Sunday, January 3, 2010

Bell 168 Thomas-Black

168. Col. John Thomas & 169. Jane Black {Spartanburg Co., Greenville Co. SC}


4/5/1720, John born in Wales, s/o 336. Jonathan Thomas & 337. Victoria Newcastle.
7/8/1723, Jane born in Chester Co., PA; d/o 338. Robert Black & 339. Ann Waters.
John raised in Chester Co, PA.
1/3/1740, John married Jane. [Jane “rather below the ordinary stature, with brown eyes and hair, rounded and pleasing features, fair complexion, and countenance sprightly and expressive”. (S) Hist. of Spar. Co., Reed, 1962, P188.]
~1749, they moved from PA to SC, on Fishing Creek at Catawba River.
1754, John received a land grant in Anson Co. NC.
1755, The Cherokee Indians by treaty opened upper SC to settlement.
1755, John received a 2nd land grant in Anson Co. NC.
11/1755, John was a Captain of the Royal Militia [British], taking part in “Braddock’s Defeat” near present day Pittsburg, PA. Braddock lacked military experience and was poorly organized. This defeat of his 1500 troops against 300-600 Indians and 30 French Colonial troops initiated a series of attacks by Indians in MD, PA, and VA. This initiated a wave of settlers moving to the Carolinas where there was a treaty with the Indians and land was being offered at 50 acres per head.
1762 Winter, John was a Commander of the Royal Militia and a Magistrate of the British Government during the French and Indian War against the Cherokees.
1762, they moved to the confluence of Fairforest and Kelso creeks in the Upper Piedmont [Broad River] District. This is now part of the Spartanburg Co. Croft State Park and Natural Area. There is a DAR marker [somewhat inaccessible] placed at the site in 1904.
1762, John and Jane were founders of Fairforest Church.
~1770, John resigned his English Commission.
7/5/1771, John purchased land from Giles and Constant Tillett in Charleston Co., SC. (S) Charleston Co. Deed G-4:307-311.
1775, On the orders of Gen. Richardson, John formed the Patriot’s Spartan Regt., elected Colonel and Commander of the Militia. Every man was a volunteer. This unit would become known as the “Flying Camp” because of the frequency of action and movement. The unit reported to Col. Roebuck. (S) 2/3/1783 War Pension Petition.
9/11/1775, John Thomas, letter to William Henry Drayton informing him of the gathering of his regiment (2 pages; printed, Gibbes, Documentary History, 1764-1776, P. 170.). (S) SCDA&H, S-213089, Box 2, Folder 3.
The unit captured 2 Tory couriers revealing important information about the SC Governor’s alliance with the British.
9/22/1775, John’s unit participated in the “Ring Fight” against the Indians. The Indians had set up an ambush and forced the army into a circular defensive position.
12/25/1775, The unit met up with the NC army at Hollingsworth Mills in the Laurens Dist. There was a heavy snow – which gave the expedition the name of “Snow Campaign”. An account of the campaign can be found in Colon. and Rev. Hist. of Upper SC, P71.
2/1776, Col John Thomas appointed Commander of the Upper or Spartan District [which now would be equivalent to Union Co.] by the provincial Congress under the influence of Col. Richardson who had commanded the Snow Campaign. The Patriot Regt. stored their ammunition cache at John’s house.
3/1776, John became a member of the 1st Provencial General Assembly.
9/22/1776, John participated in the “Ring Fight” where they had been encircled by Indians, but won the battle when reinforcements arrived. (S) Colon. and Rev. Hist. of Upper SC, PP84…
5/1777, Col Thomas promoted Joseph McJunkin [his future son-in-law] to Capt., and sent him to service on the frontier. He was assigned to a unit split off from John’s unit, the 2nd Spartan Regt.
10/23/1778, John ordered to GA by Gen. Williamson.
12/26/1778, John ordered to the Indian line by Gen. Williamson.
1/3/1779, John served under the orders of Gen. Lincoln on the expedition to Stono.
(S) 1779 SC Census, 96th Dist. John Thomas.
6/8/1779, John serving under orders “Law Martiel”.
8/19/1779, John placed by under orders of Gen. Williamson and particpated in the seige of Savanah.
1779-1780, Capt. John Thomas Jr was in charge of the guarding the arms and homestead [with about 25 regulars] while the rest of the Regt. was off fighting in Charlestown. Jane, three of her daughters, and her youngest son William were at the homestead. Tory Col Patrick Moore and his much larger contingent marched on the homestead to capture the ammunitions. Capt John Thomas and his men gathered up as much as they could and rode off to hide the ammunitions. Josiah, husband of Martha, was an Indian fighter. He fired continuously at the approaching Tories while the other family members reloaded the rifles. The diversion made the Tories believe that the Patriot’s were still inside, and gave the others time to escape. As told by Capt. Culbertson in 1832, as the final assault was to be made, Jane moved in front of the troops with a sword and dared the Tories to attack. The Tories then retired. A record of this battle is recorded on the tombstone of daughter Anne Thomas [McJunkin].
