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Monday, December 26, 2011

Regent Oliver de Ingham & Lady Elizabeth la Zouche

30422630. Regent Oliver de Ingham  & 30422631. Lady Elizabeth la Zouche

1286, Oliver born in Ingham, Norfolk, England, s/o 60845260. Sir John de Ingham & 60845261. Lady Margery ?.

~1297, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 30421150. Lord William la Zouche & 30421151. Matilda Danet.

7/7/1307, Edward II succeeded Edward I as King of England.

4/1310, Oliver’s father died leaving him lands in Hampshire, Wiltshire, Suffolk and Norfolk.

4/6/1310, IPM of John de Ingham. Suffolk: Weybrede. A manor … Oliver his son, aged 23, is his next heir … (S) CIsPM.

5/22/1310, Order to the escheator on this side Trent to deliver to Oliver de Ingham, son and heir of John de Ingham, tenant in chief, the lands late of his said father, he having done homage, saving to Margery late the wife of John, her dower. (S) CFRs.

1310, Oliver summoned to serve in Scotland.

1310, King Edward, invading Scotland, would spend a year on the expedition with no major conflicts, using Berwick as his base of operations.

8/23/1311, Commission into the persons who assaulted Oliver de Ingham’s men and servants at Wycheford, co. Wilts, killed a horse of his of the price of 100s., and carried away his goods. (S) CPRs.

4/3/1313 at London, Debtor: Oliver de Ingham [Happing Hundred, Norfolk]. Amount: £123 3s. 1d. (S) UKNA.

1314, Oliver summoned to serve in Scotland.

6/24/1314, Battle of Bannockburn, Scotland, a victory for the Scots, unusual in that it lasted for 2 days. The Scots, commanded by Robert Bruce, were laying siege to Stirling castle, held by the English. As the English attacked across the brook, Robert counter-attacked along a 2000-yard front. King Edward attempted to flank the Scot’s left with archers, but they were driven back the Scot cavalry. The English front broke against the Scottish spearmen. It was the largest loss of English knights in a single day. This was the battle in which organized foot-soldiers [primarily pike men] defeated heavily armored mounted knights.

1314-15, Oliver, son and heir of Sir John Ingham, paid £50 relief for a moiety of the barony of Walleran, (the other moiety being in Sir Reginald de St. Martin) and in right of this he was lord of West Dean, &c. in Wiltshire.

[––Oliver & Elizabeth––]

~1305, Oliver married Elizabeth.

10/17/1315, Enrolment of grant by Oliver de Ingham, knight, to Thomas Fastolf and Nicholas his son of the manor of Redham. (S) CCRs.

12/18/1315, Commitment during pleasure to Oliver de Ingham of the keeping of the manor of Otteleye, co. York. (S) CFRs.

2/7/1316, Oliver de Ingham acknowledges that he owes to John de Lere and Cambinus Fulberti £20; to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in the county of Norfolk. (S) UKNA.

12/30/1316, Commitment to Oliver de Ingeham of the keeping of the manor of Wyghton with the hundred of Northgrenelowe, co. Norfolk. (S) CFRs.

12/30/1317, Oliver de Ingham, knight, acknowledges that he owes to John de Sandale, bishop of Winchester, 50 marks; to be levied, in default of payment, of his lands and chattels in co. Norfolk. (S) CCRs.

8/1/1318, To Oliver de Ingham. Order not to intermeddle further with the manor of Wighton and the hundred of Northgrenet, co. Norfolk, and to deliver the issues from 9 July last to Ralph de Eu, count of Eu. (S) CCRs.

1320, Oliver, Governor of Ellesmere castle.

1321, Oliver de Ingham to grant his manors of East Codford and West Dean to Robert le Bor at a rent. Wilts. (S) UKNA.                                                                                          

12/6/1321, Writ of aid for Oliver de Ingham and Robert Lewer appointed to seize into the king’s hands all the lands and goods of Roger Dammory, Hugh Daudele, the younger, … Henry le Tyes, … John Mautravers, the younger, … and Bartholomew de Badelesmere in the counties of Oxford, Berks, Wilts and Gloucester. (S) CPRs.

3/10/1322, King Edward at the defeat of the forces of Earl Thomas of Lancaster at the river Trent.

1322, Oliver a supporter of the King against Earl Thomas of Lancaster; tried to hold Bridgenorth against Roger de Mortimer.

1322, Oliver made Justice of Chester.

1322, Oliver attended the king on an expedition into Scotland.

10/14/1322, King Edward at the losing Battle of Byland, 20 miles north of York, against Robert Bruce, King of Scotland. [This defeat compelled King Edward to recognize Scottish independence.]

11/14/1323, Oliver ordered to pursue the adherents of Roger de Mortimer, who had escaped from the Tower in London. [Roger de Mortimer fled to France where he became estranged Queen Isabella’s lover.]

1324, Oliver attended the Great Council at Westminster; appointed an advisor to Edmund, Earl of Kent in Gascony.

