Featured Post

||| LINK to author's Amazon page

Sunday, October 18, 2020

Jamestown - New Sweden - Bayou la Batre - Dauphin Island

 Jamestown

5/13/1607, Jamestown founded in Virginia, the first permanent English settlement in North America. In 1608 a 2nd supply ship arrived carrying Thomas (11552). “The Second Supplie was a ship called the Mary Margett, which arrived here nine months after, about the time of Michaelmas, in her sixty persons, most gentlemen, few or no tradesmen, except some Polanders to make pitch, tarre, potashes, & etc., to be returned for perfect gaine, foe meanly likewise were there furnished forth for victualles, that in lesse than two monthes after their arrivall, want compelled us to imploye our time abroad in trading with the Indians for corne...”. (S) Colonial Records of Virginia, State Paper Office, V3, No.21-I. 

1609-1610 all but 60 of the 500 settlers died in the “Starving Winter”. In 1611 a small settlement was made as far up the north bank of the James River opposite the mouth of the Appomattox River. In 1617 the Virginia Company, hoping to expand population and agricultural production in the colony, encouraged private or voluntary associations organized on a joint stock basis to establish settlements in the area of the Company's patent. The Society of Smith's Hundred (later called Southampton Hundred) was organized in 1617. A painting based on archealogical evidence is the oldest know settlement, the Martin Hundred, depicts what these “Hundred’s” looked like. In succeeding years, small enclaves were established on the south side of the lower James River, on the northern end of The Peninsula at the mouth of the York River (then known as Charles River), and across the Chesapeake Bay on the Eastern Shore. In March of 1622 there was an Indian massacre. On the day prior to the attack, the Indians came bringing gifts of meats and fruits and shared them with the settlers, thereby disguising their intentions. The following morning they circulated freely and socialized with the settlers before suddenly seizing their own work tools to attack them. The Indians killed families in the plantation houses and them moved on to kill servants and workers in the fields. The Powhatans killed 347 settlers. The settlers immediately withdrew to the fort and to other easily defensible locations. In addition to the loss of life, the colonists also lost valuable crops and supplies necessary to survive the winter. 

During the winter of 1622-23 the colonists were forced to trade with the Indians for corn and supplies and even with these provisions many went hungry, over four hundred settlers died. News of the killings did not reach England until mid-June. The Virginia Company responded by sending more supplies and weapons. The colonists in Jamestown retaliated with treachery of their own and numerous attacks to avenge the losses. They used the massacre as an excuse to wreak havoc on Indians wherever they found them. They feigned peaceful relations, let the Indians plant their corn wherever they chose, and then, just before the crop was ready for harvest they attacked, killing as many as they could and burning their crops. English armies destroyed entire villages. Within a couple of years, they had avenged the 347 deaths many times over. By 1634, the population of the colony was slightly less than 5,000, almost all of whom, except those on the Eastern Shore, still lived within about a 30-mile radius of Jamestown. 

In 1634, the colony was divided into eight "shires," or counties, to facilitate administration. These were: Henrico, Charles City, James City [all on the Peninsula], Elizabeth City, Warwick River, Charles River, Warrosquoake [on the south side of the mouth of the James River], Accomack [on the Eastern Shore]. Hungars Parish was made soon after the county was established, and the first minister was Rev. Francis Bolton, who was succeeded by Rev. William Cotton. The first vestry was appointed in 1635. The old Hungars Episcopal Church is located about seven miles north of Eastville, on the north side of Hungars Creek.

New Sweden

In 1637, Swedish, Dutch and German stockholders formed the New Sweden Company to trade for furs and tobacco in North America. Under the command of Peter Minuit, the company's first expedition sailed from Sweden late in 1637 in two ships, Kalmar Nyckel and Fogel Grip. Minuit had been the governor of the Dutch colony, New Netherland, centered on Manhattan Island, from 1626 to 1631. The ships reached Delaware Bay in March 1638, and the settlers began to build a fort at the site of present-day Wilmington, Delaware. They named it Fort Christina, in honor of Sweden's twelve-year-old queen. It was the first permanent European settlement in the Delaware Valley. During the next seventeen years, twelve more Swedish expeditions left the homeland for New Sweden. A total of eleven vessels and some 600 Swedes and Finns reached their destination. The colony eventually consisted of farms and small settlements along both banks of the Delaware River into modern Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland. New Sweden rose to its greatest heights during the governorship of Johan Printz (1643–1653). He extended settlement northward from Fort Christina along both sides of the Delaware River and improved the colony’s military and commercial prospects by building Fort Elfsborg, near present-day Salem on the New Jersey side of the river, to seal the Delaware against English and Dutch ships. Despite these steps, the Swedish and Finnish colonists lived peacefully with their Dutch and Lenni Lenape neighbors. In 1654, Printz was succeeded by the colony's last governor, Johan Rising, at a time when the Dutch capitol of New Amsterdam was ruled by the hot-tempered Peter Stuyvesant. Soon after arriving in New Sweden, Rising attempted to remove the Dutch from the colony by seizing Fort Casimir (present-day New Castle, Delaware), below Fort Christina on the western shore of the river. With no gunpowder, Fort Casimir surrendered without a shot and was re-named Fort Trinity. The furious Governor Stuyvesant had his revenge the following summer, when seven armed Dutch ships and 317 soldiers appeared on the Delaware River. Realizing that resistance would be useless, the vastly outnumbered Swedes surrendered Fort Trinity and Governor Rising surrendered Fort Christina two weeks later. 

The Swedes were farmers. Their transportation was by dugout canoe. Most Swedes owned horses and oxen, but few owned carriages or wagons. They traveled along the creeks and rivers. Overland “roads”, secondary paths, were mainly Indian trails. Thomas Paschal, a 1682 immigrant from Bristol, England noted: “most of the Sweads and Finns are ingenious people: they speak English, Swead, Finn, Dutch and the Indian.” … “have lived much at ease, having great plenty of all sorts of provisions.” … “plant but little Indian corn, nor tobacco” … “their women make the most of the linen cloth they wear; they spin and weave it and make fine linen. Many of them are curious housewives: The people generally eat rye bread, being approve of best by them.”

Bayou La Batre

On many early maps Bayou La Batre was called River Derbanne. It seems that a Frenchman, Frncois Guyon Des Pres Derbanne [a business partner of Graveline350] was lost in the area and the waters were given his name. In the early French days a battery was located at the mouth of the bayou, therefore the bayou was later called River Batterie. In time the name evolved to Bayou Batterie – Bayou Labatree and then Bayou La Batre. Even though the site was only thirty miles south of Mobile, it was a wilderness. The land was covered with towering pines and giant oaks. Fruits and nuts were plentiful, as were wild animals. The waters of the numerous bayous meandered about the area, and the bay where they emptied provided an abundance of seafood.

In 1832 the missionary Father Chalon visited Bayou La Batre. He was forced to abandon his horse for a pirogue, a small boat, because the area is marshy and has many bayous. He stayed the first night in a cabin which had a bed with only some bits of straw. He wrote, “I shall never again disdain the straw; the following nights I missed it…. If you want to see Frenchmen whose costume and simplicity call to mind the manners of the 12th century, I would strongly advise you to take me as your guide and I will conduct you to Bayou-la-Battrai. If you want to hear French spoken as it was written by Joinville, [Jean de Joinville, 1224–1319, a chronicler of medieval France] come first to Mobile, and I will lead you to Bayou-1a-Battrai. In the midst of these good farmers I found myself transported to an era which antedates ours by at least four centuries. …. It is true that they are very poor. I must also add that they are profoundly ignorant; but far from commerce with the world, they had not contracted its vices; their poverty was the rampart which saved their faith. They possess nothing that could tempt the cupidity of men; and so they have been abandoned to themselves as if they lived in terrignota;” (S) “Bayou La Batre: A Sketch”, by Archbishop Oscar Hugh Lipscomb, The Alabama Review, January 1966, PP20-27.

