Tuesday, April 30, 2013

G29: 378236428 Verdun-Salford


378236428. Bertram de Verdun & 378236428. Rohesia de Salford

~1140, Bertram born in England, s/o §Nicholas de Verdun & Laceline de Clinton, d/o §Geoffrey de Clinton.
12/19/1154, Henry II succeeded King Stephen of England.
1159, Bertram hier to his father.
1160, Bertram issued a charter witnessed by a member of the ‘de Aldithley’ family, of whom Bertram was their ‘overlord’. (S) House of Stanley, Stanley, 1998, P5.
Bertram 1st married to Maud, d/o Robert de Ferrers, Earl of Derby. [No children.]
12/9/1165, William the Lion, age 22, succeeded King Malcom IV of Scotland.
1166, Bertram de Verdon held 2 knight’s fees in chief. (S) Harleian Society, V103, 1951, P109.
11/1166 at Caen, Normandy, Bertram witnessed a royal confirmation to the Abbot of Mont St. Michel.
By 1167, Bertram de Verdun witnessed a deed by which Adam, abbot of Evesham, enfeoffs Simon, son of William de Coctune. (S) Journal of the British Arch. Assoc., V29, 1873, P369.
1169, Bertram, Sheriff of Warwickshire.
2/3/1170, Richard de Humez and Bertram de Verdon at Stamford, Northamptonshire on the King’s business.
1170-71, Warwick and Leicester. Bertram de Verdun renders his account; for 100 seams fo wheat sent to the army of Ireland, 8£ 6s 8d; 300 hogs, 20£; 3 handmills and 1 measure, 13d; 15 days pay for 1 master and 9 seamen, 13s 9d; ....
10/16/1171, Bertram, Seneschal to King Henry II, left with him for Waterford. [After the English Pope Adrian granted Ireland to King Henry, Henry landed at Waterford with 400 knights, 4000 men-at-arms, and 400 ships.]
11/1171, Bertram with King Henry holding court at Dublin.
1171-72, Warwick and Leicester:– Bertram de Verdun renders his account; … wheat sent into Ireland, … oats … beans … axes … hogs … pay of seamen … hire of ships … corn … carts to carry the apparel … 2 horses …
4/17/1172, Bertram with King Henry sailed from Wexford for South Wales.
1172, Bertram a Justice in Eyre.
4/1173, King Henry’s 3 eldest surviving sons: Henry, Richard & Geoffrey rebelled against him; supported by their mother. King Henry hired 20,000 mercenaries and quickly put down the rebellion.
1173, Bertram built his stone house at Alton.
1173-74, Bertram in the chronicle of Jordan Fantosme describing the war between the English and the Scots, and in particular an event at Leicester: “Lord Bertram de Verdun was there this day newly arrived, He had fine arms and a horse very fleet, From many he justed he the prize carried off.” (S) Chronicle …, 1840.
1174, Rich. Humet & Bertram de Verdun give land to build a church at Sanfordbridge. (S) Academia Tertia Anglicanna, Peck, 1727, P82.
10/11/1174 at Falaise, France, Bertram of Verdun witnessed treaties with the King of Scots. (S) Feudal Assessments, Keefe, 1983, P104.
12/8/1174 at Valognes, An agreement is formed between William, king of Scots, and Henry (II), king of the English, son of the Empress Matilda. King William becomes the liege man of the king against all men, for Scotland, … He also does homage and swears fealty to the King Henry, his son (i.e., Henry the young king), reserving the fealty due to his father the king … witnesses … Bertran de Verdun. (S) POMS.
1175, Bertram a member of the Curia Regis.
Bef. 6/1175, Bertram witnessed the gift of Weston by the King to Guy le Strange, sheriff of Shropshire.
7/9/1175, Pleas in Staffordshire held by William Basset, William fitz Ralph, and Bertram de Verdon before the King.
8/10/1175, at York, The King held Pleas of the Forest; ‘Placita et convencioues per Willielmum fil. Radulphi, Bertram de Verdon, et Willielmum Basset in curia Regis.’
1/1176 at Shrewsbury, Bertram witnessed a royal charter to Haughmond abbey.
1/1176, Bertram with William fitz Stephen and Turstan fitz Simon appointed as justices for Hereford, Gloucestershire, Shropshire, and Worcestershire.
4/4/1176, Bertram witnessed a royal charter confirming an agreement between William de Roumare and sisters Burgeise and Emma [sisters of William Bruere].
1176, Bertram de Verdun gave to the monks of Aulnay, near Bayeux, Normandy, the land of Chotes [Cotton near Croxden] for the foundation of the Cistercian abbey of the Valley of St. Mary. (S) Journal of the British Arch. Assoc., V21, 1865, P296.
1/1177 at the Great Council at Northampton, Bertram witnessed a royal confirmation to Thomas, son of Robert fitz Noel.
3/20/1177, at Marlborough, King Henry sent John Comyn, Bertram de Verdon, and Robert of Shrewsbury as ambassadors to Spain. [King Henry had previously in the month been an arbitrator in a case involving Spain.]
1178, Bertram assigned as a justice in eyre in Lincolnshire.
1179, Bertram assigned as a justice in eyre. [6 of the 8 from the previous year returned to justice in eyre appointments.] (S) Chronicle of the Reigns, Petersborough, 1867, P-LXXI.
4/1180, Bertram appointed to the office of sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire. [13 newly appointed sheriffs had been justices in eyre.]
6/30/1180 at Caen, Normandy, Bertram de Verdon witnessed a royal charter to William de Humez of the office of Constabulariam, which his father Richard used to hold.
7/1180 at Rouen, Bertram witnessed a royal charter to Roger Barr.
8/1181, Bertram a witness to royal charters at Pontefract and Clipston.
12/1181 at Winchester, Bertram witnessed a royal charters to Godstow nunnery and Dureford abbey.
12/1182, Bertram of Verdun a member of the assizes of Christmas Court at Caen, France. (S) Feudal Assessments, Keefe, 1983, P104.
1183, Bertram crossed the channel on a king’s writ: ‘In passagio Johannis electi Ebroicensis et Bertami de Verdon 48s per breve Regis’.
12/1183 at Valonias, Bertram de Verdon witnessed a royal charter to St. Lo.
1184-85, Bertran de Verdun, Arnald de Barton for him, renders his account; paid for the passage into Ireland of the knights and attendents of John, the K.’s son, 34£.
4/1185, Charter of Prince John [Johannes filius Domini Regis Anglian et Dominus Hiberniae] to the Irish monastery of Saneta Maria de Valle Salutis witnessed by Hugh de Lacy, constable of Ireland; Bertran de Verdon, seneschal of Ireland, and Gilbert Vipard.
1185-86, Honor of Chester:– Bertram de Verdun, Adam de Almondelegh for him … for the passage of Ireland of 9 ships with men, of John the K’s son, and their harness, 23£ 5s 4d; … ship to carry supplies … passage to Ireland of William Cumin and his men … of William de Casineto, his associates, and 10 horses …
1185, Bertram replaced as sheriff of Warwick and Leicester by Michael Beler. (S) Topographical History – Leicester, Curtis, 1831, P-XXI.
1186-87, Honor of Chester:– Bertram de Verdun, Adam de Audeley for him, renders his account, for the passage of John de Courci into Ireland, 10£ 3s 4d … pay for 7 days for 13 archers whom Robert de Multhalt retained in the king’s service, 45s. 6d. …
6/14/1188 at Gaitinton, Bertram de Verdon present for a fine before the King between the abbot of Lilleshall and William de Boterell, and Ysabella his wife.
9/3/1189, Richard I succeeded King Henry II of England.
12/12/1189, Bertram with Richard departed on the 3rd Crusade. Richard commandeered ships and ordered them to Dover to move some of his forces to France. The fleet was then to move to Marsailles to meet up with the combined English and French troops.
7/1190, The English and French armies met at Lyons; where they learned that the German Emperor, leading his forces to the crusade, had died in an accident.
1191, The crusaders captured the city of Messina, Sicily, after they had refused to let the English ships land.
4/1191, 24 ships sank in a storm on the way to Cyprus.
6/5/1191, The crusaders set sail for Acre. [The French forces were already besieging the city. Seige engines were launching objects at walls, troops were trying to fill in the moat, and other troops were tunneling under the walls; but the various national groups were acting independently.]
7/1191, The crusaders captured Acre. Saladin’s city commander agreed to surrender for a ransom of 200,000 gold pieces, the release of 1500 christians, and the Muslim garrison to be given safe conduct. When Acre fell, Bertram appointed a joint Governor of the city. Many of the forces, especially the Germans, returned home.
9/5/1191, The crusaders defeated Saladin at the battle of Arsuf.
9/8/1191, The crusaders arrived a Jaffa to find it’s fortifications destroyed. [King Richard spent 3 months repairing the fortifications at Jaffa and along the road back to Acre.]
12/1191, The crusaders arrived at Beit Nuba, 12 miles from Jerusalem.
1/1192, The crusaders decided to return to Jaffa when they decided they could not begin a siege. They moved to Ascalon, on the coast south of Acre, and spent 4 months rebuilding its fortifications.
4/1192, The crusaders held an election for King of Jerusalem – won by Conrad de Montferrat. [Conrad was murdered soon afterwards in Tyre by members of the original Muslim “Assassins”, who had also attempted to kill Saladin.]
8/1/1192, The crusaders conducted a sea assault on Jaffa, which had been recaptured by Saladin.
8/4/1192, Saladin’s army attacked King Richard’s 80 knights, 400 archers, and a small force of lancers, camped outside the city walls.
8/25/1192, Bertram died at Jaffa; his sword, banner and armor were returned to England to Alton castle. [The Exchequer would later claim he owed £551 to the crown at his death; a dept which was even later cleared.]
5/27/1199, John succeeded King Richard I of England.
1216, Rohesia died.
(S) Cal. of Doc’s. Relating to Ireland, 1875. (S) Court, Household, and Itinerary of King Henry II, Eyton, 1878.
Family notes:
Bef. 1189, “Bertramus de Verdun” founded Croxden abbey, for the souls of “Normanni de Verdune patris mei et Lucelinæ matris meæ et Richardi de Humez qui me nutrivit” and for the salvation of “mea et Roehais uxoris meæ”, by undated charter, witnessed by “... Roberto de Verdun, Waltero de Canvile, …” (S) FMG.
Child of Bertram and Rohesia:
i. Nicholas de Verdon (189118214), born ~1170 in England. [3rd son]