4/1324, Oliver sent with Edmund, earl of kent, the king’s brother, on embassy to King Charles IV of France at Paris. (S) CPRs., 3/26/1323.

8/1324, King Edward began the War of Saint-Sardos with his brother-in-law King Charles of France, who had invaded Aquitaine.

1324, Oliver served under Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent in Aquitaine during the War of Saint-Sardos.

1324-5, Oliver, Marshall of the English army, in the War of Saint-Sardos between King Edward and King Charles of France.

2/4/1325, Oliver de Ingham, to Hugh le Despenser, jnr.: his responsibility for the events in Gascony; a French breach of the truce; increased French forces. (S) UKNA. [The Despensers were the downfall of King Edward II.]

4/1325, Hugh le Despenser junior to Oliver de Ingham: thanks for his news; he apologizes for not writing often, because of the pressure of work; he will deal with the points raised; Ingham should do his duties by the king; the office of marshal of the army. (S) UKNA.

10/7/1325, Oliver Ingham appointed by Edward, duke of Guyenne and earl of Chester, as seneschal of Gascony. Oliver made attacks against French positions, including a successful attack against Agen. (S) The War of Saint-Sardos, Offices of the Royal Historical Society, 1954.

1326-7, Bonet de Sulir … in Gascony … ordered by Oliver de Ingham, then Seneschal of Gascony, to go with him, with 8 mounted men-at-arms and 40 foot sergeants to succour and provision the castle of Saintes. (S) UKNA.

9/24/1326, Roger de Mortimer and Queen Isabella invaded England, landing at Ipswich, joining up with Henry, Earl of Lancaster and other opponents of the Despensers.

1/24/1327, Edward III, age 14, succeeded Edward II as King of England. [1/20/1327, Edward II abdicated.]

2/4/1327, Oliver, having  returned to England, a Commissioner of Regency [1 of 12] during the minority of King Edward III.

2/19/1327, Protection for John de la Tour by testimony of Oliver de Ingham, steward of Gascony. (S) CPRs.

4/1/1327, Beginning of letters of Charles, King of France, pardoning the banished Oliver de Ingham and others in Guienne. (S) UKNA.

6/1328, Oliver, called to parliament, named Chief Justice of Chester.

2/1329, Oliver a Justice in the trial of those that had attempted to overthrow Roger de Mortimer. [Oliver conducted multiple trials over the next year.]

3/14/1330, Roger de Mortimer executed Edward II’s half-brother, 28-year-old Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent. [This act by Queen Isabella and Roger, execution of a King’s son, would quickly lead to their downfall.]

3/21/1330, Oliver and John Mautravers appointed to discover the adherents of Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent.

10/18/1330 at Nottingham castle, King Edward III captured his mother Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer [who was soon executed.] Isabella was escorted to Windsor where she was placed under house arrest.

10/19/1330, Oliver captured at Nottingham castle, sent to the Tower in London. [Like Mortimer’s sons, Oliver was never charged with a crime.]

12/8/1330, Oliver received a full pardon from King Edward III.

1331, Oliver, Justiciar of Chester. (S) UKNA.

6/1332, Oliver reappointed Seneschal of Gascony. (S) UKNA. [Oliver granted £400 yearly in expenses in addition to his fee for being Seneschal.]

7/1333 at Bordeaux, Oliver de Ingham, seneschal of Aquitaine, and John Travers, constable of Bordeaux, to Edward III: a complaint of a robbery of a Gascon merchant. (S) UKNA.

10/1334, Oliver sent word to King Edward that King Philip VI of France intended to seize Ponthieu as ransom for disputed castles. (S) Edward III, Ormrod, 2013, P185.

12/26/1335, Order to cause Oliver de Ingham, seneschal of Gascony, who is staying there in the king's service in his office, to have respite until Midsummer next for all the debts which he owes to the king. (S) CCRs.

1337, Oliver, Seneschal of Gascony, headquarter at Bordeaux when the Hundred Years War began.

11/1337, King Edward, claiming the throne of France through his mother, beginning the 100 Years War with the battle of Cadzand, a Flemish island. With 600 men-at-arms and 2000 archers they embarked on the Thames from London. On the third tide they left Margate for Cadsant. The locals and soldiers saw them coming. The French attached the ships with archers. The English landed with battle axes, sword and lances. The English archers then decimated the French. More than 3000 French soldiers were killed. Edward III had the village burnt before returning to England.

6/5/1338 at Bordeaux, Oliver de Ingham to Edward III: request for the ransoming of a captured messenger. (S) UKNA.

1339, Oliver defeated a French force before Bordeaux.

1340 at Bordeaux, Oliver de Ingham, seneschal of Aquitaine, to Edward III: certificate of lands etc. lost by the lord d'Albret. (S) UKNA.

1341, Debenture of the treasury of Bordeaux Castle for £103 6s to John Dyeus, knight, for wages of himself and 4 mounted squires retained by Oliver de Ingham, knight, Seneschal of Aquitaine. (S) UKNA.