Dauphine Island

On 1/31/1699 the explorers Pierre Le Moyne and Sieur D’Iberville dropped anchor off the southern tip of Alabama. France had laid claim to this vast territory comprising three quarters of what is now the United States, and named it Louisiana after their king. Due to the fact that the two French ships, Le Marin and La Renommee, drew so much water the explorers set out in longboats to follow the mainland in an east-west direction. Passing by what is now Bayou La Batre and Cedar Point, they found this island. Coming upon a large pile of bones (possibly sixty men or women), D’Iberville named the island “Massacre.” The island was described as being covered with pines and cedars and being seven leagues long and one-fourth league wide. A league is about three miles. By 1701, the natural harbor on the south side was in constant use. Sand Island and Pelican Island formed a crescent shaped harbor, large enough and deep enough to accommodate thirty vessels. It was here that the ships were unloaded and their cargo put on shallow draft vessels to go upstream. Mobile Bay was too shallow to permit the larger boats access. Mobile was called the birthplace of the colony and Dauphine Island the cradle. Although the name “Massacre” hung on for many years, the island was named officially Isle Dauphine, in 1707. In 1711 pirates from British Jamaica attacked the colony on Dauphin Island. There was a lot of destruction, but no lives were lost. A hurricane of extreme intensity hit the island in 1717. The entrance to the harbor was blocked and three ships trapped. Much of the livestock was drowned. The damage influenced the French to move the capital first to Pascagoula, then to New Orleans. A number of families moved from the island after the storm. Two more ships arrived in 1718 with five hundred passengers. War was declared with Spain in 1719. The French attacked Pensacola, and in return the Spanish attacked Dauphine. The French successfully opposed the attack. Dauphin Island was occupied by the French until 1764, by the British from 1764 until 1781, by the Spanish from 1781 until 1813, when under orders from President Madison, General Wilkerson took Mobile during the final battle of the War of 1812.


Saturday, October 17, 2020

Walter Kempe of Cornwall

 16390. Walter Kempe

~1550, Walter born in Cornwall, England.

9/20/1571, Release of right to lands in Stoke Damarel, Plymouth, and Compton, from John Rede of Moore in St. Budeaux, right heir of Rose Rede, widow, to Mr. Walter Kempe of Stoke Damarel.

12/1/1573, Feoffment of lands in Markwell for Henry Kempe of Crede, Elizabeth his wife, and John Kempe their son and heir apparent, to Walter Kempe and another.

7/5/1592, Draft of Award of Compensation for lands taken or traversed by leat. … provisions of the Water Act … “Towne of Plymouthe … is in thoccupacon and possession of … John Marchaunt … Walter Kempe … beinge Tennts or farmo … and to the said Prouse for his Lande … in possession of the said Walter Kempe xxijs and to the said Walter Kempe … xxijs … ” (S) Cal. of Plymouth Municipal Records, Worth, 1893, P270.

4/8/1604, Walter Kempe buried at Stoke Damerel parish church. (S) FMP/PWDRO.

(S) Misc. Gen. et Her., V2, 1877, P195.

Children of Walter and ?:

i. William Kempe, born ? in England.

1581, William received a BA degree from Cambridge.

1582, William returned to Plymouth where he presided over 50-80 males ages 5-16, with the help of an usher who mostly worked with the younger children. William’s school was a chaple of an old almshouse furnished with benches along the walls (founded in 1561). William received a stipend of £20 a year (same salary as the mayor).

1587, William wrote “A Dutiful Invective.”

1588, “The Education of Children in Learning” by William Kempe of Plymouth. (S) Scenes of Instruction in Renaissance Romance, Dolven, 2008.

1592, William received 14s 8d towards building his study and trimming his chamber.

1592, William published a translation of ‘Peter Ramus’ Arithmetic’.

1592-93, William farmed the Vicarage, receiving £40. (S) Hist. of Plymouth, Worth, 1890, P271.

11/18/1601, William Kempe, Master of the Grammar School at Plymouth, wrote his will. He named his father, Walter Kempe, his brother Robert, and his sisters, Thomasine, and Joany [whom he left his smallest volume of the English Bible.] William also mentions his brother-in-law John Honkin, his cousin Pascowe Kempe of Rame (will of 7/18/1628). He names his wife Joan, giving the names of his children as William, Judith, Elizabeth, Joan and Wilmot. (S) UKNA.

1601, William died.

ii. Robert Kempe, born ? in England.

iii. Thomasine Kempe  (8195), born ~1580 in Cornwall, England.

“The name Pascowe is derived through a marriage between Thomasine Kempe and John Pascowe, and the widow of the latter we find married Francis Croker, Gent., at St. Stephen's Church.” (S) A Gen. Hist. of the Kemp and Kempe Families.

iv. Joan Kempe, born ? in Cornwall, England.


John Stede of Kent

 19528. John Stede   

~1485, John born in Kent, England, s/o 39056. John Stede & 39057. Alice ?.

5/20/1513, John of age in his father’s will.

Bef. 7/19/1513, John died (S) Will proved.

(S) Stede Hill, Goodall, 1949.

Children of John and ?:

i. John Stede, born ? in England.

ii. William Stede (9764), born ~1512 in co. Kent., England.


Sir Richard Pudsey & Joan Cheney

 46166. Sir Richard Pudsey & 46167. Joan Cheney

~1465, Richard Pudsaye born in England.

1469, Joan Cheney born in England, d/o 92334. John Cheney.

6/26/1483, Richard III succeeded Edward V as King of England.

[––Joan & Thomas––]

Joan married 1st Thomas Say.

2/15/1484, Thomas Bultell gave Lyston Overhalle manor, Essex, in fee to Thomas Say and Joan his wife. (S) IPM of Thomas Say, 6/30/1497.

8/22/1485, Henry VII succeeded Richard III as King of England.

2/15/1487, IPM of John Cheyne of Pyn, esq. [Joan’s grandfather] The said John Cheyne, … Joan Say, aged 17 and more, the wife of Thomas Say the younger, and Isabel Walgrave, aged 15 and more, the wife of Edward Walgrave, are his cousins and heirs, viz. daughters of John Cheyne his son and heir. (S) CIsPM.

1486, Richard Pudsey, serjeant of the king’s cellar, received £40 for the preparation of a ‘disgusing’. (S) Court Festivals of Henry VII, Anglo.

9/1486, Grants by the king: To Richard Pudsey, esq., by way of reward - £7 2s. (S) Materials of the Reign of Henry VIII, Campbell, 2012, P85.

4/1488, Grants by the king: To Richard Pudsey, esq., by way of reward - £10 2s. (S) Materials of the Reign of Henry VIII, Campbell, 2012, P297.

11/1/1491, Richard Pudsey, esquire to Sir Henry Tudor, Duke of York, knighted. (S) Hist. of the Orders of Knighthood, V3, Nicholas, 1842, P11. [On the day Prince Henry, 5 months old, created Duke of York – future King Henry VIII.]

1492, Richard Pudsey a MP for Devizes, Wiltshire.

6/26/1496, Thomas Say died. (S) IPM of Thomas, 6/30/1497.

10/3/1496, IPM of Thomas Say. Somerset: John Cheyney of Pynne near Exeter was seised of the manor and advowson in fee of Raddstoke, Somerset, and being so seised suffered a recovery thereof to William Huddesfeld and John Bygonell, knt., to the use of himself and his heirs. He died, and the said William Huddesfeld and John Bygonell were and are seised of the said manor and advowson to the use of Joan late the wife of the said Thomas Say and of Isabel wife of Edward Walgrave as cousins and heirs of the said John Cheyny, viz. daughters of John Cheyny his son. The said Joan Say is 28 years old and more, and at the time of the death of the said John Cheyny the elder was aged 20. The said Isabel Walgrave is 26 years old, and at the time of the death of the said John Cheyny was aged 18. (S) CIsPM.

[––Richard & Joan––]

Joan married 2nd Richard.

1496-97, Richard Pudsey, squire to the body of the king, and Joan his wife granted the manor of Hampton-Inarden, Warwick [forfeited the previous year by Simon de Montfort.] (S) Antiq’s of Warwickshire, V2, 1730, P955.

6/4/1497, Richard Pudsey, esquire, enfeoffed Thomas Coterell, Robert Stowell, the younger, William Wadham, of Katerston, and Edward Walgrave therein, for the performance of his last will. (S) IPM of Richard.

6/17/1497, Sir Richard Pudsey at the Battle of Blackheath [Also known as the Battle of Deptford Bridge]. An army of 15,000 came from Cornwall protesting a tax on the tin industry and marched on London. James Touchet, baron Audeley, joined the group. Henry VIII had a force of 25,000 which defeated the Cornish army. James Touchet was captured. (S) Knights of England, Shaw, V1, 1970, P29.

11/12/1497, IPM of Margaret Wodehull late the wife of Thomas Wodehull, esquire. … was seised in fee of Two parts of the manor of Didesham [Devon] demised to her for life, with remainder to the right heirs of John Hill, esquire. … died so seised, when they descended to Joan wife of Richard Pudesey, knight, and Isabel wife of Edward Waldegrave, esquire, as cousins and heirs of the said John Hill, viz. daughters of John Cheyny of Pynne son of Alice [Elizabeth] sister of the said John Hyll, who entered and are still seised thereof in fee in right of the said Joan and Isabel, aged respectively 30 and 22. [This Margaret 1st married to John Hulle, brother of Elizabeth (184669), Joan’s paternal grandmother.]

1498, Sir Richard Pudsey, Kt., High Sheriff of Warwickshire.

6/27/1500, Stephen Hamerton, knight died. IPM: … York: … land in Preston … Richard Pudsey, a half-bovate there, by knight-service and 4d. rent … (S) CIsPM.