6/1780, John Sr and his two sons Abram and Robert were captured by Tory Captain Sam Brown and imprisoned about 60 miles SE of Spartanburg [now the National Park Service’s 96 Historic Site]. Sam Brown took John’s slaves and horses. [John was later transferred to Charleston where he remained prisoner for the duration of the war.]
7/11/1780, Jane visited her husband and sons in the 2-story brick jail. She overheard a conversation about a Tory attack on the Rebels planned for the next night at Cedar Spring, which is just a few miles from the family homestead. John Jr was in charge of this unit and multiple related family members were part of the unit. Jane got on her horse and headed to inform her son.
2/3/1783, John Thomas, at Charleston, petition requesting his pay for military service during the American Revolution. (S) SCDA&H, S-108092, Reel-145, F-454. See Family notes.
1784, John appointed commissioner of land locations for the north side of the Slauda River in the new Greenville Co.
1785, the family moved to the vincity of Greenville [near present Greer]. The family home was known as “Milford”.
3/21/1786, Thomas and Ann Tod conveyed to John Thomas Sr 440 acres on the NE side of the “South Fork of Tyger River above the ancient boundary …”. The deed describes John as “Commissioner of Locations for the north side of Saluda River”.
(S) 1790 Census, SC, Greenville Co. John lives near his sons John Jr and Wm. 1 m<16, 5 f’s, 4 slaves.
9/24/1800, John Thomas, bill of sale for a slave named Winney and her daughter, Betsey, about 10 years of age. (S) SCDA&H, S-213003, V-3P, P-177.
(S) 1800 Census, SC, Greenville Co. John lives near his sons John Jr and “Wm. D” and Wm Jr, about the same age as Wm. 00101,10001, 7 slaves.
(S) 1810 Census, SC, Greenville Co. John Thomas: 20101,01101, 1 freed slave, 14 slaves. [Note there are 3 “John Thomas” listings on the same page.]
4/16/1811, Jane died in Greenville Co., SC. Until the day of her death Jane Thomas refused to drink tea, saying it was “the blood of the poor men who first fell in the war.” Two of her sons, Abram and Robert died in the war.
4/18/1811, John wrote his will in Greenville District, SC – see family notes.
5/2/1811, John wrote a codicil to his will – see family notes.
5/25/1811, (S) Carolina Gazette of Charleston: “Died on the 16th of April, in the 91st year of her age, Mrs. Jane Thomas, wife of Col. John Thomas. She was descended from respectable parents of the name of Blac in the State of Pennsylvania, was a usefl member of society, and a pious Christian of the Presbyterian persuasion. The husband of her youth is left, old and decrepid, he feels it most sensibly – Her children, numerous; while they lament their loss, they are consoled with the hope that she is gone to the friend of sinners Jesus Christ. She was a sincere and spirited whig. In the year 1779, when the tories attacked the house of her husband, to get at a magazine kept there, she advanced in front of them, with a sword in her hand and dared tham to come on. They were intimidated and retired. She steadily refused to drink any tea after the revolutionary war commenced, saying “it was the blood of some of the poor men who first fell in the war.” She enjoyed good health through her long life, lived on a spare diet, with frequent draughts of butter-milk, bur never took any physic.”
2/10/1814, John died in Greenville Co., SC; buried at “White Stone in a grave enclosed by an iron fence”. (S) DAR American Monthly Magazine, V28, 1905, P146.
4/7/1814, John Thomas Sr. will probated.
11/30/1814, (S) Carolina Gazette of Charleston: “[Died], on the 2d of October last, in the Greenville district, South Carolina, Colonel John Thomas, aged 93 years. Col. Thomas was a native of Pensylvania, was in Braddoci’s defeat in 1755, in the expedition against the Cherokee Indians in 1762 and served with reputation to himself and usefulness to his country through the revolutionary war.”
(S) Southern Campaigns of the American Revolution, V2, No.5, PP15-17.  (S) Major Joseph McJunkin, or Original Sketches of the Revolutionary History of South Carolina, Rev. Saye, Watchman and Observer, 1848. [In 1838 Rev. Saye married Rebecca McJunkin, ggd/o John Thomas. He wrote from notes hand written by her grandfather Maj. Joseph McJunkin.]  (S) History of Spartanburg Co., Landrum, 1900, PP176…