7/1342, Oliver, having returned to England to get fresh troops for Edward III’s campaign in Brittany, sailed back to Gascony from Dartmouth.

1343, John le Archdekne served in Gascony under Oliver de Ingham. [Oliver repaired the castle at Bayonne. (S) UKNA.]

4/6/1343, Oliver recalled from Gascony.

1/29/1344, “Oliver de Ingham: Wiltshire, Hampshire, Suffolk, Norfolk, Dorset”, Lord Ingham, knight, died; buried in Holy Trinity Church, Ingham: “Mounsier Oliver de Ingham gist icy, et Dame Elizabeth sa compagne que luy Dieux de les almes eit mercy.” Oliver died possessed of the manor of Weybread [which the husband of Joan possessed at his death.]

1/30/1344, Writ for IPM of Oliver de Ingham in counties Norfolk, Suffolk, Southampton, Wilts, Oxford, Berks, Surrey, and Sussex. (S) CFRs.

[––Elizabeth––]

2/26/1344, Grant to the king's aunt, Mary, countess of Norfolk, of the wardship of the lands late of Oliver de Ingham, chivaler, until the lawful age of Mary, daughter of John de Curzon, kinswoman and one of the heirs of Oliver. (S) CFRs. [See 6/21/1334 below.]

5/7/1344, Order to deliver to Elizabeth, late the wife of Oliver de Ingham, the manors of Waxtenesham [Norfolk, £9 13s 10d yearly], Lammesse [Norfolk, 42s yearly] and Weybrede [Suffolk, £10 10s 7d yearly], Stupellangeford [Wilts, £6  11s 10d yearly] and Hampteworth [Wilts, 24s yearly] together with the issues thereof, to hold in dower, as of the lands which belonged to Oliver at his death the king assigned to Elizabeth, with the assent of Roger Lestraunge and Joan his wife, one of Oliver's daughters and heirs … [5+ knights’ fees] … the advowson of Badingham church, co. Suffolk, extended at £20 yearly … advowson of the church of St. John the Baptist, Waxtenesham, co. Norfolk, extended at £6  yearly … the church of St. Margaret, Waxtenesham at 40s yearly … Somerset … [£120+ yearly] … (S) CCRs.

6/1349, The Plague reached Dorset, and had spread across England by the end of 1349.

10/11/1350, Elizabeth died.

10/16/1350, Order to escheator of Wilts … 2 parts of the manor of Estcodeford, together with the advowson of the church of that town, for the life of Katharine late the wife of John son of Oliver de Ingham, now a minoress of the order of the abbey of minoresses without Algate, London, … the said Oliver granted them with the king's licence to her and her said husband and the heirs of their bodies, with reversion to himself and his heirs, and that John died without such heir, and that Katharine after his death, before entering the said order, granted them for her life to … all now deceased, … the third part now belongs to Joan late the wife of Roger Lestraunge, daughter and heir of the said Oliver, who is of full age, … to deliver the said 2 parts and advowson to Joan, as the king has respited her homage and fealty. (S) CFRs.

11/10/1350, Writ for IPM of Elizabeth late the wife of Oliver de Ingham. Wilts: Stupellangeford. A moiety of the manor. Hampteworth. The manor. … Estcodeford. A third part of the manor … She died on 11 October, 24 Edward III. The reversion of all the aforesaid lands &c. belongs to Joan, late the wife of Roger Lestraunge, daughter and heir of Oliver de Ingham, who is of full age. (S) CIsPM.

(S) Ess. Tow’s Topo. Hist. of Norfolk, V9, 1808, Ingham.

Family notes:

·         Holinshed calls Oliver (30422630) a young, lusty, valiant knight, in great esteem with King Edward II.

Children of Oliver and Elizabeth:

i. Oliver de Ingham, born ? in England.

1326, Oliver died before his father leaving his brother John as the heir.

ii. John de Ingham, born ? in England.

John married Katherine ?

John died, his sisters his heirs, Katherine holding dower.

Katherine became a minoress of the order of the abbey of minoresses without Algate, London.

1350, Katherine died, revisions to John’s sister Joan. [Likely died in the plague.]

iii. Elizabeth de Ingham, born ? in England.

Elizabeth married Sir John de Curson.

By 1344, Elizabeth died before her father.

Daughter Mary (b.1335, d.1349). Mary married John de Cobham, and then Stephen de Tumby. [No children.]

6/21/1344, Order to John Mauduyt, escheator in the county of Wilts, to deliver to Roger Lestraunge and Joan (15211315) his wife, daughter and one of the heirs of Oliver de Ingham, … Joan's pourparty … Mary daughter of John Curzon, kinswoman and the other heir of Oliver, until Mary's lawful age. (S) CFRs.

1349, Mary died, her aunt Joan her heir. [Likely died in the plague.]

iv. Joan de Ingham (15211315), born ~1320 in England.


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