8/9/1500, Richard Pudsey wrote his will: His feoffees should, within two years of his decease, make estate to Joan, his wife, in all the premises for the term of her life, with remainder to Elizabeth Pudsey, his and her daughter, to her and the heirs of her body, with remainder to his own right heirs. (S) IPM of Richard. [No mention of Ann, so she must have been born after he wrote his will.]

8/24/1500, Richard died.

9/9/1503, Joan died.

3/6/1504, Writ of Mandamus for Richard Pudsey, knight. … He died 24 August, 15 Henry VII. The said Joan died 9 September, 29 (sic) Henry VII. The said Elizabeth is his daughter and heir, and is aged 4 and more. Wilts:  messuages … tofts … tenements … lands … worth [total] £6 38s 15d. (S) CIsPM.

 (S) Hist. of Berkshire, V4, 1924, Inkpen. (S) Collectanea Topo. et Gen., 1834, P409. (S) Antiquary, V32, 1896, P223. (S) Hist. of Somerset, V3, 1974, East Lydford.

Family notes:

·         1491, Possible family connection: Richard Pudsey, is squire/knight to the infant Prince Henry, who’s mother Queen Elizabeth, is d/o King Edward IV, of the House of York.

·         (S) Hist. of Somerset, V3, 1974, East Lydford, indicates that Joan also had daughters by Thomas.

Child of Thomas and Joan:

i. William Say, born 1491 in England.

Children of Richard and Joan:

i. Elizabeth Pudsaye, born 1499 in Wiltshire, England.

Elizabeth married William Clopton of Denston, Suffolk.

ii. Anne Pudsaye (23083), born 1501 in Wiltshire, England.


Thursday, October 15, 2020

John Wimbish & Margery Blyton

 65956. John Wimbish & 65957. Margery Blyton

~1395, John born in Norton, Lincolnshire, England.

~1395, Margery born in Lincolnshire, England, d/o 131914. William Blyton & 131915. Mary Engaine.

3/20/1413, Henry V succeeded Henry IV as King of England.

1420, John married Margery.

1420, William Blyton gave Shepreth manor in Cambridgeshire to John Wimbish of Norton, Lincolnshire, and his daughter Margery in marriage. (S) Hist. of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely, V5, 1973, Shepreth.

1423, Letters of Attorney: Wm. de Blyton of Lincoln, esq., & w. Mary have made … our attorneys to deliver to John Wymbyssh & Margery his wife seisin of the moiety of the manor of Sheppreth with lands in Foxton & Sheppreth. (S) UKNA.

1433, John died.

[––Margery––]

Margery married 2nd John Rumpney of Nettleham.

1433-56, Plaintiffs: John Rumpney, of Nettleham, and Margaret his wife, daughter of William Blyton, of Lincoln. Subject: Lands, etc in Lincoln city, Nettleham, and Ashby next Fenby. Lincolnshire. (S) UKNA.

Margery died.

(S) Hist. of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely, V9, 1989, Papworth Everard. (S) Hist. of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely, V8, 1982, Foxton.

Child of John and Margery:

i. Thomas Wymbish (32978), born 1431 in Liincolnshire, England.


Sheriff John Cheyne Esq. & Alice Stawall

 92334. Sheriff John Cheyne Esq. & 92335. Alice Stawall.

~1440, John Cheney born in Exeter, England, s/o 184668. John Cheney & 184669. Elizabeth Hull.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

12/9/1461, Quitclaim from John Cheyne of Pynne, co. Devon, gent., and John More of Colyton, co. Devon, gent., … Manor of Glynde. (S) UKNA.

10/26/1462, John Cheyne of Pymme, Sheriff, replies that he delivered to Ralph Morewell the messuages and lands. (S) UKNA.

2/8/1463, An inquisition made before John Cheyne, of Pynne, Sheriff of Devon. (S) UKNA.

7/12/1463, Commission to William Boughchier of FitzWaryen, knight, John Denham, … John Cheny, … and William Champernon to arrest John Colpeston, ‘gentilman’ and bring him to the king. (S) CPRs, 1897, P303.

1466, Quitclaim. Property in Ashwick, Somerset. John Bourne esq., Chalfield, Wilts to John Cheyne, esq. (S) UKNA.

1473-75, Defendants: John Cheyne, of Pynne, Devon, esquire, and James Marcoll, executors of Dame Cecille Kyriell. (S) UKNA.

3/16/1483, John gave the manor of Pynnehoe to Edmund Cheyne, his son, in tail, with remainder in default to himself and his right heirs. (S) IPM of John.

10/1483, The Marquis of Dorset, Giles Daubeney, John Cheney, Walter Hungerford, and others, marched to Salisbury to aid the movement in Wales of Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, against King Richard III.

8/22/1485, Henry VII succeeded Richard III as King of England.

1483-85, Plaintiffs: Harry Wentworth, knight, father of Philip Wentworth. Defendants: William Say, knight. Subject: Marriage of Isabel, a daughter of John Cheney, the younger, of Pynne, and Alis, his wife. Devon. (S) UKNA.

1/20/1487, John died a month before his father. (S) IPM.

2/13/1487, IPM of John Cheyne, of Pyn’, esq. … his son Edmund is still seised of Pynnhoe in fee tail. He died 20 Jan. last. Joan Saye, aged 17, and Elizabeth Walgrave, aged 40, are his daughters and heirs. Devon: Manor of Pynnehoe, worth £10. (S) CIsPM. [Edmund must have died soon after. The daughters are named as the heirs of the grandfather a month later.]

(S) Hist. of Berkshire, V4, 1924, Inkpen. (S) Collectanea Topo. et Gen., 1834, P409. (S) Antiquary, V32, 1896, P223. (S) Hist. of Somerset, V3, 1974, East Lydford.

Family notes:

·         10/3/1496, IPM of Thomas Say. Somerset: John Cheyney of Pynne near Exeter was seised of the manor and advowson in fee of Raddstoke, Somerset, and being so seised suffered a recovery thereof to William Huddesfeld and John Bygonell, knt., to the use of himself and his heirs. He died, and the said William Huddesfeld and John Bygonell were and are seised of the said manor and advowson to the use of Joan late the wife of the said Thomas Say and of Isabel wife of Edward Walgrave as cousins and heirs of the said John Cheyny, viz. daughters of John Cheyny his son. The said Joan Say is 28 years old and more, and at the time of the death of the said John Cheyny the elder was aged 20. The said Isabel Walgrave is 26 years old, and at the time of the death of the said John Cheyny was aged 18. (S) CIsPM. [John Cheyney died earlier than this record indicates.]

11/12/1497, IPM of Margaret Wodehull late the wife of Thomas Wodehull, esquire. … was seised in fee of Two parts of the manor of Didesham [Devon] demised to her for life, with remainder to the right heirs of John Hill, esquire. … died so seised, when they descended to Joan wife of Richard Pudesey, knight, and Isabel wife of Edward Waldegrave, esquire, as cousins and heirs of the said John Hill, viz. daughters of John Cheyny of Pynne son of Alice [Elizabeth]sister of the said John Hyll, who entered and are still seised thereof in fee in right of the said Joan and Isabel, aged respectively 30 and 22.

Children of John and Alice:

i. Joan Cheney (46167), born 1469 in England.

ii. Isabel Cheney, born 1471 in England.

1483-85, Isabel 1st contracted to marry Philip Wentworth.

By 1497, Isabel married Edward Waldegrave, esq.

By 11/10/1507, Isabel died.


Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Thomas Coryngton of Cornwall & Blanche ?

131074. Thomas Coryngton & 131075. Blanche ?

~1470, Thomas born in Cornwall, England.

6/1493 at Hey, Cornwall. Grant, in tail, by William Baron, clerk, …, to Thomas Coryngton, and Blanche his wife, of all their messuages, lands, and tenements, in Trenewith and Penesquynan, which they lately had, together with all the said Thomas's messuages, lands, and tenements, in Lamelyn, of the grant of the said Thomas. (S) Ancient Deeds, V3, 1900, D916.

10/1/1495, Bond by John Coryngton of Trencryke [Cornwall], esquire, John Buketon of Buketon, and Thomas Coryngton of Hey in the parish of St. Ives, gentlemen, to Arthur, eldest son of the king, prince of Wales duke of Cornwall, and earl of Chester and Flynt, for £100. [For ‘good behavior’.] (S) Ancient Deeds, V3, 1900, D774.

7/12/1508, Pardon to … Richard Code of Morvall (32824),esquire, … John Glynne of Morval (65650), esquire, … John Tregasowe (65654) of Leskerd, esquire, … Thomas Corryngton of Hey, ‘gentilman’, … tinners, bounders or possessors of tin-works in co. Cornwall. (S) CPRs.

Bef, 8/26/1519, Thomas, gentilman, of Hey, parish of St. Ives, Cornwall, died.