Monday, April 29, 2013

G29: 378236416 FitzAlan-Say


378236416. William Fitz Alan & 378236417. Isabel de Say & 16886917. Christina ?

8/5/1100, Henry I crowned King of England.
~1105, William born in Breton, Normandy, s/o §Alan Fitz Flaald & Aveline de Hesding. (S) FMG.
1114, William’s father died; William inheriting 70 manors in various part of Shropshire, and others outside the county.
4/24/1124, David I crowned King of Scotland.
1/1127, Queen Adeliza, receiving the county of Salop from King Henry, granted the office of sheriff to William fitz Alan. (S) Antiquities of Shropshire, V1, 1854, P247. [Likely undersheriff to Pagan fitz John.]
~1130, Isabel born in England, heir & d/o §Helias de Say, Lord of Clun. (S) Cartulary of Lilleshall Abbey, Monasticon, V6, P262.
William 1st married Christiana, a kinswoman [niece] of Robert, Earl of Gloucester, half-brother to Empress Matilda. [No male surviving issue.]
12/22/1135, Stephen crowned king of England.
1136, William son and heir of Alan fitz Flaald witnessed a charter of King Stephen to Shrewsbury abbey.
1137, William fitz Alan became the sheriff of Shropshire after the death of Pagan fitz John. (S) Anglo-Norman Studies, 2007, P204.
By 1138, William FitzAlan founded the Augustinian priory of Haughmond, Shropshire. (S) FMG.
1138, William the sheriff of Shropshire. (S) FMG.
1138, William, Castellan of Shrewsbury.
5/1138, William, now a kinsman of Robert, Earl of Gloucester, held Shrewsbury castle for him in his rebellion against King Stephen.
8/1138, King Stephen prevailed against the town of Shrewsbury. William fled with his family and left the castle to others who were to surrender it to the King. [The holders of the castle did not surrender, and after a siege, several of those captured, including William’s uncle Arnulf de Hesdinge, were executed.]
1138, John le Strange witnessed a grant by William fitz Alan and his wife Christiana of land in Sheriff Hales to Haughmond church. (S) A Chronicle of the Early Le Stranges, Le Strange, 1916, P25.
2/1141, William, as described by a contemporary writer, fought at the battle of Lincoln on the side of the Empress “in no way inferior to the great Earls who supported her cause”. [King Stephen captured in the battle.]
7/1141 at Oxford, William fitz Alan and his brother Walter witnessed a charter of Empress Maud. (S) Antiquities of Shropshire, V7, Eyton, 1858, P287.
9/14/1141, William a member of Empress Matilda’s forces defeated at the battle of Winchester. [What had started as a siege of by the Matilda’s forces of the royal palace, ended with a siege of the royal castle by the king’s forces.] (S) King Stephen, King, 2011, P169. [Empress Matilda’s brother Robert, earl of Gloucester captured; exchanged for King Stephen the following November; Stephen again crowned King in December.]
Aft. 1141, William fitz Alan attested, with Robert de Dunstanville, Empress Matilda’s grant of Aston to Shrewsbury abbey. (S) Geoffrey de Mandeville, Round, 1892, P418.
1142-48, William spent much of the civil war on his wife’s estate at Keevil in Wiltshire; but also was in Bristol and other places controlled by the Empress. (S) Anglo-Norman Studies, 2007, P204.
10/1147, Empress Maltilda’s half-brother and leader of her forces, Robert, earl of Gloucester, died. [The same year many knights and nobles, including the husband of Empress Matilda, left on crusade; creating a lull in the civil war.]
6/1148, Empress Matilda returned to Normandy. [Matilda would never return to England; but her son Duke Henry would.]
1149, Madog ap Maredudd of Powys built a castle at Owestry because William fitz Alan did not have the forces to oppose him. (S) Struggle for Mastery, Carpenter, 2003, P186. [William, possibly at Bristol, was likely campaigning in support of Duke Henry who was attacking York.]
6/7/1153, William with Henry, Duke of Normandy [future King Henry II], at Leicester when the Duke confirmed his mother’s donations to Haughmond.
1153-4, William married Isabel, Baroness of Clun, the richest heiress in Shropshire. (S) FMG.
12/19/1154, Henry II succeeded King Stephen of England.
Summer/1155, To suppress the rebellion of Hugh de Mortimer, King Henry besieged Cleobury, Wigmore, and Bridgnorth. William a member of the siege forces.
7/7/1155 at Brug during the siege of Bridgnorth, William fitz Alan witnessed a royal charter to Shrewsbury abbey.
7/25/1155, William named by King Henry II as Sheriff of Shropshire; and had his estates restored; and on the same day granted Wroxeter church to Haughmond abbey. (S) Antiquities, V6, P73.
9/1156, ‘Wills fili Alani. Redd Comp.’ in Shropshire discharges his account of the ferm of the King’s demesnes of a sum of £3 11s 4d. (S) FMG.
1157, William, sheriff of Shropshire, supported King Henry’s invasion of Gwynedd, Wales with archers.
1157, William with King Henry II invaded Gwynedd; where the king was nearly killed by the forces of Owain at the battle of Ewloe.
1158, ‘Salopescira.’ Willelmus filius Alani reddit compotum de … in terris datis Johanni Extraneo [7£ 10s] …’, associated with the manor of Ness.
By 1158, William gave the land of ‘Piperinges’ to Haughmond abbey, adding to grants as had been made by ‘his mother Avelina.’
4/1158 at Newnham, Gloucestershire, William witnessed a royal charter to Haughmond abbey, Shropshire.
By 1159, William fitz Alan gave his consent for his knight Gerold de Brelecton to make a land gift to Buildwas abbey. (S) Collections – Staffordshire, V1, 1880, P215.
9/1159, William fitz Alan associated with a payment of £7 10s for the manor of Ness.
4/1160, William died; buried in Shrewesbury abbey. [William gave lands ‘together with his body’ to Shrewsbury abbey; attested by 4 ecclesiastics and 12 laymen including Guy le Strange of Alveley and John le Strange of Cheswardine.]
By 1165, Isabel married 2nd Geoffrey de Vere; gaining possession of Clun and Ruthin castles.
7/1165, Geoffrey de Vere, sheriff of Shropshire, and stepfather of William fitz Alan, Baron of Clun and Owestry.
1170, Geoffrey died.
Bef. 1188, Isabel married 3rd William Boterel.
6/14/1188 at Gaitinton, a fine was levied before King Henry between the Abbot of Lilleshall, and William de Boterell and Ysabella his wife.
~1199, Isabel died.
(S) Antiquities of Shropshire, V7, Eyton, 1858. (S) Court, Household and Itinerary of King Henry II, Eyton, 1878. (S) Lestrange Records, LeStrange, 1916.
Family notes:
·         Undated: William Fitz Alan donated the fishery of Upton-upon-Severn to Haughmond abbey by undated charter, witnessed by ‘Walter his brother, Christiana his wife’. (S) FMG.
·         Undated: ‘William Fitz-Alan with his wife, Dame Christiana, give to God and to the church of St. John of Hamon, … for the remission of the grantors’ sins and the souls’ redemption of their parents and ancestors, and especially for the soul of their son Alan, whose body they had bestowed in burial there [Haughmond].’
·         1161, John le Strange, for the soul of his lord, William Fitz-Alan, son of Alan Fitz-Flaald, gave lands in Iselham to Shrewsbury abbey. (S) Collections – Montgomeryshire, V14, 1881, P288.
·         William’s brother, Walter fitz Alan [died 1177 – ancestor of the House of Stewart]: Walter, son of Alan, was the third son of Alan, son of Flaald. Walter entered the service of David I around 1136 and by the end of his reign, he had become High Steward, an office which was to become hereditary. In later generations, Walter’s descendents would adopt this title as their surname: ‘Stewart’. Walter married Eschina and they had a son, Alan [died 1204], who served as steward to William I. (S) POMS.

Child of William and Christina:
i. Christina FitzAlan (378236416), born ~1153 in England.
Child of William and Isabel:
i. William II FitzAlan (189118208), born ~1155 in England.

Sunday, April 28, 2013

G29: 378254212 FitzPeter-Cauz


378254212. Adam fitz Peter & 378254213. Maud de Cauz

~1160, Matilda d/o §Robert de Cauz & Sybil Basset.
1186, Matilda’s father died.
1194, Adam fitz Peter had a duel [likely by proxy] with Simon de Lascelles over 24 carcuates of land at Birkin. Adam was victorius. (S) Thoresby Society, V9, 1899, P49.
5/27/1199, John succeeded King Richard I of England.
1207, Adam fitz Peter de Birkin died.
10/28/1216, Henry III, age 9, crowned king of England.
1221, Matilda gave 700£ for seisin of her paternal lands.
1223, Matila married 2nd Ralph fitz Stephen, being dowered with Winterburn in Gloucestershire.
Bef. 5/25/1224, Matilda died.
(S) Miscellanea of Thoresby Society, V41, 1954.
Family notes:
·         Constance de Cauz, sister of Matilda, married Adam’s brother Thomas fitz Peter de Leeds.
·         Robert de Caux [died 1186] s/o Robert de Caux [died 1131] & Anneis ?; s/o Geoffrey Aselin [died 1108-09].
·         Adam fitz Peter aka: “Adam de Falthwaite” and “Adam fitz Peter fitz Asolf”, in early charters; “Adam fitz Peter de Birkin” in later charters.
·         Adam de Birkin appears in many charters, the earliest, after 1131, as a witness [as Adam s/o Peter fitz Essolf] to the founding of the Drax by William Paganell.

Child of Adam and Maud:
i. John de Birkin (189127106), born ~1180 in England.