Family notes:
• “To the Honorable the Speaker & Members of the House of Representative of the State of South Carolina. The memorial of Colonel John Thomas Senr sets forth: That he has been a Col of the Militia ever since the year 1775. That he has been active in that capacity from his appointment. That he has been reduced by the War in his Circumstances, in so much that, he finds a difficulty in supporting himself & Family. That he had two of his Negros carried away by the enemy, and a capital Fellow killed, on whom he principally depended for the conducting of his whole plantation businesses. That his circumstances received a greater injury than they wou’d otherwise have done by a long imprisonment of his person for fourteen months. That he has not received any pay for his services from Spring 1777 except one ninety dollar Bill. That he will esteem it in high Favor if his Country will be pleased to order him his pay and a Relief by any manageable, practicable O speedy mode as they in their wisom shall see fit. Charleston, 3d. Feby. 1783.” /s/ John Thomas [See Misc Graphics on CD].
• Will of John Thomas Sr: “In the name of God Amen ---- I John Thomas, of the state & district aftresaid, being through the abundant mercy & goodness of Good tho’ aged & infirm in body, yet of sound understanding and memory do constitute, this, my last Will & Testament and desire it may be received by all as such. First I most humbly bequeath my soul to God my maker, beseeching his most Gracious acceptance of it, thro the all sufficient mediation of my Compassionate Reedeemer Jesus Christ ---- I give my body to the earth, to be buried ina decent manner without pomp. As to worldly goods, I will & possitively order that all my Debts to be paid ---- I give & bequeath to my son John Thomas Junr. Thirty Dollars, as his full Dividend. To three Daughters of my son Robert (who is dead) I give twenty Dollars Each. To my Daughter Martha, Wife of Josiah Culbertson I give Fifty Dollars. To my Daughter Anne, wife of Joseph McJunkin, I give My Negro woman Rose. To the children of my Daughter Lettice Lusk, I give one Hundred Dollars equally divided. To my daughter Jean, wife to Joseph McCool, I give Fifty Dollars. To my son William D. Thomas, I give my Two Negroes Men, Viz. Sharper & March. To my daughter Esther wife to Robert Carter I give Twnet five Dollars her full Dividend. To John Thomas Son of my son Robert, I give one cow & calf over & above what he has received already, as his full dividend. To my Grand daughters Anne Thomas & Lettice Lusk, I give each one Cow & Calf, and if the Estate will admit of a small Legacy to them on a final settlement I am agreed & wish it. My Negore Woman Moll, & her Children, viz: Frank, Seeboo, Ben, Edmond, Rose, Will, Charles, & Sinda: (If I gain the suit in the Court of Equity that is about them) I give to my Daughter Anne McJunkin: & my son Wm. D. Thomas, Equally. & I do constitute & appoint my Beloved son William D. Thomas & my beloved son in law Joseph McJunkin, My Executors, to see, this my last will & testament Executed. Given under my had & seal this 18th day of April A.D. 1811.” /s/ Jno. Thomas. (S) Greenville District, Will Typescript, WB-C, PP15-17.