(S) Visitations of the County of Cornwall, 1887, Vivian, P41.

Children of Thomas and Blanche:

i. Elizabeth Coryngton (65537), ~1508 in Hey, Cornwall, England.

ii. Mary Coryton, born ? in Hey, Cornwall, England.

8/26/1519, Parties: 1) William Trubody of Treworeck in St Cleer, to 2) John Trubody his eldest son, and Mary, daughter of Thomas Coryton, gentleman deceased, whom John Trubody is to marry. Litelton Perote alias Castell in Lanlivery, and Polscoff in St Winnow near Lostwithiel. (S) Cornwall Council, CN/800.


Burgess Richard Coode & Alice Durnford

 131296. Burgess Richard Coode & 131297. Alice Durnford

~1390, Richard born in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, s/o §§Richard Coode & §§Joan ?.

~1402, Alice born in Gidleigh, Cornwall, England, d/o 262594. John Durnford & 262595. Joan Cokeyne.

3/20/1413, Henry V succeeded Henry IV as King of England.

1420, Richard presented to Gidleigh, Cornwall.

Richard & Alice died.

Family notes:

·         1354, Richard Coode, M.P. for Liskeard.

·         1362-63, Grant by Joan, late the wife of Robert de Treyer the elder, widow, to Henry Frund, vicar of the church of Liskyrd, … in the town and manor of Liskyrd, with the rents and services of all her free tenants there; with remainder to Robert son of Robert Crochard the elder, of Treyer, and his heirs by his wife Thomasia, daughter of Richard Code, …: [Cornw.] UKNA, E 210/1004.

·         1363, R. Code a Portreeve of the city of Liskeard. (S) Hist. of the Borough of Liskeard, Allen, 1856, P256.

·         1368, Richard Code of Morval the mayor of Liskeard. (S) Hist. of the Borough of Liskeard, Allen, 1856, P475.

·         12/10/1373, Richard Code and William Cysell, burgesses, to be paid £6 4s for attendance at parliament for 31 days representing Liskird. (S) CCRs.

·         1375-76, Henry Frund, Vicar of Liskear, and Thomas Bosky Wying, chaplain to Richard Code and Joan his wife: Quitclaim of messuages and land in Liskeard (Cornw.) (S) UKNA, E 210/6597.

Children of Richard and Alice:

i. Walter Coode (65648), born ~1420 in Cornwall, England.


Mayor William de Blyton & Mary Engaine

 131914. Mayor William de Blyton & 131915. Mary Engaine

~1355, William born in Lincolnshire, England, s/o 263828. Sir John de Blyton & 263829. Agnes Deyville.

~1360, Mary born in Cambridgeshire, England, coheriess & d/o 263830. Sir John de Engaine & 263831. Margaret de la Haye.

1375, Demise: John de Blyton of Lincoln, chiv. & Wm. his son & heir to Tho. de Thornhagh of Lincoln, "Barker"; 1 croft lying in the parish of St Faith the Virgin in the suburb of Lincoln between the land of John de Bultham of Lincoln "couper" on the east, the King's way on the west & south & upon the croft of Wm. de Thornhagh on the north. To hold for 60 years. (S) UKNA.

1378, William’s father died.

1378, Demise: Wm. de Blyton s. & h. of Sir John de Blyton of Lincoln, knt., dec., to Ric. de Tytheby of Lincoln & w. Joan; tenement in the parish of St. Peter ad archis Lincoln. (S) UKNA.

5/1383, William Blyton holding a tenement in St. Benedict’s parish, Lincoln.

6/1383, John de Engaine held ‘Walewyns’ in Long Stanton for life with remainder to his daughter Mary and her husband, William Blyton of Lincoln.

1383, Demise: Wm. de Blyton s. & h. of John de Blyton of Lincoln, knt., to Thos. de Thornhagh of Lincoln "Barker". (S) UKNA.

1387, The 5 “Lords Appellant” organized to oppose Richard II, who was attempting to make a treaty with the French.

1387-88, The Mayor & Commonalty of the City of Lincoln to Wm. s. of John de Blyton of Lincoln, knt.; a weir(gurgites) in the Wethime. (S) UKNA.

3/1388, William included on the list of people who were to take the general oath in support of the Lords Appellant.

1388, William compensated for the destruction of his tenement (of 5/1383) to make the road leading to the bridge wider.

3/1390, William one of the persons of the city of Lincoln bound to keep the peace on pain of 100 marks. The disputes were juridistictional issues between the city, and the Dean and chapter of Lincoln cathedral.

1393, One of William’s servants murdered at Lincoln.

1394, Mary’s father died. Mary and her sister Joan heiresse of their mother’s property.

1395, Wm. Castellacre, knt., … to Wm. Blyton of Lincoln, …; the manor of Longestanton called Waleweyns in co. Camb. for 11 years; remainder to Wm. s. of John Dengayne, knt., & the heirs of Wm.'s body; remainder, as of one moiety, to Mary now wife of the said Wm. Blyton of Lincoln & the heirs of her body; remainder to Joan, wife of Baldewin de Sancto Georgio, knt., & the heirs of her body; remainder as to the other moiety to the said Joan & the heirs of her body; remainder to the said Mary & the heirs of her body; remainder as to the whole manor to Thos. Dengayne & the heirs of his body; remainder to Katherine late the wife of John Burgh, knt., & the heirs of her body; remainder to the right heirs of John Dengayne of Taversam. (S) Lancs Record Office: DDTO K 22/12.

1396, Recovery: William de Blyton and Mary his wife, and Baldwin Seyntgeorgg’, chivaler, and Joan his wife v. Joan, who was wife of John Dengayne, chivaler, of 16 messuages, 92 acres of land, … in Schepreth and Little Euersdon, and the manor of Shepreth, … which Ralph Crecy, late parson of the church of Thorpe by Asschborn, gave to John de la Hay and Joan his wife, and the heirs of their bodies, remainder to William de la Hay and the heirs of his body; after the death of John and Joan the premises descended to William de la Hay and Margaret his daughter, and ought to descend to Mary and Joan the wife of Baldwin, daughters and heirs of the said Margaret. (S) Lancs Record Office: DDTO/09/14.

1397, William Blyton of Lincolnshire held Wimbish manor, Cambridge. [In right of Mary.]

1398, William attested a deed for the mayor and corporation of Lincoln.

11/19/1399, To the mayor and bailiffs of Lincoln. Writ for £11 16s in favour of Robert de Sutton and William de Blyton, citizens coming to parliament, namely 2s a day each for 59 days. (S) CCRs. [William and Robert presented a petition for the city of Lincoln that, because of pestilence and other burdens, a great part of the ‘farm’ could not be levied and that citizens were leaving the city in order to escape the fee farm rent. They asked the king for relief.]

1/1400, William a commissioner of array in Lincoln.

1401, William Blyton, mayor of Lincoln. (S) The Date Book for Lincoln, Stationer’s Hall.

1401, Willielmus Blyton, and Johannes Balderton, elected members of parliament for the city of Lincoln. (S) The Date Book for Lincoln, Stationer’s Hall.

9/6/1402, William de Blyton, Mayor of Lincoln. (S) UKNA.

11/6/1402, Baldwin Seint George to William de Blyton the elder and William de Lodyngton. Recognisance for £100, to be levied etc. in Cambridgeshire. (S) CCRs.

11/25/1402, To the mayor and bailiffs of Lincoln. Writ for £13 in favour of William Blyton and John Balderton citizens at the previous parliament, namely 2s. a day each for 65 days. (S) CCRs.

10/5/1403, To the sheriff of Lincoln. Writ of supersedeas omnino in respect of causing John Nesse prior of St. Katherine without Lincoln to find security for keeping the peace toward William de Blyton of Lincoln. (S) CCRs.

4/22/1407, William Blyton, esquire, a feoffe of Ralph Longforth of Suthwell, Nottingham, deceased. (S) IPM of Ralph Longforth.

1412, William held lands in the city of Lincoln, and in Lincolnshire worth £32 yearly.

1420, William Blyton gave Shepreth manor in Cambridgeshire to John Wimbish of Norton, Lincolnshire, and his daughter Margery in marriage. (S) Hist. of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely, V5, 1973, Shepreth.

1422, William the mayor of Lincoln.

1423, William Blyton, mayor of Lincoln. (S) The Date Book for Lincoln, Stationer’s Hall.

1423, Letters of Attorney: Wm. de Blyton of Lincoln, esq., & w. Mary have made … our attorneys to deliver to John Wymbyssh & Margery his wife seisin of the moiety of the manor of Sheppreth with lands in Foxton & Sheppreth. (S) UKNA.