Friday, April 26, 2013

G29: 378220818 Namur-Luxembourg


378220818. Godfrey, compte de Namur & 378220819. Ermesinde, Ctss de Luxembourg

Aft. 1065, Godfrey born in Namur, s/o §Albert III de Namur & Ida von Sachsen.
By 1080, Gottfried named in a document.
1087, Emperor Henry IV became Duke of Lower Lorraine, which included Namur.
1087, Godfrey married to Sibylle de Porcien, d/o Count Roger of Château-Porcéan .
1097, Godfrey,  Comte de Château-Porcien, by right of his first wife.
1099, Emperor Henry IV gave the county of Brunegeruz to Albert III, count of Namur.
Ermesinde, born in Luxembourg, d/o §Conrad I, comte de Luxemburg & Clemence ?.
Ermesinde 1st married Albert II Graf von Dagsbug.
6/1/1101, ‘Heinricus … tertius Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed the foundation of St Jakob, Liège by ‘Albertus comes Nammucensium filiis [suis] Godefrido, Heinrico, Alberto.’
6/22/1102, Godefroi succeeded his father as Comte de Namur.
7/31/1102, Godfrey’s mother died.
1104, Godfrey, count of Namur, fought in Lotharingia. (S) Luxemburg  in the Middle Ages, P86.
1104, Godfrey divorced his first wife on grounds of an illicit relationship with Enguerrand de Boves, Comte d’Amiens, Sire de Coucy.
Albert II Graf von Dagsbug died.
3/22/1106, The communal army of Liege accompanied Duke Henry of Limbourg and Godfrey of Namur  met and defeated 300 German knights near the bridge at Vise. (S) Art of Warfare, Verbruggen, 1997, P154. [They were defending Emperor Henry IV who was under attack by his son Henry V.]
1109, Godfrey married Erminsinde.
1110, Godfrey, count of Namur, built a fortress on the side of a hill above the town of Bouvignes. (S) Penny Cyclopaedia, V5, 1836, P291.
4/23/1119, Frederic of Namur, younger brother of Godfrey, appointed Bishop of Liege by Pope Calixtus II. (S) Calixtus the Second, Stroll, 2004, P191.
11/27/1121, ‘Godefridus comes Namurcensis et Ermensendis comitissa’ founded the abbey of Floreffe, with consent of ‘Adelberto, Henrico, Clementia, Beatrice, Adelaide’.
1124, Ermensendis comitissa Namucensis’ confirmed the donation of property to the church of Verdun Sainte-Vanne by ‘senioris mei comitis Alberti’.
1/7/1125, ‘Godefridus comes Namucensis et Ermensindis comitissa’ made a donation to the abbey of Floreffe with the consent of ‘filiis suis Alberto et Heinrico’.
9/13/1125, Lothair III of Supplinburg crowned King of Germany.
6/13/1128, Godfrey named in a document of Lothair III at Aix-la-Chapelle. (S) Ancestry of Thomas Bradbury, Threlfall, 1988.
6/17/1129, Ermensinde’s parentage confirmed in a charter of Meginher, archbishop of Trier, confirming the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by ‘Clementia … comitissa’ with the consent of ‘filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis’.
1130, ‘Ermensendis comitissa de Muhalt, quæ uxor … comitis Alberti’ founded the monastery of Saint-Victor, Huy.
1130, Godfrey and Ermesinde, who had founded a Cistercian house on the Sambre, near Namur; had Pope Innocent II consecrate the church. (S) Life of St. Juliana of Cornillon, Bradbury, 1873, P171.
3/1131 at Liege, Godfrey with King Lothair when he met with Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. (S) Ancestry of Thomas Bradbury, Threlfall, 1988.
1131, ‘Ducem Godefridum seniorem eiusque filium … Godefridum iuniorem’ donated property to Gembloux.
1131 in Namur, Pope Innocent II consecrated the main altar of the church of the abbey of Geronsart.
6/4/1133, Lothair III of Germany became Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.
1136, Erminsinde heiress to her nephew, Conrad II, comte de Luxemburg, of all the fiefs and half the allods. [The other half of the allods went to Conrad’s sister, who could not inherit because feminine succession was not recognized.]
1137, ‘Comitissa de Musal Ermensendis cum viro suo Namucensi comite Godefrido’ donated property to Flone.
1137, Godfrey of Namur at war with Godfrey I of Brabant. [Gilles of Chin, called ‘the most virtuous in arms of all knights living’, a knight of Hainaut, died in a battle of this war.]
8/19/1139, Godrey died.
6/26/1141, Erminsinde died.
(S) Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. (S) Chrinicle of Hainaut, Mons, 2005.
Family notes:
·         Clemence, widow of Conrad I, comte de Luxemburg, married 2nd Gerhard I, count of Geldern, and had Yolende of Gueldre, wife of Baldwin III Count of Hainaut.  Yolende and Erminsinde were half sisters, respectively mothers of Baldwin IV of Hainaut & Alix of Namur.
·         Namur is a municipality in southern Belgium.

Children of Godfrey and Sibylle:
i. Elisabeth de Namur, born ? in Namur.

Elisabeth married 1st Gervais, comte de Rethel [died 1124.]
Bef. 1131, Elisabeth married 2nd Clarembaldus de Roseto, lord of Rozoy-sur-Serre.

ii. Flandrine de Namur, born ? in Namur.

Flandrine married Hugh of Espinoy.

Children of Godfrey and Ermesinde:
i. Albert de Namur, born aft. 1109 in Namur.

1125-1136, Albert died.

ii. Henri L’Aveugle (47277610), born 1111 in Namur.
iii. Clemence de Namur, born ? in Namur.

1130, Clemence married Konrad Herzog von Zahringen, s/o Berthod II Herzog von Zahringen [a duke of Swabia] & Agnes von Rheinfelden.
1/8/1152, Konrad died.
12/28/1158, Clemence died.

iv. Beatrix de Namur, born ? in Namur.

Beatrix married Ithier, comte de Rethel, s/o Eudes de Vitry, comte de Rethel.
1160, Beatrice died.

v. Alix of Namur (189110409), born ~1120 in Namur.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

G29: 378220862 Boulogne-Scotland


378220862. Eustace III of Boulogne & 378220863. Mary of Scotland

~1060, Eustace born in Boulogne, s/o 756441724. Eustace II of Boulogne & 756441725. Ida of Lotharingia.
9/1066, Eustace given as a hostage at Rouen by his father during the invasion of England.
1087, Eustace and his father witnessed a grant to Bec by William of Breteuil.
1087, Eustace succeeded his father as Comte de Boulogne et de Lens.
9/26/1087, William Rufus crowned King of England; succeeding William the Conqueror. His elder brother Robert became Duke of Normandy.
1088, Eustace, with Bishop Odo of Bayeux and Robert of Belleme supported the succession of Duke Robert over his brother William in England. Eustace forfeited the Honour of Boulogne and was exiled by King William.
1088, Eustace and Robert of Belleme crossed to England and held the castle of Rochester against King William; but did not receive support and had to surrender.
~1090, Mary of Scotland d/o 378220550. King Malcolm III of Scotland & 378220551. Saint Margaret. [Mary educated in England by the nuns at Wilton.] (S) King Stephen, King, 2010, P103.
1091, Eustace with his allies Guy, count of Ponthieu, and Hugh I, count of St. Pol witnessed an act of Abbot Lambert.
1091, Eustace attended the Flemish court in a case involving the abbey of St. Bertin.
2/1092, Eustace attested the charter of Duke Robert to the abbey of Bec.
1096 at the Flemish court, Eustace present at a lawsuit concerning St. Bertin with Robert II, count of Flanders.
1096, Eustace issued his 1st charter, witnessed by his brother Baldwin.
9/1096, Eustace attended the crusade with his brothers Godfrey of Bouillon, duke of Lower Lotharingia, and Baldwin of Boulogne as a member of the retinue of Robert II, count of Flanders.
4/1097, The crusaders sailed from Brindisi to Durazzo; then overland by the Via Egnatia road to Constantinople. [Albert of Aix records the arrival in Constantinople of ‘Robertus Normannorum comes, Stephanus Blesensis, Eustachius frater prædicti Ducis.’]
6/1097, The crusaders reached Nicea, joining a siege in process, while be harrassed by mounted archers of Kilij Arslan [who’s wife was in the city]. In a poem about the battle: “Look you! Count Eustace, who was of Boulogne, And goes to strike a Turk with a Viennese lance, With the length of his full lance he strikes him dead in the joncois.’ (S) The Crusades, Semaan, 2003, P88.
6/30/1097, Half the forces a day ahead of the other half encamped in a valley near Dorylaeum in Aisa Minor. The next morning they were attacked by archers of Kilij Arslan. Forming a defensive perimeter, they held off the attack until the Moslems were suprised by the arrival of the 2nd half of the force and had to flee, leaving behind horses and camels, as well as treasure. They then moved south.
8/1097, The crusaders reached Iconium in Asia Minor, closely populated by Armenian Christians.
8/1097, Traveling east, the crusaders engaged Seljuks at Heraclea, easily winning the city. The crusaders then divided their forces again, one part taking the Roman road that went shortest distance, but required difficult mountainous conditions; the other taking a longer, safer route, that could encounter early snowfalls.
1097, Leaving Caesarea, they traveled through the mountains capturing small towns including Coxon. [From a letter of Stephen of Blois: “… we conquered for the Lord all Romania and afterwards Cappadocia. And we learned that there was a certain Turkish prince Assam, dwelling in Cappadocia; thither we directed our course. All his castles we conquered by force and compelled him to flee to a certain very strong castle situated on a high rock …”] Clearing the Taurus mountains, they arrived at Antioch [which Stephen of Blois said of it: “a very great city, stronger than one can imagine, and utterly impregnable.”]
10/1097 at Antioch, the crusaders 1st captured the Iron Bridge to seal access from the east.
12/1097-2/1098, Cold and rain prevented much activity. [A chronicler noted that by February, as many had died of sickness as had died in battle.]
6/3/1098, In a swift assualt through gates opened by crusaders that had scaled the walls at night, Antioch fell. The next day they were attacked by a Moslem army of Kerbogha, who laid siege to the city. [During this time they discovered the lance that was used to pierce the side of Jesus – which they saw as divine intervention on their part.]
6/28/1098, The crusaders went on the offensive and attacked, driving off the disorganized opposition.
1/13/1099, The crusaders started towards Tripoli [leaving there May 16th], and then to Jerusalem.
6/7/1099, The main army came in sight of Jerusalem.
7/8/1099, The crusaders captured Jerusalem. [Describing the moments before the walls were breached, Robert the Monk equated Eustace and his brothers to lions. Godfrey, brother of Eustace, elected the 1st ruler of Jerusalem, not accepting the use of ‘King’ in his title.]
8/12/1099, Eustace fought at the battle of Ascalon.
1100, Eustace returned from the crusade.
7/18/1100, Eustace’s brother Godfrey died.
12/25/1100, Eustace on his return trip, stopping at Liege, renounced his claims on the castle of Bouillon.
1100, Eustace confirmed gifts of his mother Ida, and made a grant to Capelle of relics from the crusade.
8/5/1100, Henry I crowned King of England.
12/25/1100, Eustace’s brother Baldwin crowned the 1st King of Jerusalem [in Bethlehem.]
3/10/1101, In an agreement between King Henry I of England and Robert II of Flanders, Eustace is exempted from the terms of the agreement.
1101, Eustace and King Henry I of England reconciled when Henry restored the Honour of Boulogne to Eustace [Henry needed allies since he was expecting an invasion of England by his brother Robert, duke of Normandy, which occurred the next August.]
1101, Eustace, with the consent of King Henry, restored Cripplegate to St. Martin’s le Grand.
9/3/1101, The King [Henry I of England] grants to Bishop Herbert … ‘Nomina primatum et principum:’ Robert count of Ponthieu, Stephen count of Brittany, Robert count of Meulan, Eustace count of Boulogne, Henry earl of Warwick, Simon earl of Northampton, William earl of Warren, William count of Mortain, Count Rogert the Poitevin, Eudes the sewer, Hamon the sewer, William the butler, Richard de Retvers, Robert fitz Hamon, Alan fitz-Flaad, Gilbert Fitz-Richard, Robert Malet, Roger fitz-Richard.
1102, Eustace married Mary. [Florence of Worcester records that Henry I King of England arranged the marriage of ‘Mariam reginæ sororem’ and ‘Eustatio Bononensium comiti’.]
1103-05, Eustace witnessed a grant of King Henry I to St. Peters.
1104, Eustace and Bishop Lambert of Arras reached an agreement, through mediation of Pope Pascal II, over the restoration of 10 altars in the Arras diocese.
8/1104, Eustace attended King Henry of England when he invaded Normandy.
1105, Eustace and Mary founded the priory of Rumilly.
1106, Eustace sought confirmation by Bishop Lambert of Arras of the canons of Lens’ possessions.
1106, Eustace made a gift to the canons of SS Juliand and Botulph, Colchester.
1106, Eustace’s charter to St. Paul’s attested by his sons Raoul and Eustace.
By 1107, King Henry I restored Duxford to Eustace.
1107, Eustace and Mary granted St. Wulmer, Samer, to Cluny.
8/1107, Eustace witnessed a confirmation of King Henry I to Montebourg.
5/1108, Eustace witnessed a grant of King Henry I to Romsey abbey.
8/3/1108, Louis VI crowned King of France.
Bef. 1109, Eustace described as a man of great courage and honesty in ‘The Gesta Francorum expugnantium Iherusalem.’ (S) The Crusades, Semaan, 2003, P87.
2/1110, Matilda, d/o King Henry I of England, landed at Boulogne on her journey to marry King Henry V of Germany. [Eustace likely her escort during this part of the journey.]
1110, Eustace a witness to the Treaty of Dover between King Henry of England and Robert II of Flanders. [Eustace acted as a pledge for both sides.]
1111, Baldwin VII succeeded as Count of Flanders.
Bef. 1112, Eustace granted Frencq to St. Wulmer, Samer.
Aft. 2/1112, Eustace obtained possession of Palendyck.
7/1112, ‘Eustacius Bolonie comes’ confirmed the possession of St. Wulmer to the abbey of Samer.
4/1113, Eustace at King Henry I’s [of England] court in Normandy attested a confirmation to the Bishop of Lisieux.
1113, Eustace’s mother died.
1113, Bishop Lambert of Arras sought clemency from Eustace in a matter associated with a knight of Nigella who had sought refuge in the church of Arras.
1113, Eustace and Mary made a grant to St. Martin des Champs of Frevent church. [The French monarchy also benefactors of St. Martin des Champs.]
3/1113, A general peace agreement between the kings of France and England included an angreement between Eustace and Baldwin VII of Flanders.
1113, Baldwin VII of Flanders visited Lens, and placed Nigella castle under Eustace’s jurisdiction.
Aft. 7/1113, Baldwin VII of Flanders confirmed Eustace’s gift of the sheepfold of Neuenna, Merck to St. Wulmer.
1114, Eustace and Mary visited England.
1114, Mary granted the manor of Kingweston to Bermondsey abbey.
By 1115, Eustace made a gift to the priory of St. Geroges, Hesdin.
5/1116, Mary died; buried at Bermondsey priory.
1116, Eustace confirmed Mary’s grant of Kingweston to Bermondsey.
1117 at St. Omer, Eustace witnessed Baldwin VII’s charter to Watten.
1117, Eustace negotiated a peace between Baldwin VII and Hugh of St. Pol and his ally Gautier of Hesdin. In the peace agreement, Eustace confirmed a grant to St. Georges d’Hesdin that was part of the settlement.
4/1118, Eustace’s younger brother Baldwin I, King of Jerusalem, died; Eustace offered the throne. Eustace traveled as far as Apulia before finding out that Baldwin of Bourcq had already been crowned.
1119, Charles the Good succeeded as Count of Flanders.
2/1120, Eudo, dapifer of King Henry I of England, died. King Henry granted Eustace several of the manors of Eudo: Lillechurch, Kent; Gamelegia, Cambridge; Neuselle, Herts; Roinges, Essex; Widham, Essex; and Ereswelle, Suffolk.
1120, Eustace confirmed Eudo Dapifer’s grant to St John’s, colchester. [Signed by his sons Raoul and Eustace.]
4/1120 at Arras, Eustace III and Hugh III of St. Pol were together acting as counselors in a case before Charles the Good dealing with St Peters, Gent.
1120, Eustace instrumental in a peace agreement between Hugh of St. Pol and Charles the Good of Flanders.
1120, Eustace made a grant to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem. [Signed by his sons Raoul and Eustace.]
1121, Eustace confirmed the grants made by his ancestors to St. Wulmer, Boulogne.
1122, Eustace granted freedom from customs and exactions within Merck to Saint-Bertin, for the souls of ‘Eustacii comitis patris mei et Yde matris mee comitisse.’ [Eustace’s parents].
1122 at Arras, Eustace III a counselor in a case before Charles the Good over the tonlieu of Arras between St. Vaast and the townsmen of Arras. Others present were Hugh of St. Pol and Walter Tirel.
1122-25, Eustace’s illegitimate sons Raoul and Eustace died.
1123, Hugh of St. Pol made a grant of Palendyck to the comital foundation of Bourgourg witnessed by Eustace, ‘Boulonnais count’. [Hugh held Palendyck of Eustace.]
1125, Count Eustace of Boulogne by charter gave his inheritance to his son-in-law Count Stephen.
1125, ‘Eustachius olim comes Boloniensis nunc autem … monachus Cluniacensis’ donated property to Cluny; which names ‘Maria uxore mea …[et] Mathildi filia mea’, and is subscribed by ‘Stephani comitis Bolonie, Matildis comitisse.’
1125, Eustace retired to the Cluny monastery at Rumilly.
1125, Eustace died holding the castles of Bellebrune, Boulogne, Fiennes, Tingry and Lens.
(S) English Historical Review, V34, 1919. (S) Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. (S) Boulogne and Politics, Tanner, 2004.
Family notes:
·         9 copies of the Boulonnais comital genealogy were made between 1087 and 1119 in monastic criptoria of norther France. The 3 brothers were characterized as heroes in the crusade romances ‘Chanson D’Antioch’ and ‘Chanson de Jerusalem.’
·         Eustace minted coins in Lens and Boulogne: obverse – a castle with the legend ‘+EUSTASHIVS’.
·         Eustace made a grant of 7000 herring to be paid on the Feast of St. Andrew to St. Berthe, Blangy.
·         3/22/1136, Eustace’s daughter Mathilde crowned Queen of England at Westminster.