• Codicil of will of John Thomas Sr.: “Be it known unto all men by these presents that I John Thomas of Greeneville District in the State afpresaod. Jave ,ade amd declared, that the above my last will & testament, in writing, bearing date the 18th day of April last; I the said John Thomas do, by these presents contained in this codicil, ratify & confirm my said last will, and do give & bequeath unto my son Wm. D. Thomas, my lands not heretofore convey’d, and all the furniture of my House & Kitchen, consisting of a Colck, Cupboard, Book Case, Tables Charis, Cookware etc., and my will & meaning is, that this codicil or schedule be esteemed and adjudged to be par or parcel of my said will and Testament, and that all thins therein contained & mentioned be faithfully performed, in as full and ample manner, in Every respect, as if the same were so declard & set down in my said will. In witness whereof, I the said John Thomas have hereunto set my hand & seal this second day of May A.D. 1811.
• Will of William Davis Thomas: “… Amen. I William Davis Thomas … First … my soul to God … I give and bequeath to my dear and loving wife, during her life and widowhood the house in which we now dwell, together with all the furniture of said house and kitchern, this whole plantation, stock of kind and after her death to William D Thoms Culbertson. I give to my brother John Thomas if he survives me $25, but if he dies first, his children to have … I give to the three daughters of Robert Thomas, deceased, $10 each to his son John Thomas title to a piece of land to complete a mill seat and room, at and about a mill he is about building, I give my sister Martha Culbertson if she survives me $50, if she does not, then this legacy to be equally divided amongst her children (except William D. T. Cultbertson, whom I do not allow to have any of it. I give to my sister Anne McJunkin if she survives me $40, … I give to the children of my sister Lettice Lusk, deceased, … I give to my sister Jane McCool, if she survives me $60, … I give to the children of my sister Esther, who was wife to Robert Carter, & has lately died, … I do hereby constitute and appoint William D Thos Culbertson my executor … and agent for my dear wife during her life, … set my hand and seal the 31st of January 1814.” /s/ W. D. Thomas.
• Col. Thomas’ rifle [235 years old, made in Spartanburg Co., SC] is part of the collection of the Royal Armory at Windsor Castle. On the walnut stock is one of the 1st symbols used to signify the union of the 13 colonies – a silver inlaid, 13 pointed star, inscribed with “States United We Are One”. John’s initials are on the silver thumb piece. The rifle is believed to have been captured when John’s son Robert was using it and died at the Battle of Mud Lick Creek. (S) The Drover’s Post, 2005; Spartanburg [S.C.] Journal, 8/10/1970.