5/6/1425, Hamon Sutton',… querents, and William Blyton', son of John de Blyton' of Lincoln', knight, and Mary, his wife, deforciants. The manor of Bultham called Blyton' Maner. Hamon, John, John, Robert and Simon have given them 300 marks of silver. (S) Feet of Fines, Lincolnshire.

By 1429, William died.

9/1429, City of Lincoln. Master Peter Pertrich, … Chancellor of … Church of Blessed Mary of Lincoln …, executors of the will of William Blyton, late of Lincoln, son of John de Blyton, knt., sued Henry Bayldon … for a debt of £11. (S) The Baildons, A History of a Yorkshire Manor, V2, 1924.

(S) Hist. of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely, V8, 1982, Foxton. (S) Hist. of Parliament, Roskell, 1993.

Family notes:

·         Note a related family resided in the county of Lincoln:

·         2/23/1406, IPM of William de Blyton of Long Leadenham: Lincolnshire. Lincoln: Canwick … Washingborough …Wellingore … Long Leadenham … He died at Southwell on 1 Feb. last. Robert his son and heir is aged 40 years and more. (S) CIsPM.

Child of William and Mary:

i. Margery Blyton (65957), born ~1395 in Lincolnshire, England.


Lord Henry Sydenham & Margaret Whyton

155944. Lord Henry Sydenham & 155945. Margaret Whyton

~1370, Henry born in Somerset, England, s/o 623774. Richard de Sydenham & 623775. Joan Wyvelescombe.

6/21/1377, Richard II, age 10, succeeded Edward III as King of England.

~1373, Margaret born in England, d/o 311890. John de Whyton & 3802773. Joan Hussey.

By 1393, Henry married to Margaret.

4/18/1393, Will of Henry Wyvelescombe [Henry’s maternal grandfather] … to be buried … Bristol … Clarice my wife … to Master Simon Sydenham and his sister Joan Sydenham, … To Henry Sydenham my silver seal and chain … Henry son of Richard Sydenham and his lawful heirs the tenement inhabited by testator … If the said Henry should die s.p., remainder to his brother Simon Sydenham, and in default of issue, to their sister Joan and her heirs. … and Henry Sydenham, Executors. (S) Abstracts of Wills, Council House of Bristol, Wadeley, 1886, P36.

1396, John Rivers, sold a fee in Stogumber to Simon and Henry Sydenham, sons of Richard Sydenham of Combe Sydenham.

5/8/1398, Writ of supersedeas omnino in respect of their demand upon Richard Sydenham, appointed with others to make inquisition … as the same came not to the hands of Richard Sydenham, as Henry his son has made oath in chancery. (S) CCRs.

9/30/1399, Henry IV succeeded Richard II as King of England.

11/22/1401, Licence for Henry Sydenham and Richard Sydenham, "domicelli," to have masses celebrated by fit chaplains in their oratories, at the bishop's pleasure. (S) Registers of Henry Bowett, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1950.

6/9/1404, John Bochell and his wife Isabel sold Margaret, and Elizabeth, co-heirs of John Witon, most of her inheritance at Quarme in Timberscombe. (S) Kidner, 1996-2008.

11/17/1404, William Hewys instituted as rector of the Asschebritell at the presentation of Henry Sydenham. (S) Registers of Henry Bowett, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1950.

Aft. 7/1406, Henry’s father died.

3/26/1412, IPM of Joan widow of Thomas Hungerford, knight. Wiltshire: She held the manor and advowson of Teffont Evias in her demesne as of fee of the earl of Salisbury … manor of Heytesbury Eastcourt … They had issue Walter Hungerford, knight, who is still living. … in fee tail she held the manor of Heytesbury … She held in dower 100s. rent … She died on 21 March last. Walter her son and heir is aged 33 years and more. Somerset: manor of Holbrook … manors of Wellow and Farleigh Hungerford … In dower of free tenure from John de Whyton, her first husband, she held a third part of the manor of Bossington by the assignment of Elizabeth wife of Thomas Pauncefot and Margaret wife of Henry Sydenham, daughters of John. (S) CIsPM.

5/15/1413, Letter of attorney appointing … attorneys of Simon Sydenham, clerk, John Warre, Thomas Dratton, William Poulet of Melcombe, Somerset, and Thomas Trowe, to place Henry Sydenham of Somerset in full seisen of their land and tenements with appurtenances. (S) UKNA.

8/31/1422, Henry VI (an infant) succeeded Henry V as King of England.

1427, Henry died.

1427-28, Walter Pauncefot and the heir of Henry Sydenham [John, 77972] and William Bacholl for half a knight’s fee in Kytenore. (S) Hist. of West Somerset, V1, Healey, P391.

By 1431, Margaret died.

(S) Hist. of Somerset, V5, 1985, Stogumber. (S) G&H Hist of the Ext & Dorm Bs, Burke, 1841, P514.

Family notes:

·         12/13/1431, Walter Paunsfot, son of Elizabeth one of the daughters and heirs of John Whiton, and John Sydenham, son of Margaret the other daughter and heir. Indenture … a partition of all manors, lands, … of John Whiton in the counties of Somerset, Wiltesir, Suthampton, Sussex and Surrey whereof after his death the said Elizabeth and Margaret were seised; namely that all those in the counties of Wiltesir, Suthampton, Sussex and Surrey were allotted to the purparty of the said Walter, and all those in Somerset to the purparty of John Sydenham. Witnesses: …, John Paulet, … (S) CCRs.

Child of Henry and Margaret:

i. John Sydenham (77972), born ~1405 in Somerset, England.


Sheriff John Cheyne Esq. & Elizabeth Hull

 184668. Sheriff John Cheyne Esq. & 184669. Elizabeth Hull

~1405, John Cheney born in Pynne, Devon, England, 2nd s/o 369336. Sir William Cheney & 369337. Cecily Stretch.

1421, John’s father died.

~1422, Elizabeth born in England, d/o 369338. John Hulle & 369339. Cecily Stourton.

8/31/1422, Henry VI (an infant) succeeded Henry V as King of England.

1430, John’s older brother Edmund died, his 3 daughters his heirs.

2/5/1432, Commitment to John Cheyne, esquire, by mainprise of … county of Somerset and John Sydenham of the same county, esquire, of the keeping of the manor of Broke, co. Wilts, which Cecily late the wife of William Cheyne, knight, held for life with revision to Elizabeth [married John Colshulle], Anne [married John Wylughby], and Cecily the kinswomen and heirs of the said William Cheyne by reason of the minority of Cecily (now deceased), Elizabeth and Anne [minors] … rendering £22 13s 4d … (S) CFRs. [Cecily, Elizabeth, and Anne were daughters of John’s older brother Edmund.] (S) Marriages from CCRs.

11/5/1433, Johh Cheyne of Pynne, Sheriff of Devon. (S) CFRs.

7/8/1434, John Cheyne of Brampford Pyne [Devon, Sheriff] replies that he has sent the writ to the Mayor and Bailiffs of the liberty of Exeter. (S) UKNA.

10/21/1434, Will of John Hille, of Spaxton, in the county of Somerset. … To Elisabeth my daughter 2 pair of beads of gold, viz., of the greatest and least value, and £20 to her marriage. I will that Cecily my wife have the custody of my bequests to my children until they come to a reasonably marriageable age. … (S) Somerset Medieval Wills, Weaver, 1901.

Bef. 10/26/1434, Elizabeth’s father died.

6/8/1439, Commitment to Walter Hungerford, knight, Philip Courteney, knight, … by mainprise of John Cheyne of the county of Devon, esquire, of the keeping of all the lands which Margaret late the wife of John Lutrell ‘chivaler’ held in dower of the inheritance of James, a minor in the king’s ward … (S) CFRs.

2/4/1440, Commitment to … Walter Hungerford, knight, … by mainprise of John Cheyne of the county of Somerset, esquire, and John Sydenham of the same county, esquire, … (S) CFRs.

11/4/1443, John Cheney of Pynne, Sheriff of Devon. (S) CFRs.

11/5/1453, John Cheyne of Pynne, esquire, Sheriff of Devon. (S) CFRs.

6/26/1454, Endorsement: ‘I, John Cheyne, of Pynne, esquire, Sheriff of Somerset,’ certify that … (S) UKNA.

11/4/1454, John Cheyne of Pynne, esquire, Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset. (S) CFRs.

1455, Elizabeth’s brother John Hill died, leaving a daughter Genoveva, married to Sir William Say. [By 1529, this John’s line would end.]

3/1/1456, Edith Sampbroke, sister of John Boteler of Staunton Drewe deceased, to … Quitclaim with warranty of the manor in Staunton Drewe [Somerset]. Witnesses: Nicholas Sayntlo, …, John Cheyne esquires, … (S) CCRs.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

Elizabeth died.