Child of Eustace and Mary:
i. Mathilde of Boulogne (189110431), born ~1105 in Boulogne, France.

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

G27: 94555148 Savoy-Viennois


94555148. Humbert III of Savoy & 94555149. Beatrice of Viennois

8/4/1136, Humbert born in Savoy, s/o 189110310. Amadeus III of Maurienne, count of Savoy & 189110297. Mathilda d’Albon.
1/9/1137, ‘A. comes et marchio cum uxore sua M. … et Umbertus eorum filius.’ donated property to the monastery of Ripalta.
3/30/1143, ‘Amedeus comes et marchio et Maies comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius, donated property to the monastery of Saint-Maurice.
9/25/1143, Pope Celestine II succeeded Pope Innocent II.
3/9/1144, Pope Lucius II succeeded Pope Celestine II.
2/15/1145, Pope Eugene III succeeded Pope Lucius II.
3/30/1147, ‘Amedeus comes et marchio et Majes comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius’ confirmed the rights of the monastery of Saint-Maurice d´Agaune.
1147, ‘Amedeus comes et marchio’ confirmed donations to Saint-Sulpice en Bugey, for the soul of ‘filii mei Humberti’.
8/30/1148, Humbert’s father died on crusade.
7/1149, Humbert at war with the citizens of Turin.
1150, Humbert succeeded as Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie.
1150, ‘Humbertus Mauriacensis comes et marchio’ donated ‘locum de Tyneres’ to the abbey of Hautcrêt.
1150, Count Humbert III confirmed a concession of a golden ‘tabula’ set with precious stones given to his father Amadeus by St. Maurice.
1150, Humbert at St Maurice with the bishops of Lausanne and Sion and made an agreement over a debt.
1150-51, Humbert married Faidiva, [likely] d/o Alphonse Jourdain & Faidiva of Toulouse.
1/3/1151, ‘Umbertus comes, Amedei comitis filius … cum uxore sua … Faidiva’ donated property.
3/4/1152, Frederick Barbarossa elected King of the Germans.
7/8/1153, Pope Eugene III died; succeeded by Pope Anastasius IV.
12/3/1154, Pope Anastasius IV died; succeeded by Pope Hadrian IV.
1155, Humbert married 2nd Gertrude, d/o Thierry, count of Flanders.
6/18/1155, Frederick I crowned Holy Roman Emperor. [Humbert was soon in conflict with Frederick.]
1157, Humbert  held fiefs from the Archbishop of Lyons.
9/7/1159, Pope Alexander III succeeded Pope Adrian IV.
~1160, Beatrix born in Bourgogne, d/o §Gerard, Comte de Mâcon et de Vienne & Guyonne de Salins.
1162, Humbert divorced Gertrude.
1162-3, Humbert leading a group hostile to the Emperor, captured by Count Gerard of Macon, and then ransomed for 6000 marks [which he could not pay.]
1164, Humbert married 3rd Klementia von Zahringen [divorcee], d/o Konrad Herzog von Zähringen & his wife Clémence de Namur.
1164, Humbert in a dispute with Antheleme of Belley.
1165, Charter of Humbert of Savoy to Bonnevaux. (S) Medieval Agriculture, Berman, 1986.
3/1168, Humbert supported the army of Emperor Frederick I as he crossed the Alps returning from Lombardy via Savoy.
1171, Benedict, abbot of Chiusa, in the service of Humbert as an ambassador to England to arrange for a marriage of one of his daughters.
6/28/1172, ‘Umbertus comes de Morienna’ granted privileges to the monastery of Santa Maria di Staffarda.
1172, Humbert has castellans at Miradolo and in the Val di Fenestrelle.
1172-73, Humbert allied with William of Montferrat against Asti.
2/12/1173, Humbert III, Gerard of Macon, Raymond V of Toulouse, and Alfonso II of Aragon met with King Henry II of England at Montferrand in Auvergne. [They soon afterwards all moved to Limoges.] Humbert made an agreement with King Henry to marry his daughter Alice to Henry’s son John. [At this time Humbert had no male heir.]
1173, Humbert claiming the title Lord of Turin, Cavoretto and Collegno, and to possess the homage of the counts of Castellamonte and Canavese.
1174, Humbert, siding with the Pope Alexander III, was deprived of many of his titles in war against Emperor Frederick I.
1175, Humbert married 4th Beatrix.
1176, Humbert, as lord of the city under the Emperor, to have ‘special reserves’ in their favor in a treaty made by the Turinese.
1176, Humbert in conflict with Milo, bishop of Turin; specifically over the destruction of Rivalta castle.
1178, Guy de Chandieu sent by Humbert, count of Savoy, as his ambassador to England to concluded the marriage of Prince John with his daughter. (S) Historic Studies, V1, Read, 1897, P140.
6/1178, ‘Comes Humbertus et socer eius Girardus Viennensis’ are at Belley.
9/1/1181, Pope Lucius III succeeded Pope Alexander III.
10/20/1188, An agreement between the Bishop of Maurienne and the canons of his cathedral names ‘Humberto comite presidente.’
3/4/1189, Humbert died; buried at the Abbaye de Hautecombe.
6/12/1189, ‘Thomas … Mauriannensis comes et marchio Italiæ’ confirmed the donations made by ‘pater meus … [et] domini comitis Humberti … abavi mei’ to the canons of Saint-Jean de Maurienne, with the advice of ‘B. matris mee et … tutore meo Bonifacio marchione Montisferrati.’
4/8/1230, Beatrix died.
(S) Early History of the House of Savoy. (S) Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.

