472, Elizabeth, joint godmother to Princess Margaret Tudor. [Died an infant.]

[––Elizabeth & Thomas––]

4/30/1472, Thomas married Elizabeth.

5/8/1472, Elizabeth wrote another will: “Dame Elizabeth Howard, daughter and heir of Frederick Tilney, and now wife of Thomas Howard, son and heir of John, Lord Howard, … I will that John Bourghchier, my son, die without issue during my and my husband’s life, then Margaret and Anne to have none of the £100 given in my other will”. [There is a 3rd will of 1506 attributed to her, but this was actually the will of Elizabeth Talbot, widow of Duke of Norfolk.]

6/1475, Thomas led 6 men-at-arms and 200 archers to join the king's army in France.

1476, Thomas made Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

4/26/1477, Thomas Falstolf esquire, … of Nacton co. Suffolk, …, to John lord Howard, Thomas Howard esquire, … Release and quitclaim of all his rights in the manor of Oulton … (S) CCRs.

1/18/1478, Thomas knighted by King Edward IV at the marriage of the king’s son, the Duke of York to Lady Anne Mowbray.

5/13/1481, Thomas Howard, sheriff of Norfolk. (S) CCRs.

1/20/1483, Thomas Howard and William Knyvet represented Norfolk at parliament. (S) Parliament Rolls, 2005.

4/9/1483, King Edward IV died; succeded by his 12 year old son Edward V.

5/24/1483, Henry Chycheley the younger, to … Thomas Howard knight, … Release and quitclaim … of a manor called 'Codenham halle' [Suffolk] … (S) CCRs.

By 6/1483, Edward V and his younger brother were “put to silence in the Tower of London.” (S) Entry by Robert Ricart, Recorder of Bristol.

7/6/1483, Richard III [brother of Edward IV] became King of England, deposing Edward V. Thomas carried the Sword of State at the coronation.

1483, Thomas created Earl of Surrey, invested as a Knight of the Garter, and appointed Lord Steward of the Household.

8/22/1485, Thomas fought [with his father] on the losing side at Bosworth against Henry VII. [His father was killed, he was take prisoner, attained, and taken to the Tower in London.]

10/30/1485, King Henry VII crowned King of England.

12/6/1485, Giovanni de Giglis, Collector of Peter's Pence in England, to Pope Innocent VIII. …  ‘The Earl of Northumberland (Henry Percy), who was captured and imprisoned, has been set at liberty, but on security … The Earl of Surrey (Thomas Howard), is still under arrest, but De Giglis hears he will be released. (S) Cal. of State Papers of Venice, V1, 1864.

6/1487, Thomas refused a chance to escape from the Tower, which was noted by King Henry VII.

1/1488, Thomas released from the Tower when he agreed to command against the Scots. He was restored as Earl of Surrey.

5/1488, Thomas was sent to put down a taxation rebellion in Yorkshire. [They had slain Henry Percy, earl of Northumberland – Thomas had the leader executed.]

11/1489, Elizabeth, joint godmother to Princess Margaret Tudor.

1490, Thomas’ Knight of the Garter status restored.

1492, Thomas suppressed a rebellion at Acworth in Wales.

10/1495 at Parliament at Westminster. … by an indenture made with the assent of our sovereign lord the king, between the excellent princess Elizabeth, queen of England and France, and Thomas, earl of Surrey, that a marriage be made and solemnised between Thomas, Lord Howard, son and heir apparent of the said earl, and Anne, sister of the said queen, which marriage is now made and solemnised; and that the said earl, … should have for term of his life £120 yearly … with a proviso … that if Elizabeth, now duchess of Norfolk, or the said Anne, now wife to the same Thomas, Lord Howard, dies, that thenceforth the said annuity should cease. (S) Parliament Rolls, 2005.

4/4/1497, Elizabeth died; buried at the Minoresses Convent, Aldgate, London.

[––Thomas––]

1497, Thomas invaded Scotland after James IV had laid siege to Norham castle. Thomas challenged the Scot king to battle, but eventually had to retreat due to weather.

6/25/1501, Thomas confirmed as Lord Treasurer and made a member of the Privy Council.

1501, Thomas sent to arrange the marriage terms of Henry VII’s daughter Margaret to James IV of Scotland.

Thomas married 2nd Agnes Tilney, cousin of Elizabeth, gd/o Hugh Tilney of Boston, brother of Elizabeth’s father Frederick.

1503, Thomas escorted Princess Margaret to Edinburgh, Scotland.

10/1508, Thomas sent to Antwerp to negotiate the marriage of Henry VII’s daughter Mary with the Prince of Castile.

3/1509, Thomas on a commission to conclude a treaty with France.

4/1509, Thomas an executor of King Henry VII’s will.

6/24/1509, Henry VIII crowned King of England.

7/10/1510, Grant. Thomas Howard earl of Surrey, Treasurer of England. To be, for life, Earl Marshal of England, …, and bear a golden staff (described); also grant of £20 a year from the Hanape … by the King's special command. (S) L&Ps, F&D, Henry VIII, V1, 1920.

