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Monday, June 14, 2010

Sir Paon de Roet

1477426. Sir Paon de Roet

~1300, Payn, baptized ‘Gilles’, born in Le Roeulx, Hainault [Belgium], s/o §Jean de Roët, s/o §Huon de Roët.

1305, Paon heir to his father.

8/1324, King Edward II began the “War of Saint-Sardos” with his brother-in-law King Charles of France, who had invaded Aquitaine.

3/1325, Queen Isabella sent to France to negotiate with her brother, King Charles IV. [King Edward and Queen Isabella’s relationship was stained at this time. She would refuse to return to England, giving multiple excuses to King Edward. While in France, Queen Isabella began an affair with exiled Roger de Mortimer.]

9/12/1325 sailing from Dover, Edward, age 12, sent by his father to his mother to do homage to King Charles IV for his French lands. [Here is where future Edward III would make connections with his mother’s French supporters.]

1326, Queen Isabella traveled to Hainault where she found support from Count William of Hainaut. [William’s daughter Philippa would marry Isabel’s son Edward.] (S) The Political Hist. of England, Poole, 1905, P298.

9/24/1326, Roger de Mortimer and Queen Isabella invaded England, landing at Ipswich with 700 soldiers. Fastre de Roet accompanied John of Beaumont [younger brother of Count William of Hainaut], with 300 of the soldiers. [Payn likely related to Fastre, and highly likely in this retinue.]

1/20/1327, King Edward II abdicated in favor of his son.

12/1327, Payn of the entourage of Philippa of Hainaut as she traveled to England to marry King Edward III.

1/24/1328, Paon at the wedding of Philippa and King Edward. After the wedding, besides a few ladies in waiting, only Paon and Walter de Mauney, Philippa’s carving squire, remained in England.

1332, Queen Philippa gave a present to ‘Panetto de Roed, de Hanonia’.

1334, Paon created Guienne King-of-arms. [Guienne a part of the Duchy of Acquitaine.]

1345, On the death of Philippa and Margaret’s older brother, Margaret became soverign Countess of Hainault.

7/12/1346, Paon, with King Edward, landed in an invasion force of 10,000 in Normandy, which marched north plundering the countryside. King Philip VI, with 8,000 horsemen and 4,000 Genoese crossbowmen pursued.

7/26/1346 at Caen, capital of Normandy, Edward’s forces captured the city; and Raoul, Count of Eu, Constable of France, and Jean de Tancarville, Grand Chamberlain of France.

8/26/1346, Battle of Crecy, north of Paris. Edward III vs. Philip VI, heralded the rise of the longbow as the dominant weapon, and also saw the use of the ribauldequin, an early cannon, by the English. The English longbowmen could fire much more quickly than the Genoese, with a killing range of 250 yards.

1346-47, “Sir Panetto de Roët” at the siege of Calais, France.

1347, Paon and Sanse d’Aubrecicout [likely a cousin of Paon], knights of Queen Philippa, escorted the 6 burghers from Calais, France, who had given themselves up as hostages to the Black Prince, and were spared at the request of Walter Mauny and the Queen, to visit her in her chamber.

8/1347, Paon the Marshall of the Household of Queen Philippa.

1349, A year of the Black death, Paon returned to Hainault.

Aft. 7/27/1349, A “noble adolescent, Elizabeth de Roët, daughter of my lord Gilles, called Paonnet, de Roët” was nominated as a prebendary of the Abbey of St. Waudru in Mons by Queen Philippa’s elder sister Margaret, soverign Countess of Hainault and Empress of Germany. [Mons is close to the former Roeulx estates – again showing a possible link to this ancient family – as claimed by Katherine.]

5/11/1350, Paon preparing to accompany Duke Albert, Duke William and Duke Otto, sons of Countess Margaret, on a pilgrimage to the church of St. Martin at Sebourg near Valenciennes.

1351, Paon, Knight Master of the Household of Countess Margaret in Hainault.

12/1351, Paon with Countess Margaret, her lands under attack by her 2nd son William, when she went to England to get support of King Edward III.

[Likely Katherine’s mother died at this time.]

1352, Paon placed his 2-year-old daughter Katherine under the Queen Philippa’s care.

3/1352, Paon returned to Hainault with Countess Margaret.

[1355] Paon died in England, buried in Old St. Pauls’s Cathedral. “Hic jacet Paganus Roet, Miles, Guyenne Rex Armorum, Pater Catherine Ducise Lancastriae.” [Paon’s death date is based upon his lack of appearance in records after 1352; and his son being called to England in 5/1355.]

(S) Mistress of the Monarchy, Weir, 2007.

Family notes:

·         1411, Paon’s grandson Thomas Swinford, s/o Hugh, would pursue claims to lands in Hainault inherited through his mother.

·         The question of Paon’s royal linkage is unresolved; but he did place his 4 children in royal courts – a sign that their marriages were of importance to the royal family, and one daughter, Katherine, was considered marriable by John of Gaunt.

·         St. Waudru was a prestigious and influential abbey linked to the royal family of Hainault. Elizabeth was even accepted as an “adolescent”, not yet of age 13, the normal age for acceptance.

·         Paon’s tomb inscription [from 1631]: “Here lies Paon Roet, soldier, Guienne King of Arms, father of Catherine, Duchess of Lancaster.”

Children of Payn and ?:

i. Elizabeth de Roët, born 1336-37 in England.

Bef. 7/24/1368, Elizabeth died in the convent in Mons.

ii. Walter de Roët, born 1338-39 in England.

1355, Walter initially in the service of the Duke of Albert, s/o Margaret, Countess of Hainault.