Child of Humbert and Beatrice:
i. Tommaso of Savoy (47277574), born 3/20/1177 in Savoy.

G28: 189110310 Amadeus of Maurienne


189110310. Amadeus III of Maurienne, count of Savoy & 189110311. Adelaide ? & 189110297. Mathilda d’Albon.

1095, Amedee born in Montmelian, Savoi, s/o 756441482. Humbert II, Count of Savoy & 756441483. Gisele de Burgundy.
8/13/1099, Pope Paschal II succeeded Pope Urban II.
10/19/1103, Amadeus’ father died; his mother Gisela became regent.
10/21/1104, ‘Amedeus comes’ donated property to Saint-Jean de Maurienne, for the soul of ‘patris sui Uberti comtis’, with the consent of ‘Gisla matre et fratribus eius Guillelmo atque Umberto.’
1105, Amedee’s mother Gisele married 2nd Raniere Marchese di Moferrate.
5/2/1108, Amadeus’ tutor is Aymon, Count of the Genevois.
1108, Amadeus a benefactor of the daughter house of Abbondance in the valley of New-Chablais.
1109, Amadeus succeeded as Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie.
1/19/1111, A document of Amadeus on crusade.
1111, In Syria at Shaizar, crusader army fought under King Baldwin I of Jerusalem against a Seljuk army.
1111, Henry V, King of Germany, also became the Holy Roman Emperor. [Amadeus’ cousin, Henry’s mother was Bertha of Savoy, paternal grand aunt of Amadeus.]
1111, The emperor recognised Amadeus’ title as Count of the Holy Roman Empire.
1114, Amadeus arranged the marriage of his sister Adelaide to King Louis VI of France.
3/1115 in Paris, King Louis married Adelaide.
1115, ‘Guido Viennensis archiepiscopus’ [Amadeus’ maternal uncle, and future Pope Calixtus II] addressed a letter to ‘nepoti suo Amedeo comiti.’
9/1116, Amadeus restored  the two ‘curtes’ of Leuk and Naters to the bishop of Sion.
1/24/1118, Pope Gelasius II succeeded Paschal II.
2/1/1119, Pope Calixtus II succeeded Gelasius II. [Apparently Amadeus and Pope Calixtus were not on good terms at this time. The Pope traveled through the lands of Amadeus, but did not visit him.]
1120, Emperor Henry V of Germany appealed to ‘consanguineus’ Amadeus ‘marchio’, and Aymon, count of the Genevois, to intervene in favour of the abbey of Romainmotier at the foot of the Jura [north of the lake of Geneva] against Ebal de Granson.
1120-24, Amadeus at war with the Count of the Genevoi.
1124, Amadeus defeated the count at the battle of Col de Tamie. Aymon and Amadeus agreed to the Peace of Seyssel.
1124, Amadeus assumed the title ‘Comes et Marchio.’
12/21/1124, Pope Honorius II succeeded Calixtus II.
1125, Lothar II elected King of the Romans.
1125, Amadeus made a grant to the Great St Bernard hospital. Amadeus’ brothers Humbert, William and Raynald witnessed the grant.
5/14/1129, Amadeus met with ‘Loterio imperatore regnante.’
2/14/1130, Pope Innocent II succeeded Pope Honorius II.
3/1/1131, ‘Amedeus filius quondam Humberti comitis’ confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Santa Maria di Pinerolo.
1131, Viscount Henry of Baratonia in the entourage of Amadeus.
1132, Amadeus a benefactor and approver of the founding of the abbey of Tamie on the borders of Savoy and Genevois. [‘… memoria dignum marchionem Italiae, Sabaudiae et Mauriennae comitem Amedeum.’]
1133, Emperor Lothar II captured Amadeus’ town of Turin. Amadeus submitted to the Emperor.
7/27/1133, Adelaide named in a charter.
7/27/1134, ‘Comes Amedeus … cum uxore sua Adeleida comitissa" confirmed the rights of the monastery of ‘S. Justi in villa Volveria’.
By 1135, Adelaide died.
By 7/1135, Amadeus married 2nd Mathilda, d/o §Guigues, Comte d’Albon.
1136, Amadeus became infludential in the region of St. Maurice.
1/9/1137, ‘A. comes et marchio cum uxore sua M. … et Umbertus eorum filius.’ donated property to the monastery of Ripalta.
7/30/1137, ‘Palatinus Comes Amedeus’ donated property to the monastery of Locedio ‘in terra Willelmi Marchionis fratris sui’. [Amadeus’ uterine brother].
8/1/1137, Amadeus’ brother-in-law King Louis VI died.
1137, Peter, abbot of Cluny, appealed to Amadeus in favor of young King Louis VII; to hold him innocent of transgressions of the royal court.
1137-38, The Abbey of St Sulpice consecrated by Peter, archbishop of Lyons, at the special request of Amadeus.
3/11/1138, Amadeus III [as suzerain, holding ‘placita’ for his vassals] concluded a dispute concering St. Maurice.
1138, Amadeus recovered the town of Turin.
2/28/1139, ‘Amedeus comes et marchio’ donated revenue from Conflens to the archbishop of Tarantasia.
1140, ‘Dominus Amedeus comes et marchio et frater eius Raynaldus’ granted rights to the archbishop of Tarantasia.
1140, Amadeus defeated his brother-in-law Guigues IV, Dauphin of Albon, at the battle of Montmelian [the Dauphin died of his wounds.]
6/23/1142, Count Amadeus requested that the Pope confirm the bounds of the abbey of St. Sulpice.
1143, Amadeus first used the white cross on a red background as the arms of the House of Savoi.
3/30/1143, ‘Amedeus comes et marchio et Maies comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius’ donated property to the monastery of Saint-Maurice.
9/25/1143, Pope Celestine II succeeded Pope Innocent II.
3/9/1144, Pope Lucius II succeeded Pope Celestine II.
2/15/1145, Pope Eugene III succeeded Pope Lucius II.
1145, Count Amadeus in marriage negotiations with King Afonso Henriques of Portugal.
1146, Amadeus raised 11,000 Susian solidi partly by the grant of a charter to S. Guisto de Susa which included the surrender to the abbey of the comital income in the lower Susian valley. [A golden ‘tabula’ set with precious stones was given to Amadeus by St. Maurice to be broken apart as part of the funding.]
3/30/1147, ‘Amedeus comes et marchio et Majes comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius’ confirmed the rights of the monastery of Saint-Maurice d´Agaune.
1147, ‘Amedeus comes et marchio’ confirmed donations to Saint-Sulpice en Bugey, for the soul of ‘filii mei Humberti’.
6/1147, Amadeus left to support his nephew King Louis VII on his crusade. (S) Popes and the Baltic Crusades, 2007, P34.
10/1147, Amadeus reached Constantinople [which King Louis had already left; but Amadeus soon caught up with them.]
12/25/1147, On Christmas day on the coast of modern-day Turkey, encamped by a river, a tremendous storm washed away much of the supplies of the French. They decided to take a route over the mountains to Antioch.
1/4/1148, The crusaders fought in a battle at Laodicea against the Turks.
1/7/1148 in the area of Mount Cadmus, at night, the rear guard which was surrounded and attacked. The French suffered many losses. King Louis decided to return to his water route.
1/20/1148, After additional battles, the crusaders reached Atalya. There was not enough money for ships for everyone, and King Louis left 7000 infantry in Satalia, Greece [who were never seen again.]
3/19/1148, The crusaders reached Antioch.
6/24/1148 at Acre, at a High Court of Jerusalem, King Louis, Emperor Conrad III, and Baldwin, King of Jerusalem met. The Council decided that the best move in defense of the holy lands would be to retake Damascus.
1148, At Damascus, due to heat, lack of water, and disagreements on plans, the seige failed after 4 days. King Louis sent most of the forces back.
8/30/1148, Amadeus died at Nicosia.
(S) Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. (S) Early History of the House of Savoy.
Family notes:
·         Undated: ‘Amedeus … comes et fratres mei, unacum genitrice nostra Gisla’ donated property to the church of Belley for the soul of ‘patris nostri Humberti comitis’.]

Child of Amadeus and Adelaide:
i. Mafalda of Savoy (94555155) born 1125 in Savoy.
Child of Amadeus and Mathilda:
i. Humbert III of Savoy (94555148) born 8/4/1136 in Savoy.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

