Tuesday, July 10, 2012

G27: 94555184 Henry the Liberal-Marie of France


94555184. Count Henry I “the Liberal” & 94555185. Princess Marie of France


1126, Henry born in France, s/o 378220994. Count Thibaut II of Champagne & 378220995. Matilda of Carinthia.
8/1/1137, Louis VII succeeded as king of France.
1139, Henri named as the son of Count Thibaut II in one of his charters.
1143, Henry was with his father when he did homage to the duke of Burgundy.
1145, Marie born in France, d/o 189110370. King Louis VII & 47277569. Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine.
1146, “I, Thibaut, count of Blois, make known … that Josbert of La Ferte-sur-Aube, about to go to Jerusalem, has given … I and my son Henry have approve this donation, since the property is in fief from me, …” (S) Fuedal Society, Evergates, 1993, P109.
6/1147, Henry left on the 2nd crusade with King Louis VII.
1147 in Constantinople, Henry knighted by Emperor Manuel.
12/25/1147, On Christmas day on the coast of modern-day Turkey, encamped by a river, a tremendous storm washed away much of the supplies of the French. They decided to take a route over the mountains to Antioch.
1/4/1148, The crusaders fought in a battle at Laodicea against the Turks.
1/7/1148 in the area of Mount Cadmus, at night, the rear guard was surrounded and attacked. The French suffered many losses. Louis decided to return to his water route.
1/20/1148, After additional battles, the crusaders reached Atalya.
3/19/1148, The crusaders reached Antioch.
6/24/1148, Henry listed at the assembly of nobles by Baldwin III at Acre.
1148, On crusade, Marie promised in marriage to Henry by her parents.
1148, At Damascus, due to heat, lack of water, and disagreements on plans, a seige failed after 4 days. Louis sent most of the forces home.
1149, Back from the crusade, Henry took the reigns as count of Bar-sur-Aube and Vitry.
1/1152, Henry, age 25, became Count of Champagne and Troyes on the death of his father; leaving the other family properties to his brothers.
5/18/1152 in Poitiers Cathedral, Henry, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou married Marie’s mother. [Marie would become half-sister to both the King of France and the King of England.]
1152, Henry’s brother Thibaut V, count of Blois, appointed royal seneschal.
1153, Henry was betrothed to Marie, who was placed in the convent of Avenay until reaching the age of marriage.
1154, Henry, count of Troyes, sealed his first act. [Henry styled himself as count of Troyes, which was not of the king or a prelate.]
1154, Henry did homage to the archbishop of Reims for the castle of Vertus. [Henry held 9 castles of the See.]
12/19/1154 at Westminster, Marie’s step-father Henry crowned King Henry II of England.
1155, Henry supported King Louis’ attempt to bring peace throughout the kingdom.
1159, “… I, Henry, count palatine of Troyes, wish it to be known … at the request of Alice of Mareuil, tutor of my wie the countess [Marie], I have given … to the nuns of Saint-Pierre of Aveny eight sextarii of revenue … Witnesses to the gift … Marie, countess of Troyes; …”
5/1160, Henry witnessed the peace treaty between the kings of England and France, as negotiated by Pope Alexander III. (S) Henry II, Hosler, 2007, P63.
1160, Robert, count of Dreux, promised in a letter to render his fortress of Savignies to Count Henry I of Champagne. (S) Charters, Cartularies and Archives; Winroth, 2002, P133. [Robert and Henry were in a dispute because Robert had constructed fortification with a moat.]
1160, Chretien de Troyes [1135-83], became Marie’s court writer [author of one of the earliest romances about King Arthur.]
11/1160, Henry arranged for his sister Adela to marry King Louis VII of France.
1162, Henry a mediator between Emperor Frederick I and King Louis during the papal schism.
1164, Henry married Marie on her arrival at Troyes.
12/1166, Henry held a Christmas court.
1168 at Soissons, Henri, Comtes de Campagne, and the Philip, Comtes de Flanders, treating for peace with King Louis.
3/1168, Henri, Comtes de Campagne sought out King Henry in Normandy to get his ratification of the treaty with King Louis.
9/29/1168, Henry’s brother William is consecrated Archbishop of Sens.
1171 in Blois, Henry ordered 30 Jews to be burned at the stake for the alleged ritual murder of a christian. (S) Jews of Medieval France, Taitz, 1994, P142.
1171-72, Archbishop Henry of Reims began a border war with Henry.
1172, Henri had an army of about 1900 knights in 26 castellanies.
1173-4, Henry supported the [unsuccessful] rebellion of King Henry’s eldest 3 sons.
1174, Marie was with her mother at her Court in Poitiers, which had become a center of culture, when she wrote in a letter “love cannot exist between a husband and wife.”