Children of John and Jane:

i. Capt. Abram Thomas, born ~1745 in PA.
1775, Abram joined the Patriot’s Spartan Regt.
6/1780, John Sr and his two sons Abram and Robert were imprisoned about 60 miles SE of Spartanburg [now the National Park Service’s 96 Historic Site].
~1781, Abram died in the 96th Distr. of SC while imprisoned by the British.

ii. Capt. Robert Thomas ( 84), born ~1747 in PA.

iii. Col. John Thomas Jr, born 5/26/1751 in PA.
~1771 in the 96th Distr., SC, John married Margaret McElwayne, born 11/16/1745.
10/12/1773, John Thomas Jr, memorial for 250 acres on Fair Forest Creek, Tryon Co., NC. (S) SCDA&H, S-111001, V-12, P-438. This land was previously owned by his father.
1775, John joined the Patriot’s Spartan Regt.
(S) 1779 SC Census, 96th Dist. John Thomas.
1779–1780, John Jr was in charge of the guarding the arms and homestead.
5/12/1780, John Jr was at the fall of Charleston.
7/1780, John Jr was in command of the reorganized Flying Camp unit after the capture of his father and 2 of his brothers.
7/12/1780, John Jr, based on information supplied by his mother, laid a trap for Tory units planning a night attack. Their 60 soldiers easily defeated the 150 man British unit. This was the 3rd Battle of Cedar Spring.
1/17/1781, John fought at the Battle of Cowpens.
1781, John served in the light dragoons under Gen. Sumter.
11/26/1783, John Thomas Jr, a signer of “Ninety Six District, presentment concerning the granting of recognizances by the Court of Sessions and the fees charged by lawyers.” (S) SCDA&H, S-165010, Y-1783, I-1.
6/1785, John clerk of the County Court held at Nichol’s Mill.(S) Hist. of Spar. Co., P16.
11/2/1785, John Thomas Jr., plat for 500 acres on the East Fork of the French Broad River, 96 Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190, V-6, P-301.
(S) 1790 Census, SC, Greenville Co. John Junr. lives near father and brother Wm. 2 m>21, 5 m<16, 3 f’s, 1 slave.
11/28/1795, John Thomas, Jun., of Greenville Co., conveyed to Joseph Wofford, ‘all that plantation, tract, or parcel of land situated in Spartanburg county, on both sides of Fairforest Creek, containing two hundred and fifty acres, including the plantation whereon the said John Thomas formerly lived, joining lands laid off for John Thomas, Sen., Josiah Culbertson and James Tillette—except a few acres sold to said Culbertson—when said land was granted to the John Thomas, Jun., in the year of our Lord 1771, under the hand of William Tryon, then Governor of North Carolina. [Thomas family homestead containing “the Houses, barns, gardens, orchards, fields, pastures, ways, waters and water courses, paths, passages, and. . .appurtenances thereunto …] (S) Southern Campaigns of the American Revolution, V2, No.5, P18.
3/21/1798, John sold land “in Spartanburg Co. on the north side of Fairforest” for $200 to Moses Foster. (S) Greenville Co., DB-F, PP101-2.
(S) 1800 Census, SC, Greenville Co. John Junr. lives near father and brother “Wm. D” and Wm Jr. 11201,20001, 4 slaves.
11/24/1803, John Thomas Jr., plat for 22 acres, Greenville Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213192, V-40, P-187.
(S) 1810 Census, SC, Greenville Co. John Thomas: 00101,02201. [Note there are 3 “John Thomas” listings on the same page.]
4/18/1811, John Jr given $30 in the will of his father.
1/31/1814, John given $25 in the will of his brother Wm D Thomas.
~1815, after his father died, the family moved to IL. [There are 2 John Thomas’ in Franklin Co. GA about this time, one of whom dies about 1815 who has family in IL.]
(S) 1818 IL State Census, St. Clair Co. “John D Thomas” and 9 other white persons. [This is just SE of present day St. Louis, MO.]
7/29/1819, John died in Shiloh, Saint Clair Co., IL; buried in Shiloh Cem.
Children:
Anne Thomas, born ?.
4/7/1814, Anne also given a cow & calf by her grandfather.