G29: 378220624 Galacia-Castile


378220624. Count Raymond of Galicia & 378220625. Urraca of Castile

1070, Raymond born in Amous, Burgundy, younger s/o §William I, Count of Burgundy.
1081, Urraca born in Castile, d/o 756441250. Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon & 7564412451. Constance of Burgundy.
1086, ‘Wilelmus comes Burgundie’ names ‘Rainaldi et Raimundi filiorum meorum’ in his donation to Cluny. (S) FMG.
1086, Raymond, to finance his crusade, donated to the archbishopric of Besancon [Hugh is brother the bishop] much of his property for 7000 solidi. [Raymond admitted most of the property was ill-obtained, and relinquished it for the good of his soul.]
11/1086, Raymond participated in the expedition of his brother-in-law Eudes I, duke of Burgundy, to reconqueror Muslim held territories in support of Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon, but arrived too late to help. During this time, Raymond and Eudes visited Eudes’ aunt Constance of Burgundy.
4/25/1087, Count Raimundo a witness to a grant of Alfonso VI to the clergy of Astorga cathedral.
8/1087, Raymond at the unsuccessful attack on Tudela. (S) FMG.
[–––Raimond & Urraca–––]
1087, Raymond betrothed to Urraca.
11/12/1087, Raymon’s father died.
1087-88, Lisbon and Sintra, lost to invading Murabit from north Africa. Raymond gathered forces in an attempt to retake the lands; but was defeated in battle close to Lisbon.
1/28/1090, ‘Adefonsus rex Legionis et totius Hispanie imperator atque Fredenandi filius regis’ granted privileges to Santiago de Compostela, with the advice of ‘generis mei comitis domini Raimundi’. (S) FMG.
1090, Raymond married Urraca, was designated the heir of Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon, and was installed in Santiago as Count and Countess of Galacia. [About the same time, Raymond’s brother Guy, future Pope Calixtus II, became archbishop of Vienne.]
By 1092, ‘Raymundus … Burgundie comes filius Willermi … comitis’ donated property to Saint-Bénigne de Dijon. (S) FMG.
1092, Raymond and Urraca took control of the government of Galacia.
5/1/1092, ‘Raymondus gener regis’ confirmed the donation by ‘Adefonsus … Hispaniarum rex … cum coniuge mea Constantia regina’ of property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña. (S) FMG.
1092, Raymond secured the see of Santiago for Dalmatius, a Cluniac monk.
1093, Urraca’s mother died; and Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon had a son Sancho by a mistress [nullifying his commitment to Raymond as his heir.]
5/1093, Raymond, Conde de Galicia y Coimbra, was transferred the cities of Lisbon, Santarem and Cintra. (S) FMG.
5/1092-1/93, Raymond married Urraca. (S) FMG.
2/1094, Raymond in a document of Alfonso VI named as ‘Count of Coimbra and all Galicia.’
1094, Diego Gelmirez became the notary of Count Raymond of Galacia. (S) Key Figures in Medieval Europe, Emmerson, 2006, P245.
1094-5, Alfonso VI combined the fiefs of Coimbra and Oporto, south of the Minho river, into one county and gave it to Henri of Burgundy, who was married to his illegitimate daughter Tarasia. [Future Portugal. This likely ended the pact between Raymond and Henri.]
12/1094-7/1095, Raymond made an agreement with his cousin Count Henri of Burgundy for support, under which Henri would be given Toledo on Raymon’s succession to Leon.
12/5/1095, The Pope took the see of Santigo under his direct control. [8 days later the Bishop died and the see became vacant.]
10/9/1096, Pelayo Xemeniz donated land ‘en Ville Ceide’ to the monastery of San Salvador, … ‘Sanxus comes in Toro et alius comes domino Ancricco in Auctario de Selles, comes Remundus tenente in Coria et in Zamora.’ (S) FMG.
1/19/1097, Brabolio Gutierrez sold land ‘en territorio de León las villas Cubillas’ to ‘Ordoño Sarraciniz y a su mujer Fronilde Ovéquiz’, … ‘comes Raimundus in Galicia et in Zamora.’ (S) FMG.
1/1098, Raymond styled ‘Conde de Grajal.’ (S) FMG.
4/7/1098, In a document of Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon: ‘Reimundus totius Gallecie comes regisque gener.’ (S) Curia and Cortes in Leon and Castile, Procter, 1980, P15.
8/13/1099, Pope Paschal II succeeded Urban II.
1/25/1100, ‘Adefonsus … Toletani imperii rex’ donated the churches of ‘Sancti Facundi et Sancti Primitivi … in vita sua dederam uxori mee Berte regine’, to Cluny, confirmed by ‘Raimundus totius Gallecie comes et gener regis, Urraca soror regis, Urraca regis filia et Raimundi comitis uxor, Enricus Portugalensis comes, uxor ipsius Tarasia filia regis.’
1100, Raymond secured the election of his fried Diego Gelmirez  as Bishop of Compostela. [Consecrated 4/21/1101.]
1100, ‘Raimundus comes frater comitis Stephani’ donated property to Cluny. (S) FMG.
1102, Raymond established his principal stronghold at the castle of Grajal. (S) FMG.
3/23/1103, ‘Waracta filia imperatoris Fernandi … Urraca regis filia et Reimundi comiti uxor …’ subscribed the charter under which ‘Adefonsus totius Ispanie imperator’ donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña with the consent of ‘uxoris mee Helisabet regine’. (S) FMG.
9/1107, Raymond died; Queen Urraca succeeding as regent. The magnates of Spain gave an oath of support to Urraca and her son. Raimond buried at the Cathedral Santiago el Mayor, Santiago de Compostela.
[–––Urraca–––]
12/18/1107, ‘Infanta dna Urraca Adefonsi imperatoris filia et totius Gallecie domina’ the monastery of San Andrés de Trobo to Santiago de Compostela by charter. (S) FMG.
12/1107 at Leon, Alfonso VI called a council of Galician magnates to review his succession in Galacia. Since Count Raymond had died, Alfonso wanted his son to succeed rather than the son of his daughter Urraca; who could rule as regent unless she remarried. [At the council Guy of Burgundy and Diego Gelmirez named as Urraca’s son’s guardians.]
5/1108, Urraca’s half-brother Sancho, her father’s heir, died in battle.
1108, Urraca’s father declared her the heiress to Castile. (S) FMG.
7/1/1109, Urraca’s father died; Uracca succeeding as Urraca I of Castile and Leon.
1109, Count Henri of Portugal invaded Leon, claiming the right of his wife Tarasia [starting a civil war that would last 5 years.]
8/1109, Urraca lost Toledo to the Almoravides.
12/1109, Urraca married Alfonso I of Aragon [the ‘Battler’, who seized most of her lands. Alfonso I, 2nd s/o Sancho Ramirez, King of Aragon and Navarre, would die without children, his heir being his younger brother Ramiro II of Aragon, father of Petronilla of Aragon, mother of Alfonso II of Aragon.] Many wanted her to marry Count Gomez Gonzalez.
10/26/1110, Count Henri supported Alfonso I of Aragon in the defeat of Queen Urraca’s forces at the battle of Candespina.
11/1110, Queen Urraca convinced Count Henri to switch sides.
12/1110, Count Henri joined Urraca in besieging Alfonso I of Aragon at Penafiel.
2/1111, Count Henri met with Urraca of Leon at Palencia over partioning of her possessions [which she did not keep.]
1111, Urraca appealed to Rome for an annulment of her marriage on the grounds of a common ancestor, which was granted; but not accepted by Alfonso of Aragon.
1111, Alfonso, the son, age 6, became King of Galicia in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.
1111, Pedro Arias led an unsuccessful insurrection against Uracca and he son Alfonso.
5/1112, Count Henri of Portugal died; but his wife Tarasia would continue the conflict for lands in Leon.
5/14/1112, ‘Urraca totius Yspanie regina’ confirmed the donation of the monastery of San Andrés de Trobo to Santiago de Compostela. (S) FMG.
1112, Urraca became aligned with Pedro Gonzalez de Lara, who “displayed undue private faliliarity with the Queen.” (S) The Lara Family, Doubleday, 2001, P21. [Pedro and Urraca had a son and daughter, but did not marry.]
1113, Queen Urraca vied [successfully] with her half-sister Tarasia [Teresa] of Portugal, widow of Count Henri, for control of Leon-Castile.
6/1113 at Burgos, A sermon by Diego Gelmirez, archbishop of Compostela, recalled the glories of Spain under Alfonso VI; and said that since his death, under Queen Urraca and her son ecclesiastical rights had been violated, magnates of Spain reduced to impotence … the rest of Spain dominated by a few.
1114, Alfonso I of Aragon accepted a papal nullification of the marriage with Urraca. (S) Two Cities, Barber, 2004, P321.
10/1114, at Leon, In a Synod, traitors and perjurers were condemned [adopted by Bishop Diego Gelmirez a few weeks later.]
3/22/1115, Urraca issued the first of multiple diplomas witnessed by Rodrigo Gonzalez [comital title in 1121]. (S) The Lara Family, Doubleday, 2001, P143.
1115, Urraca allied herself with the townspeople of Santiago when Bishop Glemirez and Pedro Froilaz, count of Traba, attempted to make Alfonso I of Aragon king of Galacia.
12/25/1115, Urraca held her Christmas court at Leon.
1116, Pope Paschal II helped Urraca quell a revolt led by Menendo Nunez at Sahagun.
1116, Urraca had re-established control over most of Castile.
1116, Urraca granted donations to several monasteries; and toured her territories with her son Alfonso.
2/1117, at the council of Burgos, The consanguineous relationship that existed between Urraca and Alfonso I of Aragon was defined and accepted by both parties. A truce was created under which Alfonso kept his conquests in Castile, and Urraca kept hers in Vizcaya and Rioja.
1117, Queen Urraca finally won a long struggle for the allegiance of the people of Sahagun.
6/1117, Urraca and Bishop Diego besieged in the tower of the cathedral of Copostela, but escaped outside the city. The people eventually turned on the rebel leaders; whose property was confiscated.
1117, By the truce of the Council of Burgos, war between Castile and Aragon ended. Urraca granted her son Alfonso Toledo and the trans-Duero.
1/24/1118, Pope Gelasius II succeeded Paschal II.
By 5/1118, Urraca had severed relations with Alfonso the Battler. (S) History of Medieval Spain, O’Callaghan, 1975, P220.
2/1/1119, Pope Calixtus II succeeded Gelasius II. [Calixtus the brother of Raymond of Galicia.]
3/26/1119, ‘Urracha … Ispanie regina, regis Aldefonsi regineque Constantie filia’ donated property to the abbey of Silos. (S) FMG.
1119, During a revolt, Queen Urraca besieged at Leon. (S) Women in World History, Commire, 2001, P743.
3/20/1120, Pope Calixtus wrote a letter to the bishops, princes, counts, and knights of Spain in support of the rule of Alfonso, and against his mother Urraca.
1120, Urraca arrested Archbishop Gelmirez. [Alfonso appealed to the Pope to not have her excommunicated.]
8/21/1120, ‘Urraka … Ispanie regina, regis Adefonis regineque Constancie filia’ donated ‘ecclesiam Sancti Nicholai … in Villa Franca’ to Cluny. (S) FMG.
4/13/1121, ‘Urraca totius Ispanie regina et Aldefonsi imperatoris filia’ donated property to the abbey of Silos. (S) FMG.
1121, Urraca raised an army to invade Galicia. Urraca captured her half-sister Tarasia, but released her at the request of Bishop Gelmires and the archbishop of Braga. A final peace agreement was made between them.
10/7/1121, Pope Calixtus dispatched 5 letters ordering Urraca to free the archbishop and return all his property. (S) Calixtus II, Stroll, 2004, P259.
1123, Queen Urraca exerted her personal control by imprisoning the powerful Count Pedro Froilaz and isolating Gelmirez.
5/18/1123, Dona Urraco generated a charter witnessed by abbot Lopez Ferreiro, Iglesia de Santiago III.
11/1123, Urraca acknowledged her ‘bastard’ son, ‘Frenandus Petri minor filius’.
1124, Urraca reconquered Siguenza, Atienza, and Medinaceli.
12/21/1124, Pope Honorius II succeeded Calixtus II.
4/2/1125, On the death of Archbishop Bernard of Toledo, Alfonso and Queen Urraca wrote to Archbishop Gelmirez to warn him against taking advantage of Bernard’s death.
7/21/1125, Urraca issued a charter to the monastery of Silos. (S) The Kingdom of Leon-Castilla Under King Alfonso VII, Reilly, 1998, P326.
3/10/1126, Urraca died; buried in the monastery of San Isidro, Leon.
(S) The Kingdom of Leon-Castilla Under King Alfonso VII, Reilly, 1998. (S) Crisis of the 12th Century, Bisson, 2009. (S) Birth of the Chess Queen, Yalom, 2005. (S) Calixtus II, Stroll, 2004. (S) Medieval Iberia, Gerli, 2003, P186. (S) Portugal, Livermore, 2004, P12.