[––John––]

5/1/1462 at Pynhoe, Deed poll by which John Cheyne, esquire, directs Walter lord Hungerford, Philip Courtenay, knight, …, feoffees of his manor of Nortonhautevile, with lands, &c., in Somersetshire, and also of 'the Halvyndell' of the manor of Hulpryngton, and lands, &c., in Wiltshire, to receive the rents and profits of the premises after his death, and pay them to his executors for the purposes of his will, and afterwards to release the said premises to the said Philip Courtenay upon the trusts of an indenture made between the said Philip and the said John Cheyne. (S) Ancient Deeds, V1, 1890, C273.

11/3/1472, Richard West, lord la Warre, knight, …, to … precentor of the cathedral church of St. Peter's, Exeter, and John Cheyne esquire, their heirs and assigns. Demise and quit claim with warranty of their manor of Northperet co. Somerset … Witnesses: John Dyneham esquire, John Denys of Orlegh … (S) CCRs.

3/8/1474, John Cheyne esquire of Pynne co. Devon, and James Martoll, to Thomas cardinal priest of St. Cyriac Rome, archbishop of Canterbury, William lord Hastynges, … knights. Bond in 200 marks. (S) CCRs.

1/20/1487, John’s son and heir John died.

2/3/1487, John Cheyne of Pynne, esquire, died [Somerset]. (S) IPM.

2/15/1487, IPM of John Cheyne of Pyn, esq. The said John Cheyne, Robert Stowell, and Robert Hyll, were seised of the under-mentioned manor and lands in fee, and enfeoffed Genovesa, the wife of William Say, knt., thereof, with her said husband’s assent, to hold to her and her heirs for ever. … Joan Say, aged 17 and more, the wife of Thomas Say the younger, and Isabel Walgrave, aged 15 and more, the wife of Edward Walgrave, are his cousins and heirs, viz. daughters of John Cheyne his son and heir. Somerset: Manor and advowson of Raddestok … (S) CIsPM.

(S) Hist. of Berkshire, V4, 1924, Inkpen. (S) Collectanea Topo. et Gen., 1834, P409. (S) Antiquary, V32, 1896, P223. (S) Natl. Archives Prob 11/22/294, Nina Green, 2017.

Family notes:

·         Note: There is likely some mixing of the records of John the father and John the son, especially near the end of their lives.

·         Sir John Cheyne, knight, of Kent, contemporary with this John Cheney.

Child of John and Elizabeth:

i. John Cheney (92334), born ~1440 in England.

ii. Edmund Cheney, born ? in England.

iii. Robert Cheney, born ? in England.

iv. Cicel Cheney, born ? in England.

Cecil married Sir William Courtenay.

v. Eleanor Cheney, born ? in England.

Eleanor married William Stroud.

vi. Isabel Cheney, born ? in England.

Isabel married John Wadham.


Sir Christopher Wroughton

 237644. Sir Christopher Wroughton

1455, Christopher born in England, s/o 475288. John Wroughton.

5/11/1471, Edward IV regained the crown after the Battle of Tewkesbury.

3/2/1475, Parties to Indenture: Indentures between the king and the following, retaining them for service in his invasion of France, Christopher Wroughton. (S) UKNA.

6/1475, King Edward landed his army at Calais, France. Negotiations led to the Treaty of Picquigny.

8/1/1483, Latton, Isabel, late wife of John Horn. … witnesses, John Wroughton the elder, …, Christopher Wroughton, …, John Wroughton the younger, esquires. (S) UKNA.

8/22/1485, Henry VII succeeded Richard III as King of England.

5/10/1488, IPM of John Chokke, esq. … He gave the other under-mentioned manors and lands to John Seyntlo, knt., John Byconyll, Christopher Wroughton, …, esqs., … to the use of his will. (S) CIsPM.

1/10/1495, IPM of John Harwell. … were seised in fee of the under-mentioned messuages &c., and demised them to Thomas Grene, esquire, Christopher Wroughton, …, to the use of the said John Harwell and Anne, his wife, who survives, … (S) CIsPM.

1495, Christopher knighted.

3/12/1495, Charter of Feoffment to Uses. John Chokke … John Seyntlo, Christopher Wroughton, knights, … (S) UKNA.

8/16/1496, Chirstopher’s father died.

10/14/1496, IPM of John Wroughton. He was seised of the under-mentioned manors and land in fee, … Alexander Darell, esq., who survives and is solely seised thereof in his demesne as of fee. He died on Tuesday the morrow of the feast of the Assumption last. Christopher Wroughton, knt., aged 40 and more, is his son and heir. Somerset: Manor of Mourton, worth 100s., … Manor of Washford, worth £4 6s. 8d., … 4 messuages, 40a. land, 10a. meadow, and 20a. pasture in Edeston, worth 40s. (S) CIsPM.

10/22/1496, IPM of John Wroughton. … Christopher Wroughton, knt., aged 40 and more, is his son and heir. Wiltshire: Manor of Henton Columbers, worth £10, … Manor of Henton Wase, worth £6 13s. 4d., … Manor of Medeburne, worth 100s. … Manor of Odehill, worth £6 … Manor of Beversbroke, worth £10 … (S) CIsPM.

9/19/1497, Grant by Richard Beauchamp, knight, lord of St. Amand's, Robert Wylloughby, knight, lord Broke, Walter Hungerford, knight, … Witnesses:- John Cheyne, knight, Christopher Wroughton, knight, John Seymour, knight, … Wilts. (S) UKNA.

10/28/1497, IPM of John Wroughton. One John Caraunt, … were seised of the under-mentioned manor, &c. in fee, … by a certain charter … gave them to the said John Wroughton and one Margaret [Christopher’s step-mother] then his wife, … Christopher Wroughton, knight, aged 41 and more, is his son and heir, … Gloucester: Manor and advowson of Dudmerton, worth 10 marks … (S) CIsPM.

1498-1500, Plaintiffs: Christopher Wroughton, knight, son and heir of John Wroughton, esquire. Defendants: Margaret, late the wife of the said John Wroughton. Subject: Detention of deeds relating to the manor of Alvington and to lands in Wodehouse. Devon. (S) UKNA.

3/1/1504, Lease for lives: Sir John Chokke knt., son and heir of John Chokke esq., Christopher Wroughton knt. and John Staunton, feoffees … (S) UKNA.

6/28/1507, John Ernele esquire of Canynges co. Wilts, to Edward Darell and Christopher Wroughton knights, … Charter confirming gift with warranty of the manor of Palestholt, … (S) CCRs.

2/1/1509, IPM of Robert Brent, esquire. Somerset: … Ameadow in Bawedrip containing 12a., worth 10s., held of Christopher Wroughton … (S) CIsPM.

4/21/1509, Henry VIII succeeded Henry VII as King of England.

6/19/1510, Quit claim to a tenement called Warennys. Witnesses; Christopher Wroughton, knight, William Wroughton, esquire, John Wroughton, gentleman, … (S) UKNA.

9/20/1510, Grant by Christopher Wroughton, knight, to Robert Willoughby, lord Broke, Walter Hungerford, …, knights, … his manor of Brodehenton …  Witnesses:— John Seymour, knight, … [Wilts.] (S) Cat. of Ancient Deeds, V6, 1915, C5209.

1512, Sir Christopher Wroughton, Kt, of Broad Hinton, High Sheriff of Wiltshire.

5/14/1515, Bond of Christopher Wroughton, knight, to Thomas York esquire, for 300 marks. Defeasance; the bond to be void if Wroughton make a sufficient estate in writing to York, of the custody, ward, and marriage of William Wroughton, son and heir of the said Christopher, and also of his manor of Brood Henton, with lands, tenements, … Wiltshire. (S) Cat. of Ancient Deeds, V1, 1890.

1515, Christopher died.

(S) Bawdrip: Manors, A Hist. of Somerset: V6: Andersfield, Cannington, and North Petherton Hundreds, Bridgwater and neighbouring parishes, 1992, PP184-188.

Child of Christopher and ?:

i. William Wroughton (118822), born ~1480 in Wiltshire, England.


Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Lord Thomas Killigrew & Agnes ?

 237680. Lord Thomas Killigrew & 237681. Agnes ?

1446, Thomas Kyllygrew born in Cornwall, England, heir & s/o 475360. John Killigrew & 475361. Joan Molvra.

2/6/1461, Thomas age 15 at the death of his father.

6/28/1461, Edward IV crowned at Westminster, beginning the House of York.

1/4/1465, Gift in fee tail. Henry Bodrugan to Michael Rawlyn. … [Witnesses] Thomas Kyllygrew, … (S) UKNA.

1466-67, Killigrew, Thomas, son and heir of John, esq. Proof of age Devon, Corn. (S) UKNA.

1/26/1474, Thomas Tregarthen senior, …, Thomas Kyllygrew and Laurence Goldsmyth to Thomas Arundell, son and heir of John Arundell knight and of Katherine his wife, and Katherine daughter of John Dynham knight … manors of Uton and Brampton … [Devon] (S) UKNA.