7/3/1511 at Valladolid, Aragon. Treaty made by Lewis Carroz, commissioner for Ferdinand king of Aragon, and Johanna queen of Castile, Thomas [Howard] Earl of Surrey, treasurer and marshal of England, and George [Talbot] Earl of Shrewsbury, steward to the Household, on part of Hen. VIII. … The two kings to attack France in Acquitaine … Both kings to keep the sea from "le Trade" to the mouth of the Thames. … All lands in Acquitaine to be delivered to the King of England. … [Signed by King Henry on 11/17/1511.]

9/1512, Thomas, at odds with [future Cardinal] Thomas Wosley, left the Court of Henry VIII.

9/9/1513, Henry VIII went to France about his claim to the French throne. While he was gone King James of Scotland invaded with 30,000 men. At the battle of Flodden Field, Northumberland, English longbow versus Scottish spear, Thomas, as Lieutenant General of the North, repulsed the attack with 20,000, killing over 10,000 Scots and the king. [The last great battle won by the longbow.]

2/1/1514, Thomas, 70 years old, reacquired his father’s title of Duke of Norfolk, and restored as Earl Marshall.

11/16/1515, Thomas one of the escorts of Thomas Wosley as he was inducted as a Cardinal at Westminster.

2/1516, Elizabeth was godmother to Princess Mary [future Queen “Bloody Mary”.]

5/1517, Thomas suppressed a riot in London known as “Evil May Day”.

1520-21, Thomas served as Guardian of the Realm while King Henry returned to France.

5/2/1521, Surrender by Thomas Howard, knt., Earl of Surrey, to Hen. VIII., of the manor of Evyndon, which the King by letters patent dated at Westminster, 22 Nov., 2 Henry VIII., granted to the Earl's late wife Anne, one of the daughters of Edward IV., and her children; on account of the decease of whom and of her issue the said manor has descended to the Earl for his life with reversion to the King.

5/1521, While acting as Lord High Steward, Thomas was compelled to put his friend Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham, to death on charges of treason.

5/1522, Thomas sent as an ambassador to Holy Roman Emperor, Carlos V.

4/1523, Thomas attended parliament [but he had resigned as Treasurer.]

5/21/1524, Thomas died at Castle Framlingham, Norfolk.

6/26/1524, Thomas buried at Thetford Priory, Norfolk.

(S) Fifty Ancestors of Henry Lincoln Clapp, 1902, P73. (S) UKNA, East Susses Record Office, DAN. (S) The Hist. of Long Melford, Parker, 1873, P68. (S) Visitation of Norfolk.

Family notes:

·          (S) Westminster Abbey inscription [Latin] for Sir Humphrey Bourchier: “Behold lying here the warrior at Barnet, ... Humphrey Bourgchier, sprung from the glorious line of King Edward, called the Third, the son and heir of John, Lord Berners. And lo, Edward the Fourth has the triumph in the battle, in which Humphrey dies a true servant of the king. He was an attendant at the table of the king's wife Elizabeth; ...". [The coats of arms include those of Bourgchier, Louvain, Berners, Tilney and Thorpe.]

·         Humphrey Bourgchier, knight, Lord Cromewell [1456–59, Chamberlain to the King], and his wife Johanna, heiress & d/o Ralph Cromwell, a cousin of this Humphrey, buried in the same chapel, who also died at the Battle of Barnet [no heirs.]

Children of Humphrey and Elizabeth:

i. Anne Bouchier (237679), born 1470 in England.

ii. Sir John Bouchier, born 1472 in England.

6/27/1476, Grant to the king’s kinsman Thomas, cardinal archbishop of Canterbury, and Thomas Bourgchier, esquire [uncle of John] of the custody of all manors ... late of John Bourgchier of Berners, knight, and Majory his wife, ... and marriage of John son and heir of Humphrey Bourgchier, knight, their [grand]son and heir ... (S) CPRs.

John married Katherine Howard, half-sister of Thomas, his step-father.

6/1520, John attended the famous “Field of Cloth of Gold” in France.

John Bouchier knight, lorde Berner, first “Translated lute of Frenche into oure maternall Englysshe tongue” the interesting Chronicl of Syr John Froyssart. (S) A Dictionary of Printers and Printing, Timperely, 1839, P298.

Children of Thomas and Elizabeth:

i. Thomas Howard, born 1473 in England.

2/4/1495, Thomas  married Lady Anne, 3rd daughter of King Edward IV.

11/23/1511, Anne died of consumption.

1513, Thomas married Elizabeth, d/o Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham & Elinor Percy.

2/1/1514, Thomas created 2nd Earl of Surrey.

5/2/1521, Surrender by Thomas Howard, knt., Earl of Surrey, to Hen. VIII., of the manor of Evyndon, which the King … granted to the Earl's late wife Anne, one of the daughters of Edward IV., and her children; on account of the decease of whom and of her issue the said manor has descended to the Earl for his life. (S) Ancient Deeds, V1, 1890, A.1402.

5/21/1524, Thomas became 3rd Duke of Norfolk on his father’s death.

8/25/1554, Thomas died at Kenninghall, Norfolk.

ii. Elizabeth Howard, born ? in England.

Elizabeth married Sir Thomas Boleyn.

Children: Anne Boleyn. Anne 2nd wife of King Henry VIII. Anne mother of Queen Elizabeth I.

iii. Muriel Howard (46173), born 1486 in England.  


Followers

Blog Archive