Child of Raymond and Urraca:
i. Alfonso VII of Spain (189110312), born 3/1/1105 in Spain. 

Monday, April 15, 2013

G28: 189110308 Burgundy-Bierzo


189110308. Henri of Burgundy, Count of Portugal & 189110309. Tarasia of Bierzo

1069, Henri born in Burgundy, s/o 1512945948. Henri le Damoiseau de Bourgogne & 1512945949. Sibylla de Barcelona.
By 1074, Henri’s father died.
1078-9, Tarasia born in Castile, illegimitate d/o 756441248. Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon & 756441249. doña Jimena Muñoz de Guzmán.
1080-3, ‘Odo dux Burgundie’ donated the village of Marcenay to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of ‘omnes eius fratres et sorores Robertus, Henricus, Beatrix, Helia.’
1081-84, ‘Heynricus frater meus’ witnessed the donation to Cluny of ‘Oddo dux Burgundie’.
1087, Eudes, duke of Burgundy, fought the Moors in Spain accompanied by his brothers Robert and Henri.
1093, Henri styled ‘Senor de Braga.’
1094, Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon combined the fiefs of Coimbra and Oporto, south of the Minho river, into one county and gave it to Henri of Burgundy, who was married to his illegitimate daughter Tarasia. [Future Portugal.]
12/1094-7/1095, Raymond of Galacia made an agreement with his cousin Count Henri of Burgundy for support, under which Henri would be given Toledo on Raymon’s succession to Leon. [Raymond betrothed to Urraca, d/o Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon, who did not have a male heir. Urraca and Tarasia were half-sisters.]
1095-96, Henri and Tarasia occupied the castle at Guimares.
1096, Henri named count of Portugal.
1096, ‘Comite Dono Henrico ... cum uxore mea Infante Dona Taraxea’ granted privileges to ‘Villa Constantin de Panonias’, confirmed by ‘Infans Dono Alfoso filius Henrici comiti et uxor mea Infante Dona Taraxia’, by charter.
1096-97, Henri styled ‘Count’ in Tordesillas.
1097-98, Henri and Teresa made a pilgrimage to Santiago.
3/14/1099, ‘Taraxia Adefonsi regis filia … Henrik comes …’ subscribed the charter under which Alfonso VI King of Castile donated the monastery of Santa María de Algadefe to the monastery of Eslonza.
4/7/1098, In a document of Alfonso VI of Castile and Leon: ‘Henricus Portugalensis provincie comes regisque gener.’ (S) Curia and Cortes in Leon and Castile, Procter, 1980, P15.
8/13/1099, Pope Paschal II succeeded Urban II.
1/25/1100, ‘Adefonsus … Toletani imperii rex’ donated the churches of ‘Sancti Facundi et Sancti Primitivi … in vita sua dederam uxori mee Berte regine’, to Cluny, confirmed by ‘Raimundus totius Gallecie comes et gener regis, Urraca soror regis, Urraca regis filia et Raimundi comitis uxor, Enricus Portugalensis comes, uxor ipsius Tarasia filia regis.’
3/1100, ‘Comes domnus Henricus et uxor mea Domna Theresia, domini Regis Alfonsi filia’ donated property to La Charité-sur-Loire by charter.
9/16/1100, Count Henri led an expedition in the service of Alfonso VI, and was defeated at Malagon near Ciudad Real.
By 6/8/1101, Henri took the cross of a crusader.
1103, Count Henri left for Rome; but the crusade never materialized.
By 7/1103, Henri had returned to Portugal.
1107, Raymond of Galacia died; his wife Urraca succeeding as regent for their son.
12/1107 at Leon, Alfonso VI called a council of Galician magnates to review his succession in Galacia. Since Count Raymond had died, Alfonso wanted his son to succeed rather than the son of his daughter Urraca; who could rule as regent unless she remarried.
7/1109, Count Henri suppressed a revolt of the Moors of Sintra.
7/1/1109, Urraca of Galacia succeeded her father in Castile-Leon.
1109, Count Henri of Portugal invaded Leon, claiming the right of his wife Tarasia [starting a civil war that would last 5 years.]
1110, Count Henri attempted to raise additional forces in France, where he was captured and imprisoned for a short time.
10/26/1110, Count Henri supported Alfonso I of Aragon in the defeat of Queen Urraca’s forces at the battle of Candespina.
11/1110, Queen Urraca convinced Count Henri to switch sides.
12/1110, Count Henri joined Urraca in besieging Alfonso I of Aragon at Penafiel.
2/1111, Count Henri met with Urraca of Leon at Palencia over partioning of her possessions [which she did not keep.]
1111, Count Henri participated in the insurrection against Urraca and Alfonso I of Aragon at the unsuccessful siege of Carrion.
5/1111, Count Henri had to return to Portugal because of internal troubles.
5/1112, Count Henri died at the battle of Astorga, Leon; buried at Braga Cathedral; Tarasia would continue the conflict for lands in Leon.
1112, Theresa named regent for her son Alfonso Henriques.
1113, Queen Urraca vied [successfully] with her half-sister Tarasia [Teresa] of Portugal, widow of Count Henri, for control of Leon-Castile.
1116, Theresa pursuaded by Bishop Gelmires of Santiago to extend her northern frontier. Theresa attacked and seized Tuy and Orense.
1117, Theresa besieged by Mohammedans in Coimbra.
11/1117, Teresa styled herself ‘Teresa Queen of Portugal.’
1/24/1118, Pope Gelasius II succeeded Paschal II.
2/1/1119, Pope Calixtus II succeeded Gelasius II. [Calixtus the brother of Raymond of Galicia.]
1120, Countess Teresa created a conflict with the church by subjecting the whole of the burgh of Oporto to the authority of the Bishop.
2/1/1121, A charter of Teresa is confirmed by Fernando Peres de Trava [her future lover.]
1121, Urraca raised an army to invade Galicia. Urraca captured her half-sister Tarasia at the castle of Lanhoso, but released her at the request of Bishop Gelmires and the archbishop of Braga. A final peace agreement was made between them.
7/1121, Paio Mendes, bishop of Braga, fled from Teresa and took refuge with Urraca in Zamora.
1123-24, Theresa took a lover, Fernando Peres de Trava, and made him governor of Oporto and Coimbra.
12/21/1124, Pope Honorius II succeeded Calixtus II.
3/10/1126, Teresa’s half-sister Urraca died. Her son Alfonso VII signed a provisional peace treaty with D. Teresa and Fernando Peres.
5/23/1127, ‘Tarasia regina domni Adefonsi Yspaniarum imperatoris filia’ donated ‘monasterio Sancte Marie quod cognomento Viminerium’ to Cluny by charter.
1127, Alfonso VII of Leon and Castile invaded Portugal and forced Theresa to recognize his supremacy.
1127, Theresa’s son refused to recognize her submission and rebelled with the help of Archbishop Paio of Braga.
3/31/1128, Afonso and his mother Theresa are both signatories of the same document.
7/24/1128, Theresa, mother of Afonso, and Fernando Peres, her lover, taken prisoner at the battle of San Mamede near Guimarais by Alfonso Henriques.
1128, Theresa's mother died.
1129-30, Theresa gave up all rights to the rule of Portugal. The pope tried to arrange for her release through the Bishop of Coimbra, and a papal Cardinal. Afonso refused and was excommunicated. After threatening to kill the Cardinal, Afonso released his mother and was not excommunicated.
11/1/1130, ‘Regina Donna Tarasia mater Donni Alfonsi … anno secundo regni’ died in Galacia; buried at Braga Cathedral.
(S) Encyclopedia Britannica, V19, 1894, P555. (S) Medieval Iberia, Gerli, 2003, P186. (S) Portugal, Livermore, 2004, P12. (S) Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.

Child of Henri and Tarasia:
i. Alfonso Henriques I (94555154) born 7/25/1109-12 in Portugal.