10/15/1476, Bond of Lady Katherine Arundell to Thomas Killigrewe for £20. Cornwall. (S) UKNA.

12/4/1476, Thomas Tregarthen senior, William Menwynnek, Thomas Lymbery, Richard Tomyov, Thomas Killigrewe and Laurence Goldsmyth = (1)-(6) Lady Katherine Arundell = (7). Appointment by (7) of Thomas Tregoys as her attorney to receive seisin from (1)-(6) of their manors, etc. … (S) UKNA.

8/22/1485, Henry VII succeeded Richard III as King of England.

11/25/1486, Thomas Kyllygrewe of Penrynlaugh, seised of the manor of Newenham, Cornwall,  by previous indented charter of Henry Bodrugan, knight. (S) IPM of Henry Bodrugan, knight, attained.

10/18/1489 at Watfold, Robert Arundell granted Thomas Killigrew, father of John Killigrew, and himself for their lives. (S) Hist. of Part of West Somerset, V1, Heley, 1901, P66.

3/22/1500, Thomas wrote his will. [He left 100m to the college of Glaseney in Cornwall.] (S) Hist. of Cornwall, V2, Hitchins, P290.

Bef. 6/7/1501, Thomas Killygrew died in St. Gluvais parish, Cornwall; Agnes an executor of his will.

Agnes married 2nd John Buscarnon of Bodmin.

(S) 1530 Visitation of Cornwall, P268.

Family notes:

·         The 1513-14 IPM of Thomas has to do with the death of his son John the elder.

Children of Thomas and Agnes:

i. John Killigrew, born ? in England.

John married Mary Boleigh, heiress & d/o John Boleigh.

Bef. 1513, John died.

Only child: daughter Elizabeth, married John Godolphin. [Estates going to John Jr. as male heir.]

i. John Killigrew Jr. (118840), born bef. 1470  in Arwenack, Cornwall, England.


Oliver Tregasowe of Cornwall

 262616. Oliver Tregasowe

~1400, Oliver born in Tregasowe, Cornwall, England.

4/1421, Oliver Tregasowe vs. Matilda Treuewyth and Ralph Treuewyth of Fentongollan, Cornwall. Oliver T. claims that Matilda T. and Ralph T., executors of the will of James Halap, deceased, owe him £10 on a bond made between OT and the late JH. (S) CP 40/641, rot. 136d.

8/31/1422, Henry VI (an infant) succeeded Henry V as King of England.

Aft. 9/16/1429, Oliver’s father died.

6/17/1434, Grant … Garden and close adjoining in Lostwythiell in west part of Northe Mylle Lane; garden of Stephen Kendale on the south and of Oliver Tregasowe on the north. … (S) UKNA.

6/1450, Feoffment by John Nanskylly …  Witnesses:— Reginald Tretherff, esquire, Oliver Tregasowe …[Cornwall] (S) Ancient Deeds, V4, 1902, A10359.

1460-65, Plaintiffs: Nicholas Goly, bailiff of the chancellor's lordship of Cargaull. Defendants: Oliver Tregasowe, gent., and Stephen his son. Subject: Riotous assault, seizure of rents, etc: sureties for the peace: Cornwall. (S) UKNA, C 1/27/138.

1460-65, Plaintiffs: John Rosogan, tenant of the chancellor's lordship of Pawton. Defendants: Oliver and Stephen Tregasowe, gents. Subject: Messuages and land in Penlees, Trevythgan, and Trevanson; and seizure of cattle and goods. Cornwall. (S) UKNA, C 1/28/475.

6/28/1461, Edward IV succeeded Henry VI as King of England. [1st Yorkist King, after King Henry VI captured at the Battle of Northampton.]

8/28/1462 at Lostwithiel, Cornwall. Debt (bond) for 100 marks. Pleading: Oliver Tregasowe and John Tregasowe state that John Dogowe made a bond with them in £80, payable at St Bartholomew then next. However, JD did not pay this during his lifetime, and nor has the defendant, Robert Whyte, his executor together with JD's widow Margaret, …, or his fellow executors, to their damage of 100m. (S) Court of the Common Pleas, Mackman, 2010.

9/1464, Oliver Tregasowe and John Tregasowe state that on 28 August 1462, at Lostwithiel, John Dogowe, now deceased, made a bond with them in £80, … John D has not paid, and nor have the defendants, …, executors of JD together with Margaret, widow …, to their damage of 100m. (S) Court of the Common Pleas, Ctr. For Metr. Hist., 2010.

1/1465, Oliver Tregasowe and John Tregasowe state that on 28 August 1462, at Lostwithiel, John Dogowe, … not paid, … to their damage of 100m. (S) Court of the Common Pleas, Ctr. For Metr. Hist., 2010.

1/1468, Oliver Tregasowe and John Tregasowe state that on 28 August 1462, at Lostwithiel, John Dogowe, … not paid, … to their damage of 100m. (S) Court of the Common Pleas, Ctr. For Metr. Hist., 2010.

Bef. 1475, Oliver died.

Family notes:

·         3/8/1347, To ... Oliver Tregazawe, ... Order to be attendant upon collecting and levying 262 sacks, 5 stones, and 1.5 pounds of wool in co. Somerset and Cornwall, ... nothing be taken from cotters and workmen and such simple and poor folk, … (S) CFRs.

Children of Oliver and ?:

i. Stephen Tregasowe (131308), born ~1440 in Tregasowe, Cornwall, England.


Sir John de Blyton & Agnes Deyville

 263828. Sir John de Blyton & 263829. Agnes Deyville

~1325, John born in Lincolnshire, England, s/o 527656. William de Blyton & 527657. Joan ?.

1326, Agnes born in Yorkshire, England, d/o 527658. John Dayville & 527659. Margareta ?.

6/1349, The Plague reached Dorset, and had spread across England by the end of 1349.

By 1366, John’s father deceased.

By 1366, John knighted.

5/4/1366, … Philip le Despenser, Ralph Paynel knight, …, John de Blyton knight, … John Hode, …, William de Skipwyth the younger [all] of Lincolnshire, … of Northumberland, … of Wiltes, … of Yorkshire, … of Derbyshire and … of Leycestershire to the king. Joint and several recognisance for 3,000 marks. (S) CCRs.

2/9/1369, Agnes de Bliton and her sisters Joan de Croft, and Katherine de Egmanton coheiresses to Robert Deiville,  the grandson of their half-brother Robert. (S) Complete Peerage, V4, 1916, P134. [The son of their deceased sister Elizabeth, Thomas de Kidale was also an heir.]

1370, Demise: Sir John de Blyton, knt., to Walter Russell & Walter Oueray of Lincoln, fishmonger; two weirs in the parish of St. Benedict in the suburb of Lincoln opposite the tenement of Roger de Tateshale on the one part & that of Adam de Merston on the other. (S) UKNA.

1375, Demise: John de Blyton of Lincoln, chiv. & Wm. his son & heir to Tho. de Thornhagh of Lincoln, "Barker"; 1 croft lying in the parish of St Faith the Virgin in the suburb of Lincoln between the land of John de Bultham of Lincoln "couper" on the east, the King's way on the west & south & upon the croft of Wm. de Thornhagh on the north. To hold for 60 years. (S) UKNA.

6/21/1377, Richard II, age 10, succeeded Edward III as King of England.

1378, John Blyton the mayor of Lincoln. (S) Copy of the Charter of the City of Lincoln, 1793, Pii.

1378, John died.

[––Agnes––]

7/29/1387, Writ for IPM of Roger de Thwayt. Lincoln: …  in right of Christiana his wife, deceased, … John de Multon, knight, son of Mabel de Multon sister of the said Christiana, Agnes late the wife of John de Blyton, knight, Joan wife of John de Croft, daughters of Margaret Dayvill, another sister of the said Christiana, Thomas de Kidale, knight, son of Elizabeth a daughter of the said Margaret, and Thomas de Egmanton, son of Katharine another daughter of the same Margaret, are kinsfolk and next heirs of the said Christiana. (S) CIsPM.

Child of John and Agnes:

i. William de Blyton (131914), born ~1355 in Lincolnshire, England.

1378, Demise: Wm. de Blyton s. & h. of Sir John de Blyton of Lincoln, knt., dec., to Ric. de Tytheby of Lincoln & w. Joan; tenement in the parish of St. Peter ad archis Lincoln. (S) UKNA.


Sir John de Engaine & Margaret de la Haye

 263830. Sir John de Engaine & 263831. Margaret de la Haye

1/24/1327, Edward III, age 14, succeeded Edward II as King of England.

~1330, John Dayngayn born in Cambridgshire, England, s/o 527660. Sir John Dengayne & 527661. Joan ?.

~1335, Margaret born in Cambridgeshire, England, d/o 527662. Sir John de la Haye & 527663. Joan ?.