5/1355, Walter a Yoeman to the Chamber of the Prince [the Black Prince.]

iii. Katherine de Roët (738713), born ~1350 in Hainault.

iv. Philippa Roët, born ~1352 in England.

5/19/1359 in Berkshire at Reading abbey, Duke John of Gaunt married Blanche Plantagenet. The poet Geoffrey Chaucer was present.

3/1/1360, Geoffrey Chaucer ransomed in France by King Edward III for £16.

7/21/1361, About this time John, Earl of Lancaster, Lincoln and Derby became the patron of Geoffrey Chaucer, the poet, who had served John’s older brother Lionel and his father, and was known to be as associate of Blanche.

2/22/1366, King Edward granted his esquire Geoffrey Chaucer safe conduct to Navarre in Spain. [It is thought he was an envoy to set up John’s travel and eventual invasion of Spain.]

9/2/1366, Philippa, demoiselle of the Queen’s Chamber to Queen Philippa; married Geoffrey Chaucer, a Yeoman of the Chamber of Edward III.

1367, Philippa married to Geoffrey Chaucer.

~1335, Geoffrey Chaucer born in London, England.

5/19/1359 in Berkshire at Reading abbey, Duke John of Gaunt married Blanche Plantagenet. The poet Geoffrey Chaucer was present.

1360, Geoffrey Chaucer came into the service of King Edward III. Serving in the army, Geoffrey captured at the siege of Rheims.

3/1/1360, Geoffrey Chaucer ransomed in France by King Edward III for £16.

7/21/1361, About this time John, Earl of Lancaster, Lincoln and Derby became the patron of Geoffrey Chaucer, the poet, who had served John’s older brother Lionel and his father, and was known to be as associate of Blanche.

2/22/1366, King Edward granted his esquire Geoffrey Chaucer safe conduct to Navarre in Spain. [It is thought he was an envoy to set up John’s travel and eventual invasion of Spain.]

9/2/1366, Philippa, demoiselle of the Queen’s Chamber to Queen Philippa; married Geoffrey Chaucer, a Yeoman of the Chamber of Edward III.

1367, Philippa married to Geoffrey Chaucer.

6/20/1367, King Edward referred to Chaucer as “our beloved yeoman”.

9/12/1368, Blanche died of the plague at Tutbury castle, Staffordshire; buried at St. Paul’s Cathedral. [Chaucer made an elegy, “The Book of the Duchess,” to Blanche after her death.] 

7/26/1369, After Charles V of France rejected the Treaty of Bretigny, Duke John landed at Calais; the 1st time he was given independent command of an English army. [Geoffrey Chaucer was in John’s retinue.]

1370, Chaucer wrote “The Boke of the Duchesse”, in honor of John of Gaunt’s deceased wife.

8/1372, John of Gaunt granted Philippa Chaucer £10 a year.

4/6/1374, John of Gaunt sailed for England. [Soon after returning John granted Chaucer a pitcher of wine every day for life and arranged for him to have a rent-free house in London.]

6/13/1374, John of Gaunt granted Geoffrey Chaucer £10 a year.

6/20/1367, Geoffrey, ‘Valettus’ of the king, granted a pension of 20 marks a year by Edward III.

7/17/1368, Edward III sent Geoffrey, ‘Valettus Camerae Regis’, to France on official business.

5/10/1374, Geoffrey given lifetime, rent-free lease of a property that straddled Aldgate in London by John, Duke of Lancaster. [Geoffrey would soon after be given lucrative offices in London and a pension of £10 yearly.]

6/8/1374, Geoffrey appoint as the comptroller of customs for the port of London.

4-5/1377, Geoffrey Chaucer sent abroad in King Edward III’s service “on secret business.”

4/18/1378, King Richard II converted Geoffrey’s 1374 grant of wine into a monetary grant.

5/1378, William de Coggeshale with Sir John Hawkwood, and the lord of Milan, received Sir Edward de Berkekely and Geoffrey Chaucer [the poet] in Italy as ambassadors of King Richard II of England.

5/4/1380, Geoffrey Chaucer accused of rape. 

5/1380, Cecily Champagne agreed to drop the rape charge. Countess Joan of Kent, widow of the Black Prince, an intermediary in the rape charge of poet Geoffrey Chaucer.

1385, Robert Belknap and poet Geoffrey Chaucer appointed justices of the peace for Kent.

10/1386, Geoffrey Chaucer a MP for Kent in parliament for the famous Scrope-Grosvenor trial. Geoffrey present most of the 71 days, for which he was paid £24 9s.

10/15/1386, Geoffrey gave a deposition during the Scrope-Grosvenor trial.

1387, Philippa, lady to Queen Constance, died in Leon [Spain]; Geoffrey surviving.

1387-1400, Geoffrey wrote ‘The Canterbury Tales.’

7/12/1389-91, Geoffrey a clerk of the King’s Works.

1390, Geoffrey responsible for building the stands for a tournament.

9/1390, Geoffrey robbed while conducting business.

6/22/1391, Geoffrey appointed to the post of Deputy Forester in the royal forest of Petherton Park in North Petherton, Somerset.

1394, Geoffrey granted a pension of £20 yearly by King Richard II.

12/24/1399, Geoffrey leased a residence within the close of Westminster Abbey.

6/5/1400, Geoffrey received a payment for a loan he had granted.

10/25/1400, Geoffrey died in London, [1556, reburied in Poet’s Corner in Westminster Abbey.]

[Family note: 1478, Chaucer’s ‘The Canterbury Tales’ published by Caxton at Westminster.]

(S) The Life and Times of Chaucer, 1977, Alfred A. Knopf.


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