iv. Jane [Jean] Thomas, born ~1754.
~1775, Jane married Joseph McCool, born 1750 in SC.
8/26/1784, Joseph, plat for 137 acres on Thompson’s Beaver Dam Creek, 96th Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
1/30/1787, Joseph, plat for 246 acres on Middle Fork of the Tygar River, 96th Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
8/26/1784, Joseph, plat for 437 acres on Thompson’s Beaver Dam Creek, Greenville Co., Washington Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213192.
(S) 1790 Census, SC, Greenville Co. Joseph McCool, 2,2,4.
(S) 1800 Census, SC, Greenville Co. Joseph McCool, 41101,21110.
4/18/1811, Joseph & Jean given $50 in the will of her father.
1/31/1814, Jane given $60 in the will of her brother Wm D Thomas.
(S) 1820 Census, IL, Gallatin Co. Joseph: 010221,31111, 17 slaves. 19 persons engaged in manufacturing.
7/11/1820, IL State Census, Gallatin Co.: Joseph McCool.
~ 1825, Joseph died in Shawneetown, Gallatin Co., IL. [Far SE IL.]
~ 1830, Jane died in Shawneetown, Gallatin Co., IL.
Children:
Abraham Thomas McCool, born ?.
4/5/1814, he is named in the will of his uncle Wm D Thomas.
9/25/1818, he purchased land in IL.

v. Martha Thomas, born 3/4/1756 in PA.
1779-1780, Martha married Capt. Josiah Culbertson.
1784, Josiah purchased 379 acres on Branch of Fair Forest, 96th Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
(S) 1790 Census, SC, Spartanburg Co. Josiah: 1,4,5; 1 slave.
1792, Josiah petitioned for compensation for a slave executed for murder. (S) SCDA&H, S-165015, Y-1792.
~1793 Josiah died.
11/29/1793, “Mrs. Culbertson”, plat for 176 acres on Bush Creek. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
4/18/1811, Josiah & Martha given $50 in the will of her father.
1/31/1814, Martha given $50 in the will of her brother Wm D Thomas.
8/22/1827, Martha died in Davies Co., IN.
Children:
William D Thomas Culbertson, born ?.
1/31/1814, he is named executor in the will of his uncle Wm D Thomas.

vi. Anne Thomas, born 1/15/1757.
3/9/1779, Anne married Major Joseph McJunkin, born 6/22/1755 near Carlisle, PA; s/o Samuel of Ireland.
(S) 1779, SC State Census, 96th Distr.: Joseph McJunkin.
5/8/1781, Joseph taken prisoner at his father’s home on Tinker’s Creek.
4/14/1785, Joseph, plat for 40 acres on Tinkers Creek, 96th Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
8/22/1786, Joseph, plat for 325 acres on Tinkers Creek, 96th Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
(S) 1790 Census, SC, Union Co. Joseph: 1,4,2; 4 slaves.
2/18/1792, Daniel McJunkin of Greenville County SC conveys to Joseph McJunkin of Union County SC, for £7, a 150-acre tract of land in Union County on Tinker Creek.
(S) 1800 Census, SC, Union Co. Joseph: 33120,10110; 10 slaves.
1802, Joseph, “Contractor, petition asking compensation for losses sustained in building the Union District Court House.” (S) SCDA&H, S-165015.
(S) 1810 Census, SC, Union Co. Joseph: 22201,01001; 8 slaves.
11/20/1810, Joseph, “petition asking compensation for losses sustained in building the Union District Court House.” (S) SCDA&H, S-165015.
4/18/1811, Joseph & Anne given “My Negro Woman Rose” in the will of her father.
1/31/1814, Anne given $40 in the will of her brother Wm D Thomas.
7/6/1818, Joseph, plat for 15.5 acres on Tinkers Creek, 96th Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213192.
(S) 1820 Census, SC, Union Co. Joseph Sr: 220001,20111; 11 slaves.
3/17/1826 Anne died; buried with Joseph.
(S) 1830 Census, SC, Union Co. Joseph Sr, 70-80; 1 f 20-30, 4 males 5-30.
6/1/1840, (S) 1840 Census, SC, Union Co. “Maj.” Joseph, age 85, revolutionary pensioner. 1 f 30-40, 1 m 15-20.
5/31/1846 Joseph died; buried in the McJunkin Cem., on the Sartor farm in Union Co., 5 miles south of Union on US Hwy 176 [near the point where SR163 intersects].
Children:
Joseph McJunkin Jr., born 10/8/1791 in SC.
1817, he married Nancy Sator, 1796–1856.
2/27/1850, he died in Union Co., SC.
David Waites McJunkin, born 5/2/1801 in Union Co., SC.
5/25/1843, he 2nd married his cousin Jane H McHargue, d/o Martha Thomas84iv.