1174, “I Henry, count palatine of Troyes, make known … that I have assigned to Mary, my most beloved sister formerly duchess of Burgundy, 10 pounds in annual rents of Troyes … annually for her life. After her death they will remain ... of the church of Fontevrault for celebrating the anniversary of my sister. … Witness to this were: the countess my wife, …” (S) Epistolæ.
1174, Henri asked Garnier of Trainel to arbitrate a disputer between to powerful monasteries.
7/22/1174, King Louis with Philip, comte of Flanders; Hugh, duke of Burgundy; Theobald, comte of Blois; and Henry, comte of Champagne, laid siege to Rouen.
1176, Henry of Champagen and Aimery of Lusignan in conflict over Jaffa-Ascalon. (S) Proceedings American Philosophical Society, V128, 1984, P143.
1177, Henry and King Louis VII planned another crusade to the holy lands.
1177, Henry, count of Champagne, founded an annual memorial service for himself in the collegiate church of Notre-Dame of Oulchy, consisting of two dinners [with detailed menus], which should follow the funeral service. (S) Social France at the Time of Philip Augustus, Luchaire, 1912, P115.
1178, Henry had his sergeants collect information on his fief holders throughout his realm. [1,899 fiefs were recorded, 12 held by women.]
1179, The Lateran Council declared those slain in tournaments were denied christian burial. Champagne was famous for hosting tournaments.
5/1179, Peter de Courtenay went to Jerusalem with Henry, Comte of Troyes, and other French knights. [In the summer of 1179 the battle of Jacob’s Ford was fought about 100 miles north of Jerusalem. About 800 Templars and crusaders were killed. Its is known that most of Henry’s knights did not return.]
1179-81, Countess Marie became regent of Champagne while Henry was on crusade.
1180, Returning home, Henry was captured by the Sultan of Rum and ransomed by Emperor Manuel.
9/24/1180, Henry was in Constantinople visiting Emperor Manuel when he died. [Manuel’s son Alexis II was married to Henry’s niece Anges, d/o Queen Adele of France.] (S) Li Premerains Vers, Jones, 2011, P256.
9/18/1180, Philip Augustus succeeded as King of France on the death of Marie’s father. [Marie’s younger half-brother.]
3/17/1181, Henry died in Champagne [buried in a tomb of his design at Saint-Etienne.]
1181-87, Countess Marie, the regent of Champagne while her son Henry was a minor. Marie appointed Haice of Plancy as her chancellor.
1181, Queen Adela of France, Countess Marie, regent of Champagne, Baldwin V, count of Hainaut, and Count Philip of Flanders came to Provens in Champagne and renewed previous marriage pacts. (S) Chronicle of Hainaut, Napran, 2005, P76.
1182, Philip of Flanders proposed marriage to Marie [Philip eventually married Mathida of Portugal.] (S) The Romances of Chretien de Troyes, Duggan, 2001, P20.
1182-86, Andreas le Chapelain witnessed 9 of Marie’s charters. (S) Arthurian Narrative, Echard, 1998, P112.
1184, Queen Adela, dowager queen of France, and step-mother of Marie, visited Marie at court in Champagne. (S) Queens in Stone and Silver, Nolan, 2009, P102.
12/1185 at Sens, Marie received by King Philip  in a conference that included her brothers-in-law, for the purpose of reconciling the king with the powerful Champagne family. (S) The Eructavit, McKibben, 1907, P13.
7/1187, Marie’s son Henry succeeded to rule of Champagne. Marie moved into Fountaines-les-Nonnes, a Fontevrist priory near Meaux, and took the vows of a nun.
11/3/1189, Richard I crowned king of England.
5/1190-97, Marie’s son Henry went on crusade. Marie again was regent.
1190, Marie appointed Gautier of Chapes as chanecellor.
1192, Evrat began the oldest copy of the the French versification of the book of Genesis at the request of Marie of Champagne. (S) Les Manuscrits de Chretien de Troyes, V1, Busby, 1993, P197.
1193, King Richard I of England, while a captive in Germany wrote to his half-sister Countess Marie, a plea for help disguised as a complaint about all his friends and relatives who had not come to his aid.
9/1197, On the death of her son Henry while on crusade, Marie assumed the role of regent for her younger son Thibaut III. [Henry had been named King of Jerusalem while on Crusade.]
3/11/1198, Marie died.
(S) Epistolæ. (S) The Aristocracy of the County of Champagne, Evergates, 2007. (S) Feudal Society in Medieval France, Evergates, 1993, P64. (S) The Capetians, Bradbury, 2007. (S) Court, Household and Itinerary of King Henry II, Eyton, 1878.

Family notes:

·         Under Henry, the Champagne Fairs became a part of long-distance trade and finance in Europe.
·         Marie was a patron of writers, poets, and troubadors.

Children of Henry and Marie:
i. Marie of Champagne (47277603) born 1174 in France.
ii. Thibaut III of Champagne (47277592), born 1181 in France.

Total Pageviews

Followers