G29: 94555154 King Alfonso Henriques I of Portugal


94555154. King Alfonso Henriques I of Portugal & 94555155. Mafalda of Savoy

7/25/1109-12, Alfonso Henriques born in Portugal, s/o 189110308. Henri of Burgundy, count of Portugal & 189110309. Tarasia of Bierzo.
5/1112, Alfonso’s father died.
1112, Alfonso’s mother Theresa named his regent.
1/24/1118, Pope Gelasius II succeeded Paschal II.
2/1/1119, Pope Calixtus II succeeded Gelasius II. [Calixtus the brother of Raymond of Galicia.]
1120, Infante Don Afonso Henriques of Portugal in the confirmation of a document.
12/21/1124, Pope Honorius II succeeded Calixtus II.
5/1125, Afonso knighted at the cathedral of Zamora.
1125, Mafalda born, d/o 189110310. Amadeus of Maurienne, count of Savoy & 189110311. Adelaide ?.
5/23/1127, ‘Tarasia regina domni Adefonsi Yspaniarum imperatoris filia’ donated ‘monasterio Sancte Marie quod cognomento Viminerium’ to Cluny by charter.
1127, Alfonso VII of Leon and Castile invaded Portugal and forced Alfonso’s mother, Theresa, to recognize his supremacy.
1127, Alfonso Henriques refused to recognize her submission and rebelled with the help of Archbishop Paio of Braga.
9/7/1127, A donation of Alfonso VII King of Toledo and Leon, declares of Afonso Henriques: ‘imperante portucalis adefonsus filius henrici comes.’
1127, Afonso given the castles of Neiva and Lima.
11/13/1127, ‘Infanta dna Sancia, Infans dns Adefonsus regis consanguineus’ subscribed the charter under which King Alfonso VII donated ‘el castillo de San Jorge en la Sierra del Pindo’ to Santiago de Compostela.
3/31/1128, Afonso and his mother Theresa are both signatories of the same document.
4/27/1128, Afonso confirmed without his mother’s signature the charter of Guimarais of his father.
1128, Afonso holding territory north of the Douro. Teresa still held the lands south of the river.
5/26/1128, Afonso confirmed a previous privilege of Paio Mendes, archbishop of Braga, naming him chaplain and promising to cede him the city of Braga.
7/24/1128, Theresa, mother of Afonso, and Fernando Peres, her lover, taken prisoner at the battle of San Mamede near Guimarais by Alfonso Henriques. Afonso’s Portugal now extended southward to Coimbra.
3/18/1129, Charter document of Afonso Henriques.
1129-30, Theresa gave up all rights to the rule of Portugal. The pope tried to arrange for her release through the Bishop of Coimbra, and a papal Cardinal. Afonso refused and was excommunicated. After threatening to kill the Cardinal, Afonso released his mother and was not excommunicated.
1/15/1130, Charter document of Afonso Henriques.
1130, Alfonso’s mother died.
1130s, Expansion was possible to the north into Galacia, or south into Muslim territory. Afonso initially went north, taking Tuy and other fortresses.
1135, Afonso built the castle of Leiria as a defensive base of operations in the south; a strong fortress with a sheer cliff on one side.
1135, Afonso, ‘Prince of Portugal’, refused to do homage to Alfonso VII of Castile.
1136, Alfonso Henriques captured the castle of Ourem from the Moors.
1136, Afonso Henriques replaced deceased Bishop Hugo of Oporto with Joao Peculiar [who became archbishop of Braga in 1138.]
1137, Muslims attacked Afonso’s castle at Leiria; killing 250 of the garrison.
1137, Afonso made peace with Alfonso VII of Spain [Peace of Tuy], and focused on extending his lands to the south.
7/25/1139, Afonso won his 1st victory over the Muslims at Campo-Ourique.
1139, Alfonso declared himself King of Portugal, and “a knight of Blessed Peter and of the Roman Pontiff”; and promised to pay 4 ounces of gold annually for papal protection.
4/1140, In a document of Afonso styled: ‘rex Alfonsus.’
1140, Afonso and Alfonso VII of Spain made an agreement over the towns of Tuy and Val-de-Vez.
1140, Afonso attacked Galicia through Tuy and entered Torono. Alfonso VII retaliated by marching on Vez. At the castle of Penha da Rainha, the two armies met. A tournament was conducted with Afonso’s side winning and capturing Afonso’s brother-in-law and Bermudo Peres, brother of the Emperor. Afterwards, prisoners and castles were exchanged.
1140-42, Afonso, with the help of a fleet of crusaders from northern Europe, made an unsuccessful attacked on Lisbon.
1142, Afonso built the outpost of Germanelo near Penela; beyond which was Muslim territory.
1143, Alfonso Henriques, King of Portugal, recognized as a vassal of Alfonso VII of Spain.
12/13/1143, Afonso received papal approval for his independence from Spain.
1144, Pope Lucius II wrote to Afonso Henriques, addressed as ‘Portugalensium dux’, accepting the proferred tribute and extending protection.
1144, Afonso rebuilt and garrisoned the castle of Leiria [for the 3rd time.]
2/15/1145, Pope Eugene III succeeded Pope Lucius II.
1145, Afonso allowed his sister and her husband, Fernao Mendes of Braganca, to give the Templars the castle of Longroiva.
7/1145, ‘Alfonsus, Portugaliæ rex, comitis Henrici et reginæ Theresiæ filius, magni quoque regis Alfonsi nepos … cum uxore mea regina donna Malfada, filia comitis Amedei de Moriana’ confirmed donations to La Charité-sur-Loire by his father.
1-6/1146, Afonso married his cousin Mafalda. ‘Rex Donnus Alfonsus’ and ‘Donnam Matildam, Comitis Amadæi de Moriana filiam.’
1146, Charter of Alfonso … ‘anno ... quo duxeramt Mahaldam.’
7/1146, A donation made ‘cum uxore mea Regina Dona Mafalda.’
3/15/1147, Afonso seized Santarem, on the Tagus river north of Lisbon. Preparations for the attack were made under concealment the night before.
6/28/1147, Afonso allied himself with another group of crusaders from northern Europe; guaranteeing them the plunder of Lisbon and the ransom of the captives. Afonso also had the support of the Archbishop of Braga.
10/24/1147, Lisbon [al-Ushbuna] fell to Afonso and the crusaders. [The capture of Lisbon is said to as important as the capture of Toledo in 1085, and the capture of Zaragoza in 1118.]
4/1148, Mafalda’s father died on crusade in Nicosia, Cyprus.
1148, Alfonso gave the Templars the castle of Cera on the banks of the river Tomar.
10/1/1149, In a document of Afonso styled: ‘Alphonsus glorioissimus princeps et Dei gratia Portugalensium rex.’
1151, Afonso planned an attack on Alcacer.
1152, Afonso repulsed at Alcacer-do-Sal.
7/8/1153, Pope Anastasius IV succeeded Pope Eugene III.
1154, Afonso gave a charter to the inhabitants of the castle at Sintra.
1154, Muslim map-maker Edrisi prepared a map for Roger II of Sicily of the world that had details of Portugal. (S) Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, Diffie, 1977, P14.
12/4/1154, Pope Adrian IV succeeded Pope Anastasius IV.
8/21/1157, Fernando II succeeded as King of Leon-Castile.
1158, Afonso captured Alcacer do Sal in the Alentejo south of the Tagus river, of great military importance.
1158, Afonso Henriquez establish the military order of Aviz at Evora. (S) Portugal Illustrated, Kinsey, 1828, P478.
9/1158, Fernando II of Leon [Alfonso’s future son-in-law] compensated Pelayo Curvo for devastation caused by Alfonso, King of Portugal.
By 4/1157, Afonso and his wife Matilda, who commanded the establishment of the charter, made an anticipatory grant of the churches in Portugal; accepted by Hugh of Martonio, a Templar knight. (S) The Templars, Barber, 2002, P132.
11/4/1157, Mafalda died; buried at the Church of the Cross, Coimbra.
9/7/1159, Pope Alexander III succeeded Pope Adrian IV.
1160, Fernando II of Leon founded the city of Ciudad Rodrigo on the Portuguese border.
1160, Afonso establish the Templars at Tomar. (S) Portugal, A Traveller’s History, Livermore, 2004, P52.
12/1160 at Celanova, Fernando II of Leon met with Alfonso Henriques and sealed a marriage agreement of Fernando II and Alfonso’s daughter Urraca.
1161, Afonso suffered a defeat against the Moors.
1162, Afonso’s lieutenant Geraldo Sem-Pavor captured Evora.
1163, Alfonso occupied for a short time the town of Salamanca in Leon.
1165-66, Afonso’s knight Giraldo Sempavor captured, Trujillo, Caceres, Montanchez, Serpa [1166] and Juromenha between the Tagus and Guadiana on his behalf.
1166, Afonso granted a charter to Evora in which rights were given to Muslims and Jews as well as Christians. Every man with a house, a yoke of oxen, 40 sheep and an ass, and 2 beds was also obliged to turn out for military service. If there was a brawl among the villagers, the woulds would be taxed. (S) Cadogan Guides Portugal, Evans, 2004, P397.
1167, Fernando II of Leon and Alfonso Henriques in battle over the city of Ciudad Rodrigo. Alfonso’s son Sancho led the attack on the city. Fernando’s forces won the battle. Fernando captured many of Alfonso’s men, but later freed them.
1168, Afonso founded the Cistercian Mosteiro de Salzedas.
5/1169, Afonso came to the aid of Giraldo Sempavor in the capture of the citadel of Badajoz. Afonso broke his leg during the battle and was only able to ride a horse with difficulty. Fernando II of Leon, of whom the Muslims held the city as his vassal, attacked and freed the city; captured Afonso; and demanded the surrender of Montanchez and Trujillo.
1169, Afonso granted a charter to Linhares da Beria.
1170, Alfonso loses to the Moors at Alemtejo.
8/1170, Afonso knighted his son Sancho at Coimbra.
1171, Afonso defended Santarem, which was surrounded, against the Almohad led by Aby Ya’qub. The Muslims broke the siege when they heard of the approach of Fernando II of Leon and his army.
1171, Afonso instituted the military Order da Ala de S. Miguel.
1171-72, Alfonso Henriques went to Lafoes on the Vouga to retire, turning his government over to his son Sancho.
1172, Afonso made a truce with the Muslims.
1173, Afonso Henriques had the remains of St. Vincent moved from Cabo de Sao Vicente to Lisbon. (S) Rough Guide to Portugal, Fisher, 2010, P528.
1174, Giraldo Sempavor, knight of Afonso, beheaded by the Almohads.
1177, Alfonso hosted crusaders bound for the Holy Land at Lisbon, including Philip of Alsace [who was eventually betrothed to Alfonso’s daughter Teresa.]
1177, Afonso established the military order of St. James of the Sword in Portugal [established by Pope Alexander III in 1175.]
1178, Afonso began construction of the Cistercian Mosteiro de Santa Maria at Alcobaca.
1178, The truce with the Muslims was broken when Afonso’s son Sancho made an expedition into Muslim territory, reaching Seville.
5/23/1179, Pope Alexander III wrote of Afonso: “he protected the whole of Portugal with his sword”; for which the Pope acknowledged “the intrepid destroyer of the enemies of the Christian name and the energetic defender of the Christian faith” as “rex Portugalensium”; thereby confirming Portuguese independence.
7/15/1180, An Almohad fleet attacked Lisbon, but was defeated off Cape Espiches by a Portuguese fleet under the command of Fuas Roupinho.
9/1/1181, Pope Lucius III succeeded Pope Alexander III.
1184, Afonso Henriques attacked the forces besieging Santarem, Caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf; who was mortally wounded in the battle. [Afonso’s son Sancho attacked from within the city. The Muslims were caught between the two forces.]
12/8/1185, Alfonso died [having doubled the size of Portugal in wars against the Moors]; buried in the Church of the Cross, Coimbra.
1196, ‘Regina D. Matilda … Comitis Amadæi filia, uxor D. Alfonsi Portugallensium Regis’, died.
(S) History of Medieval Spain, O’Callaghan, 1975. (S) Medieval Iberia, Gerli, 2003. (S) History of Portugal, 1937. (S) Historian’s History, V10, 1907, P636. (S) Curia and Cortes in Leon, Procter, 1980. (S) Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.

Children of Alfonso and Malfada:
i. Urraca of Portugal (47277577), born ~1150 in Portugal.
ii. Sancho I of Portugal, born ~1152 in Portugal.

1174, Sancho, ‘the city builder’, married Dulce; d/o Count Ramon Berenguer IV of Barcelona & Petronilla of Aragon.
1183, Sancho captured a Muslim stronghold in the Algarve after which he styled himself ‘Dei Gratia Portugalie, Silvii et Algarbi Rex.’
3/26/1212, Sancho died; buried in the Church of the Cross, Coimbra.
Children: Afonso II [died 1223]; Fernando, married Joan of Constantinople, d/o Emperor Baldwin of Constantinople; Saint Teresa [1178-1250]; Saint Sanchia [1182-1229]; and Saint Mafalda [1204-1252.]

iii. Teresa of Portugal, born 1157 in Portugal.

8/1183, Teresa married to Philip of Alsace.
8/1/1191, Philip died on crusade.
2/1194, Teresa married Eudes [Odo] III, duke of Burgundy.
1195, Teresa divorced from Eudes on grounds of consanguinity.
5/6/1218, Teresa drowned in a marsh near Furness, Flanders; buried at the Abbaye of Clairvaux, Jura.

Followers