vii. Lettice Thomas, born 7/3/1760;
5/16/1782, Lettice married James Vance Lusk, born 8/15/1754 in VA.
2/28/1798, Lettice died in Union Co., SC.
9/24/1803, James died in Crittendon, Grant Co., KY.
[Bef. 4/18/1811 Lettice probably died – not named in the will of her father.]
Bef. 1/31/1814, Lettice died. (S) Deceased in the will of her brother William.
Children:
[4/18/1811, children give $100 in their grandfather Thomas’ will to be divided equally.]
John Thomas Lusk, born 11/7/1784 in SC.
He married Lucretia ?, born 1793 in GA.
1/31/1814, he is named in the will of his uncle Wm D Thomas.
(S) 1850 Census, IL, Madison Co., Edwardsville.
Esther Lusk, born 8/24/1786.
1/31/1814, she is named in the will of her uncle Wm D Thomas.
Robert James Lusk, born 2/6/1788 in SC.
9/28/1805, he died in Sarahville, IL.
Lettice Lusk, born 9/15/1790 in SC.
4/18/1811, she also given a cow & calf by her grandfather.
1/31/1814, she is 25 cents in the will of he uncle William.

viii. Esther Thomas, born ~1764.
Bef 1797, Esther married Robert Carter, born ~1760 in SC.
(S) 1800 Census, SC, Greenville Co. Robert: 20010,11010; 4 slaves.
4/18/1811, Robert & Esther given $25 in the will of her father.
Bef. 1/31/1814, Esther died. (S) “lately deceased” in the will of her brother Wm D Thomas.
Children: [identified but unnamed in the will of her brother William.]

ix. William Davis Thomas, born ~1763.
1775, William served as a young soldier in his father’s Spartan Regt.
3/28/1788, William witnessed a deed of his brother-in-law Joseph McJunkin.
(S) 1779 SC Census, 96th Dist. William Thomas.
3/2/1781, William, a soldier in the Patriot’s Spartan Regt., wounded at the Battle of Mud Lick Creek [aka Roebuck’s Defeat], where his brother Robert was killed.
8/19/1787, William, plat for 872 acres on South Tygar River and Clear Creek, 96th Dist. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
(S) 1790 Census, SC, Greenville Co. Wm lives near father and brother John. 1 m>21, 0 m<16, 1 f, 1 slave.
6/5/1793, William, plat for 1000 acres on Branch of Motlows Creek, Spartanburg Co. (S) SCDA&H, S-213190.
4/3/1797, William, plat for 500 acres on Branch of Wards and Frohock Creeks, Greenville Co. (S) SCDA&H, S-213192.
(S) 1800 Census, SC, Greenville Co. Wm lives near father and brother John and “Wm Jr.”. 00010,10020, 2 slaves.
11/22/1803, William, plat for 200 acres on Branch of Frohock Creek, Greenville Co. (S) SCDA&H, S-213192.
(S) 1810 Census, SC, Greenville Co. Wm D Thomas: 00001,00010, 3 slaves.
4/18/1811, William given 2 slaves in the will of his father and named executor.
1/31/1814, William Davis Thomas, Greenville Dist., wrote his will – see family notes. (S) Bk A, P230-231.
Bef. 4/5/1814, William died. (S) Will probated.
[William’s will named no surviving children.]

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