6/1349, The Plague reached Dorset, and had spread across England by the end of 1349.

1349, Margaret heiress to her brother William de la Hay.

By 1355, John married Margaret.

By 1362, John knighted.

1362, Edward de Kendale knight and others v. John Dengayne of Teversham knight and Margaret his wife in Pappesworth-everard. (S) Pedes Finium, Cambridge, 1888, P120.

8/1363, John’s father died.

9/18/1363, Order to the escheator to take into the king’s hands the lands held on the day of his death of John Dengayn of Teversham, Cambridgeshire. (S) CFRs.

3/12/1365, Confirmation to John Dengayne and Margaret, his wife, kinswoman and heir of John de la Haye, of Shepereth, and their heirs, of grants to the latter and his heirs, by charters of Edward II, of free warren in the demesne lands of Papworth Everard, Foxton and Shepereth; and of a market at Foxton every Friday and two fairs yearly. (S) CPRs.

1366, John outlawed in Hertfordshire following his failure to appear in court to answer John Henxteworth for a debt of £40.

1373, John witnessed a deed in which Duke John of Gaunt of was enfeoffed of the Cambridgeshire manor of Landbeach.

5/1375, Margaret, kinswoman and next heir of Alice, widow of Sir Thomas Heslerton, acquired a manor in Fowlmere and lands in Harston. [5/1375, Alice [Madingley], widow of Thomas Heslerton, died. 1328, Alice recovered the manor of Heslarton after her father’s sisters attempted to disseize her. Alice d/o Sir Robert Madingley.]

1376, John, for 200 marks, gave up claim to a manor in Barrington.

10/26/1376, John Dengayne, ‘chivaler’,  sheriff of Cambridge and Huntingdon, and the castle of Cambridge. (S) CFRs.

6/21/1377, Richard II, age 10, succeeded Edward III as King of England.

6/22/1377, John Dengayn, ‘chivaler’, appointed sheriff of the counties of Huntington and Cambridge, and the castle of Cambridge. (S) CFRs.

12/1377, John entered into recognizances for £84 as guarantee that he would pay off arrears due on his account at the Exchequer for his term as sheriff.

8/8/1379, Commission to John Dengeyne, …, to search and examine  whether any persons in the county of Cambridge have been omitted from the assessment, or assessed at a smaller sum than they ought. (S) CFRs.

7/18/1380, Commitment to Elizabeth late the wife of John Morteyn, knight, by mainprise of … John de Engayne … (S) CFRs.

1381, Peasant Revolt against new Poll tax. [Aka Wat Tyler’s Rebellion.]

12/1381, John a commissioner to put down riots.

Aft. 1/1382, Margaret died.

[––John––]

1383, John de Engaine held ‘Walewyns’ in Long Stanton for life with remainder to his daughter Mary and her husband, William Blyton of Lincoln.

Bef. 2/1384, John married Joan, d/o John de Northwood & Joan Hert.

5/1388, John represented Cambridgeshire at the ‘Merciless’ parliament.

7/1388, John a commissioner to arrest the widow of Sir John  Chalers.

9/10/1388, Henry Wetynge parson of Fulmer, … to John Dengayne knight and Joan his wife, the heirs and assigns of John Dengayne. Charter of the manor of Pappeworth Everard, which the grantors had by grant of Thomas vicar of Foxton by virtue of a fine levied in the late king's court between the said Thomas, Lawrence Breuley knight, John Granceste and William Castelacre plaintiffs and John Dengayne and Margaret then his wife deforciants, … (S) CCRs.

1391, John sued Sir Roger Northwood for a debt of £36 4s.

4/23/1392, John wrote his will.

1394, John Engaine, knight, of Teversham, Cambs., died.

(S) Hist. of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely, V8, 1982, Foxton. (S) Hist. of Parliament, Roskell, 1993. (S) Hist. of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely, V9, 1989, Papworth Everard.

Family notes:

·         1395, Wm. Castellacre, knt., … to Wm. Blyton of Lincoln, …; the manor of Longestanton called Waleweyns in co. Camb. for 11 years; remainder to Wm. s. of John Dengayne, knt., & the heirs of Wm.'s body; remainder, as of one moiety, to Mary now wife of the said Wm. Blyton of Lincoln & the heirs of her body; remainder to Joan, wife of Baldewin de Sancto Georgio, knt., & the heirs of her body; remainder as to the other moiety to the said Joan & the heirs of her body; remainder to the said Mary & the heirs of her body; remainder as to the whole manor to Thos. Dengayne & the heirs of his body; remainder to Katherine late the wife of John Burgh, knt., & the heirs of her body; remainder to the right heirs of John Dengayne of Taversam. (S) Lancs Record Office: DDTO K 22/12.

Children of John and Margaret:

i. Mary Engaine (131915), born ~1360 in England.

ii. Joan Engaine, born ? in England.

Joan married Sir Baldwin St. George of Cambridgeshire.

1425, Sir Baldwin died.

Child: Son John St. George, his son William St. George, Knt.

Children of John and Joan:

i. William Engaine, born ? in England.

Bef. 1410, William acquired his father’s property in Long Stanton.


Lord John Mauntel

 263868. Lord John Mauntel

6/1349, The Plague reached Dorset, and had spread across England by the end of 1349. [Breakouts would repeat over many years.]

4/1350, John Mauncell born in Northamptonshire, England, s/o 527736. Walter Mauntel.

9/7/1356, John’s father died.

2/22/1371, … [Northampton] Nobetell. The manor … List of free tenants:—…, John Mauntel, … (S) IPM of William de Ferrariis of Groby, knight, CIsPM.

11/22/1373, Writ of Precipimus for Walter Mauntel. … He died on the eve of the Nativity of St. Mary, 30 Edward III. John his son, now aged 22 years and more, is his heir. (S) CIsPM.

12/12/1373, Proof of age of John, son and heir of Walter Mauntel, Northamptonshire. … baptized in the church of Rode … after the birth of John in the year 26 Edward III. … (S) CIsPM.

1/6/1374, Proof of age of John son and heir of Walter Mauntel taken at Rode. Northampton. John Arkewryth, aged 64 years and more, says that John Mauntel is of full age, and was baptized in the church of Rode on the Wednesday before St. George … William Gunne, aged 51 years and more, agrees and says that on the day of John’s birth [his house] was set on fire. … (S) CIsPM.

2/2/1374, To John de Broghton escheator in Bukinghamshire. Order to cause John Mauntel, son and heir of Walter Mauntel tenant in chief, to have seisin of his said father's lands taken into the king's hand by his death; as the said John has proved his age before Nicholas Seymour escheator in Norhamptonshire, and the king has taken his homage and fealty. (S) CCRs.

6/21/1377, Richard II, age 10, succeeded Edward III as King of England.

6/6/1390, Writ of supersedeas omnino, by mainprise of John de Lincoln clerk, John Mauncell and Henry Halle of Norhamptonshire, in favour of William Willyngham, ordered to find mainpernors that he should do or procure no hurt or harm to Geoffrey Michel. (S) CCRs.

1392-93, John Mauntell and Thomas Bray, parson of the church of Earls Barton, to grant messuages and land in Earls Barton and Hardingstone to the abbess and convent of St. Mary Delapré, retaining land in Hartwell and Earls Barton. N'hamp. (S) UKNA.

8/12/1406, To the sheriff of Bukingham. … writ, mutatis mutandis, by mainprise of John Mauntell of Norhamptonshire, …  in favour of Ralph Sheffe of Bokelonde at suit of John Piers for debt. (S) CCRs.

1406-24, “Richard Stathum and Emma his wife. v. John Mauntell, esq.: Manor of Heyford (Hayford Magna), the right of the said Emma.: Northants.” (S) UKNA.

2/11/1415, IPM of John Lumley. Northampton. He held … the services of John Mauntell; namely the homage and 1 lb. pepper for 1 messuage and 1 virgate in Heyford, held by knight service … (S) E 149/105, no. 9.

6/15/1415, John Lumley (deceased) held … manor of Dodford, … and the services of John Mauntell; namely the homage and 1 lb. pepper for 1 messuage and 1 virgate in Heyford, … (S) CIsPM.

11/10/1417, John Mauntell appointed sheriff of Northamptonshire. (S) CFRs.

1419, The  feoffees of John Mauntell, son of John Mauntell, released to him a wood called Shortwood near Roade church.

1/1423, John Mauntell died, his heir was his son John Mauntell of Hartwell, Northamptonshire.

1/20/1423, Writ of diem clausit extremum to the escheator after the death of John Mauncell; Northampton; Buckingham. (S) CFRs.

1423, John Mauntel.

(S) Hist. of Northampton, V5, 2002, Roade.

Child of John and ?:

i. John Mauntel (131934), born ~1395 in Northamptonshire, England.


Followers

Blog Archive